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Current Signaling Pathway News and Events, Signaling Pathway News Articles.
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Estrogen receptors in mom's placenta critical during viral infection
A team of Duke and Mt. Sinai researchers has found a mechanism that protects a fetus from harm when the mother's innate immune system responds to a viral infection. Inflammation that would harm the fetus is dampened by a cell-surface estrogen receptor called GPER1 that is especially abundant in the placenta and fetal tissues. (2021-01-21)

Sloan Kettering Institute scientists solve a 100-year-old mystery about cancer
A long-standing mystery is why fast-growing cells, like cancer cells and immune cells, rely on a seemingly inefficient form of metabolizing glucose to power their activities. In a new study, scientists at the Sloan Kettering Institute offer a compelling solution. (2021-01-21)

Researchers uncover potentially promising therapeutic combination for renal cell carcinoma
Investigators have demonstrated that ACE2 expression is a good prognostic factor in RCC, that loss of ACE2 mediates resistance to classical treatments, and that in preclinical models, treatment with a drug that is downstream of ACE2 can improve tumor responses in RCC and significantly prolong survival. (2021-01-20)

NIH researchers identify new genetic disorder that affects brain, craniofacial skeleton
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have discovered a new genetic disorder characterized by developmental delays and malformations of the brain, heart, and facial features. (2021-01-20)

Lasers & molecular tethers create perfectly patterned platforms for tissue engineering
Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a technique to modify naturally occurring biological polymers with protein-based biochemical messages that affect cell behavior. Their approach, published the week of Jan. 18, 2021 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, uses a near-infrared laser to trigger chemical adhesion of protein messages to a scaffold made from biological polymers such as collagen, a connective tissue found throughout our bodies. (2021-01-18)

Parkinson's: Initial steps to show nerves their growth direction magnetically
One reason why nerve damage in the brain cannot regenerate easily is that the neurites do not know in which direction they should grow. A team of researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), Sorbonne University Paris, and the Technische Universität Braunschweig is now working on showing them the direction using magnetic nanoparticles. (2021-01-18)

Target discovered that halts osteoarthritis-type knee cartilage degeneration
In a mouse study, researchers used nanotechnology and previous knowledge of a protein pathway to significantly reduce knee cartilage degeneration and pain (2021-01-15)

Researchers link cellular transport pathway to aggressive brain cancer
Researchers at McGill University have identified a new cellular pathway that limits the growth and spread of brain tumors by controlling the recycling of cell surface receptor proteins. The study, which will be published January 14 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), suggests that the pathway, which involves a protein called Rab35, is defective in many patients with glioblastoma and that restoring Rab35's activity could be a new therapeutic strategy for this deadly form of brain cancer. (2021-01-14)

Flip the script: cardiac rehabilitation is underused, but a simple change could fix that
Making doctors opt out from prescribing cardiac rehabilitation instead of opting in increased referrals by roughly 70 percent (2021-01-14)

Moffitt researchers discover biochemical pathway that protects cells from ferroptosis
In an article published in Cell Metabolism, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers report on a newly discovered biochemical pathway that protects cells from a type of cell death called ferroptosis. (2021-01-14)

Acute itching in eczema patients linked to environmental allergens
New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that allergens in the environment often are to blame for episodes of acute itch in eczema patients, and that the itching often doesn't respond to antihistamines because the itch signals are being carried to the brain along a previously unrecognized pathway that current drugs don't target. (2021-01-14)

A niche for the eye
What if the degenerative eye conditions that lead to glaucoma, corneal dystrophy, and cataracts could be detected and treated before vision is impaired? Recent findings from the lab of Investigator Ting Xie, PhD, at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research point to the ciliary body as a key to unlocking this possibility. (2021-01-13)

Master designers: Architects of the brain revealed
In a study published in Cell Reports, researchers at Kanazawa University identify pathways in the brain which enable neurons to assemble into functional units resembling tall columns. (2021-01-12)

Texas A&M research explores how melanoma grows and spreads
The first step in treating cancer is understanding how it starts, grows and spreads throughout the body. A relatively new cancer research approach is the study of metabolites, the products of different steps in cancer cell metabolism, and how those substances interact. (2021-01-12)

Scientists identify "immune cop" that detects SARS-CoV-2
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have identified the sensor in human lungs that detects SARS-CoV-2 and signals that it's time to mount an antiviral response. (2021-01-12)

Expanding the boundaries of CO2 fixation
Design and realization of synthetic enzymes open up an alternative to natural photorespiration (2021-01-09)

We hear what we expect to hear
Dresden neuroscientists show that the entire auditory pathway represents sounds according to prior expectations. Their findings have now been published in the renowned scientific journal eLife. (2021-01-08)

Immune cells discovered in the lungs improve virus defense
A research team at the University of Basel has discovered immune cells resident in the lungs that persist long after a bout of flu. Experiments with mice have shown that these helper cells improve the immune response to reinfection by a different strain of the flu virus. The discovery could yield approaches to developing longer-lasting vaccinations against quickly-mutating viruses. (2021-01-08)

Proteogenomics offers insight to treating head and neck squamous cell carcinoma
A new study identifies three molecular subtypes in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) that could be used to better determine appropriate treatment. (2021-01-07)

Designer protein patches boost cell signaling
A new class of protein material that interacts with living cells without being absorbed by them can influence cell signaling, a new study shows. The material does this by binding and sequestering cell surface receptors. The discovery could have far-reaching implications for stem cell research and enable the development of new materials designed to modulate the behavior of living systems. (2021-01-06)

Combined approach could boost breast cancer immunotherapy, study suggests
Activating an immune signaling pathway best known for fighting viral and bacterial infections can boost the ability of genetically engineered T cells to eradicate breast cancer in mice, according to a new study by researchers at the University of North Carolina. The study, to be published December 31 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that CAR T cells, which are already used to treat certain blood cancers in humans, may also be successful against solid tumors if combined with other immunotherapeutic approaches. (2020-12-31)

Eavesdropping on the pH levels inside the brain
Researchers at Tohoku University have developed the first all-in-one miniature pH probe for real-time investigations of intrinsic extracellular pH dynamics in the deep brain structures. (2020-12-23)

Newly discovered receptor helps to sneak a peek at evolution
Certain proteins call for unusual ways to get incorporated into membranes, because the signal sequence required for this process is located at their rear end instead of at the front. The relevant mechanism and its components are well-known and well-studied in yeast and mammals. Scientists have already hypothesised that it also occurs in plants, but there was no evidence of an indispensable receptor, until now. (2020-12-22)

Researchers identify a rare genetic bone disorder through massive sequencing methods
Researchers of the Cell Biology and Physiology-LABRET group of the University of Malaga (UMA), together with the Networking Biomedical Research Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), have described a new genetic skeletal disorder based on a precision medicine strategy. (2020-12-21)

The Achilles' heel of cancer stem cells
Colon cancer stem cells have one weak spot: the enzyme Mll1. An MDC team led by Walter Birchmeier has now shown in Nature Communications that blocking this protein prevents the development of new tumors in the body. (2020-12-21)

Prostate cancer regulator plays role in COVID-19, providing a promising treatment lead
By taking a lesson from prostate cancer, researchers now have a promising lead on a treatment for COVID-19. They found that, just like in prostate cancer, TMPRSS2 is regulated by the androgen receptor in the lungs. And notably, blocking the androgen receptor led to lower expression of TMPRSS2, which led to decreased coronavirus infection in mice and cellular models. (2020-12-21)

Sex-specific Alzheimer's treatment could benefit males over females
A University of Ottawa study found a specific Alzheimer's treatment is effective in male and not female mice, providing a window into the biology of the disease and the effectiveness of targeted treatments. (2020-12-21)

Gene pathway linked to schizophrenia identified through stem cell engineering
Using human-induced pluripotent stem cells engineered from a single family's blood samples, a gene signaling pathway linked to a higher risk for developing schizophrenia was discovered by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The research was published in a recent issue of Neuropsychopharmacology. (2020-12-21)

Seeking to avoid 'full lockdown,' cells monitor ribosome collisions
New research from Washington University in St. Louis shows that cells monitor for ribosome collisions to determine the severity of the problem and how best to respond when things start to go awry. (2020-12-17)

New discovery opens novel pathway for high-titer production of drop-in biofuels
Using an unusual, light-dependent enzyme and a newly discovered enzymatic mechanism, researchers from Aarhus University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have enabled the biological synthesis of high-yield industry relevant production of climate neutral drop-in fuels from biowaste. The study along with the new discovery has been published in Nature Communications. (2020-12-17)

Researchers discover brain pattern that could improve mental health disorder diagnosis
A pattern in how the brain breaks down tryptophan, a common amino acid consumed through food, was discovered by researchers at UTHealth. (2020-12-17)

Proteins enable crop-infecting fungi to 'smell' food
New UC Riverside research shows the same proteins that enable human senses such as smell also allow certain fungi to sense something they can eat. (2020-12-15)

Molecule holds promise to reprogram white blood cells for better cancer treatment
Cancer immunotherapy using ''designer'' immune cells has revolutionized cancer treatment. In this type of therapy, T cells, a type of white blood cell, are collected from a patient's blood and genetically engineered to produce T cells carrying a synthetic molecule termed chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) that enables T cells to recognize and destroy cancer cells. Then these genetically modified CAR T cells are expanded and infused back to the patient. (2020-12-14)

New combination therapy could help fight difficult-to-treat cancers with common mutations
UCLA scientists describe a new combination therapy that suppresses the MAPK pathway by holding cancer-driving proteins in a death grip. This combination of two small molecules has the potential to treat not only BRAF mutated melanoma but also additional aggressive subtypes of cancers, including melanoma, lung, pancreatic and colon cancers that harbor common mutations in cancer genes called RAS or NF1. (2020-12-14)

Biomarkers could help predict severe SARS-CoV-2 infection
Molecular markers in the blood shown to be predictive of severe COVID-19 outcomes resulting from SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus infection have been identified in a study by a Chinese research team. The study results extend understanding of the pathophysiology and clinical progress of COVID-19 with potential for identifying early during the course of infection which individuals are most at risk of developing severe conditions and requiring hospital care. (2020-12-14)

The immunomodulatory activity of a drug would improve the efficacy of immunotherapy in breast cancer
* The team of Eva González-Suarez, from the CNIO and IDIBELL, and the team of Christos Sotiriou, from the Jules Bordet Institute, demonstrate that a drug already used to treat osteoporosis promotes the infiltration of immune cells in breast tumours * These findings propose a new target to increase the antitumor immune response and make breast cancer more sensitive to immunotherapy (2020-12-10)

Astrocytes improve decision-making
A study led by researchers from the Cajal Institute of the Spanish Research Council (CSIC) has demonstrated the relevance of the astrocytes (a cell type present in the Nervous System) in the decision-making process. Data published in Nature Neuroscience journal, indicate that these glial cells favor those decisions with higher etiological value for individuals. (2020-12-07)

Hydrogel could open new path for glaucoma treatment without drugs or surgery
Researchers have developed a potential new treatment for the eye disease glaucoma that could replace daily eye drops and surgery with a twice-a-year injection to control the buildup of pressure in the eye. The researchers envision the injection being done as an office procedure that could be part of regular patient visits. (2020-12-07)

New pathway in Alzheimer's disease provides earlier target for potential therapies
A novel Alzheimer's disease marker--coming early in progression of the condition--could open significant new fronts of research into possible therapies (2020-12-04)

What makes psoriasis sore: Novel role of immune system in the disease
More than 130 million people around the globe suffer from psoriasis vulgaris, a chronic condition characterized by skin inflammation, scales, and dry patches. However, its pathology is not fully clear. In a recent study, dermatology researchers from Japan have uncovered a complex cellular mechanism responsible for the onset of psoriasis and highlighted potential therapeutic targets for future treatment. (2020-12-03)

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