Current Skeleton News and Events

Current Skeleton News and Events, Skeleton News Articles.
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Observations at a shed light on how hard coral survives without light
French researchers have studied for the first time the distribution of hard corals in the French Polynesian archipelago, from the surface to 120 metres deep. As the amount of light decreases, this coral associates with other filamentous algae, in addition to zooxanthellae, which become inserted into its skeleton. These algae, the only ones found at this depth, could therefore play an important role in the coral's adaptation to life at depth. (2021-02-16)

Can a fin become a limb?
Researchers at Harvard and Boston Children's Hospital examine what's happening at genetic level to drive patterns in fin skeleton versus limb skeleton and find mutants with modified fins in a more limb-like pattern by adding new bones, complete with muscles and joints. The results reveal the ability to form limb-like structures was present in the common ancestor of tetrapods and teleost fishes and has been retained in a latent state which can be activated by genetic changes. (2021-02-04)

Horse remains reveal new insights into how Native peoples raised horses
When a Utah couple dug up the remains of a horse near the city of Provo, researchers suspected that they may have discovered an animal that lived during the last Ice Age. New results suggest a different story. (2021-02-04)

Whole body imaging detects myeloma in more patients, treatment initiated earlier
Researchers from King's College London have shown that whole body magnetic resonance imaging (WBMRI) not only detects more myeloma-defining disease than positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) but that it also allows critical treatment to be initiated earlier. (2021-01-21)

Spectacular fossil discovery:
A team led by Sebastian Stumpf from the University of Vienna describes an well-preserved skeleton of the ancient shark Asteracanthus. This rare fossil find comes from the famous Solnhofen limestones in Bavaria, which was formed in a tropical-subtropical lagoon landscape during the Late Jurassic, about 150 million years ago. The almost complete skeleton shows that Asteracanthus was two-and-a-half meters long, which makes this ancient shark one of the largest of its time. The study is published in Papers in Palaeontology. (2021-01-14)

600-year-old marine sponge holds centuries-old climate records
Scientists used a 600-year-old marine sponge to reconstruct a record of ocean temperature in the North Atlantic revealing past volcanic activity as well as the current global warming trend from the release of carbon dioxide and other heat trapping gasses into Earth's atmosphere and absorbed by the oceans. (2021-01-13)

UCF engineering and biology researchers collaborate to aid coral reef restoration
Florida's threatened coral reefs have a more than $4 billion annual economic impact on the state's economy, and University of Central Florida researchers are zeroing in on one factor that could be limiting their survival - coral skeleton strength. In a new study published in the journal Coral Reefs, UCF engineering researchers tested how well staghorn coral skeletons withstand the forces of nature and humans, such as impacts from hurricanes and divers. (2021-01-08)

Researchers identify a rare genetic bone disorder through massive sequencing methods
Researchers of the Cell Biology and Physiology-LABRET group of the University of Malaga (UMA), together with the Networking Biomedical Research Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), have described a new genetic skeletal disorder based on a precision medicine strategy. (2020-12-21)

The 'crazy beast' that lived among the dinosaurs
New research published today in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology describes a bizarre 66 million-year-old mammal that provides profound new insights into the evolutionary history of mammals from the southern supercontinent Gondwana - recognized today as Africa, South America, Australia, Antarctica, the Indian subcontinent, and the Arabian Peninsula. (2020-12-18)

New evidence: Neandertals buried their dead
Was burial of the dead practiced by Neandertals or is it an innovation specific to our species? For the first time in Europe, however, a multi-disciplinary team led by researchers at the CNRS and the Muséum national d'histoire naturelle (France) and the University of the Basque Country (Spain) has demonstrated, using a variety of criteria, that a Neandertal child was buried, probably around 41,000 years ago, at the Ferrassie site (Dordogne, France). (2020-12-09)

Aquatic robot inspired by sea creatures walks, rolls, transports cargo
Northwestern University researchers have developed a first-of-its-kind life-like material that acts as a soft robot. It can walk at human speed, pick up and transport cargo to a new location, climb up hills and even break-dance to release a particle. (2020-12-09)

Videoscope analysis of a Neanderthal skeleton reveals detailed dental information
Videoscope analysis of a well-preserved Neanderthal skeleton from Altamura, Italy reveals detailed dental information, including tooth wear and tooth loss. (2020-12-02)

Scientists determine the structure of glass-shaping protein in sponges
Researchers from TU Dresden and the Swiss Light Source at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland are the first to determine the three dimensional (3D) structure of a protein responsible for glass formation in sponges. They explain how the earliest and, in fact, the only known natural protein-mineral crystal is formed. The results were published in the journal PNAS. (2020-11-25)

Fossil shark turns in to mystery pterosaur
Lead author of the project, University of Portsmouth PhD student Roy Smith, discovered the mystery creature amongst fossil collections housed in the Sedgwick Museum of Cambridge and the Booth Museum at Brighton that were assembled when phosphate mining was at its peak in the English Fens between 1851 and 1900. These fossils found while workmen were digging phosphate nodules were frequently sold to earn a little bit of extra money. (2020-11-10)

A better understanding of coral skeleton growth suggests ways to restore reefs
In a new study, University of Wisconsin-Madison physicists observed reef-forming corals at the nanoscale and identified how they create their skeletons. The results provide an explanation for how corals are resistant to acidifying oceans and suggest that controlling water temperature, not acidity, is crucial to mitigating loss and restoring reefs. (2020-11-09)

Baby dinosaurs were 'little adults'
Paleontologists at the University of Bonn (Germany) have described for the first time an almost complete skeleton of a juvenile Plateosaurus and discovered that it looked very similar to its parents even at a young age. That could have important implications for how the young animals lived and moved around. The young Plateosaurus, nicknamed ''Fabian'', was discovered in 2015 at the Frick fossil site in Switzerland. (2020-11-06)

Rare ancient child burial reveals 8,000-year-old secrets of the dead
An 8,000 year old complete child burial has been discovered at the entrance to a cave at Gua Makpan, Alor Island, Indonesia. It's the first such burial found in the region from the early mid-Holocene period. (2020-11-04)

The cement for coral reefs
Coral reefs are hotspots of biodiversity. As they can withstand heavy storms, they offer many species a safe home. A team of researchers from Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and the University of Bayreuth have now discovered that a very specific type of 'cement' is responsible for the stability of coral reefs - by forming a hard calcareous skeleton, coralline red algae stabilise the reefs, and have been doing so for at least 150 million years. (2020-11-03)

Study highlights lack of evidence for plasticity-led evolution in lizards
Scientists have challenged a popular theory behind the evolution of similar traits in island lizards, in a study published recently in eLife. (2020-09-29)

MarrowQuant: A new digital-pathology tool
EPFL scientists have developed a digital pathology tool for quantifying bone marrow compartments in standard histological sections. Named 'MarrowQuant', the software makes it possible to examine bone marrow biopsies as well as to re-examine historical collections of bone-marrow samples and even old clinical trials. (2020-09-28)

Family care? Healed injuries suggest social behavior in ancestral wolves
Wolves today live and hunt in packs, which helps them take down large prey. But when did this group behavior evolve? An international research team has reported specimens of an ancestral wolf, Canis chihliensis, from the Ice Age of north China (~1.3 million years ago), with debilitating injuries to the jaws and leg. The wolf survived these injuries long enough to heal, supporting the likelihood of food-sharing and family care in this early canine. (2020-09-24)

Jaws of death: USU Eastern paleontologist renames giant, prehistoric marine lizard
Utah State University Eastern paleontologist Joshua Lively describes a new genus of mosasaur, Gnathomortis stadtmani, a marine lizard that roamed the oceans of North America toward the end of the Age of Dinosaurs. (2020-09-23)

Ancient bony fish forces rethink of how sharks evolved
Sharks' non-bony skeletons were thought to be the template before bony internal skeletons evolved, but a new fossil discovery suggests otherwise. (2020-09-07)

First complete dinosaur skeleton ever found is ready for its closeup at last
The first complete dinosaur skeleton ever identified has finally been studied in detail and found its place in the dinosaur family tree, completing a project that began more than a century and a half ago. (2020-08-27)

Ocean acidification causing coral 'osteoporosis' on iconic reefs
Scientists have long suspected that ocean acidification is affecting corals' ability to build their skeletons, but it has been challenging to isolate its effect from that of simultaneous warming ocean temperatures, which also influence coral growth. New research from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) reveals the distinct impact that ocean acidification is having on coral growth on some of the world's iconic reefs. (2020-08-27)

Ludwig Chicago study identifies a novel drug target for the control of cancer metastasis
Researchers led by Ludwig Chicago Co-director Ralph Weichselbaum and Ronald Rock of the University of Chicago have identified in preclinical studies a potential drug target for curtailing cancer metastasis. (2020-08-24)

Massive, well-preserved reptile found in the belly of a prehistoric marine carnivore
Paleontologists have found a giant ichthyosaur skeleton containing one of the longest fossils ever found in the stomach of a prehistoric marine reptile--the skeleton of a four-meter-long aquatic reptile called a thalattosaur. While the researchers can't say for sure whether it was scavenged or preyed upon, it could be the oldest direct evidence that Triassic marine reptiles like ichthyosaurs--previously thought to be cephalopod feeders--were apex megapredators. The findings appear August 20th in the journal iScience. (2020-08-20)

Archaeology: X-ray imaging provides unique snapshot of ancient animal mummification
Analysis of three mummified animals - a cat, a bird and a snake - from Ancient Egypt using advanced 3D X-ray imaging is described in a paper published in Scientific Reports. The technique provides insights into the conditions in which the animals were kept, their complex mummification process and their possible causes of death, without causing damage to the specimens. (2020-08-20)

New species of dinosaur discovered on Isle of Wight
A new study by Palaeontologists at the University of Southampton suggests four bones recently found on the Isle of Wight belong to new species of theropod dinosaur, the group that includes Tyrannosaurus rex and modern-day birds. (2020-08-11)

Imaging method highlights new role for cellular "skeleton" protein
While your skeleton helps your body to move, fine skeleton-like filaments within your cells likewise help cellular structures to move. Now, Salk researchers have developed a new imaging method that lets them monitor a small subset of these filaments, called actin. (2020-08-10)

Brace yourself for these results
Researchers studying the mystery of why some weightlifters' muscles grow much more quickly than others' have found new answers through a novel experiment in which subjects worked out one leg and immobilized the other. (2020-08-04)

Owl discovered that hunted like a hawk 55 million years ago
Paleontologists have described in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology a large owl that killed medium-sized mammals with its feet and claws some 55 million years ago. (2020-07-29)

UMass Amherst biologists zero in on cells' environmental sensing mechanism
Evolutionary and developmental biologist Craig Albertson and colleagues at UMass Amherst report that they have identified a molecular mechanism that allows an organism to change the way it looks depending on the environment it is exposed to, a process known as phenotypic plasticity. (2020-07-28)

Markerless motion capture technology could help skeleton athletes' training
Researchers from CAMERA at the University of Bath have developed the first non-invasive way of measuring athletes' push start performance. (2020-07-21)

Translating skeletal movements, joint by joint
A global team of computer scientists has developed a novel deep-learning framework that automates the precise translation of human motion, specifically accounting for the wide array of skeletal structures and joints. The team of researchers hail from AICFVE, the Beijing Film Academy, ETH Zurich, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Peking University, and Tel Aviv University, and plan to demonstrate their work during SIGGRAPH 2020. (2020-07-15)

Care for cats? So did people along the Silk Road more than 1,000 years ago
Common domestic cats, as we know them today, might have accompanied Kazakh pastoralists as pets more than 1,000 years ago. This is indicated by new analyses done on an almost complete cat skeleton found during an excavation along the former Silk Road in southern Kazakhstan. An international research team has reconstructed the cat's life, revealing astonishing insights into the relationship between humans and pets at the time. The study will appear in 'Scientific Reports'. (2020-07-09)

15-foot-long skeleton of extinct dolphin suggests parallel evolution among whales
A report in the journal Current Biology on July 9 offers a detailed description of the first nearly complete skeleton of an extinct large dolphin, discovered in what is now South Carolina. The 15-foot-long dolphin (Ankylorhiza tiedemani comb. n.) lived during the Oligocene--about 25 million years ago--and was previously known only from a partial rostrum (snout) fossil. (2020-07-09)

Microscope allows gentle, continuous imaging of light-sensitive corals
Many corals are sensitive to bright light, so capturing their dynamics with traditional microscopes is a challenge. To work around their photosensitivity, Laissue developed a custom light-sheet microscope (the L-SPI) that allows gentle, non-invasive observation of corals and their polyps in detail over eight continuous hours, at high resolution. He and his colleagues, including MBL coral biologist Loretta Roberson, have published their findings in Scientific Reports. (2020-06-30)

New extinct family of giant wombat relatives discovered in Australian desert
A giant marsupial that roamed prehistoric Australia 25 million years ago is so different from its wombat cousins that scientists have had to create a new family to accommodate it. (2020-06-29)

Palaeontology: Big-boned marsupial unearths evolution of wombat burrowing behavior
The discovery of a new species of ancient marsupial, named Mukupirna nambensis, is reported this week in Scientific Reports. The anatomical features of the specimen, which represents one of the oldest known Australian marsupials discovered so far, add to our understanding of the evolution of modern wombats and their characteristic burrowing behaviour. (2020-06-25)

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