Current Social Acceptance News and Events

Current Social Acceptance News and Events, Social Acceptance News Articles.
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(Re)Shaping cities to combat inequality
Communities worldwide are trying to address inequality. One promising approach could be to look at the design of a city, according to research with real-world data in the journal Nature Communications. An international team of scientists, including members of the Complexity Science Hub Vienna (CSH), show that urban planning directly influences the formation of social networks in a city and subsequently the socio-economic equality or inequality of its population. (2021-02-18)

Latinx youth's helping behavior tied to cultural processes as well as parenting practices
Although interest in studying prosocial behaviors among US Latinx individuals has increased recently, there is still limited existing research with this population. Evidence shows that prosocial behaviors (actions intended to benefit others) are a marker of healthy social functioning and can both support positive development (such as academic achievement) and mitigate problematic outcomes (such as anxiety and depression). A new longitudinal study in the United States examined relations among parenting, culture, and prosocial behaviors in US Mexican youth. (2021-02-17)

Suggesting healthy food 'swaps' to online shoppers may reduce the calories they buy
Suggesting healthy food 'swaps' to online shopping customers may effectively reduce the calories they buy, according to simulation study. (2021-02-17)

Partners' company helps us stay connected during pandemic
A pair of UCR studies reveal that living with a romantic partner helps people feel more socially connected during COVID-19. But no other pandemic-era social dynamic carries notable benefits, the researchers found: not your kids, not kibitzing with your bestie on Facetime, and not your adorable-adoring pets. (2021-02-16)

Mental health disorders and alcohol misuse more common in LGB people
Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB*) people are significantly more likely to have mental health conditions and report alcohol and drug misuse than heterosexual people - according to a new study led by UCL researchers in collaboration with the University of East Anglia and City, University of London. (2021-02-16)

Study finds U.S. first responders have mixed feelings about COVID-19 vaccine
Firefighters and emergency medical services workers are at high risk of exposure to COVID-19 while on the job and pose an additional risk of transmitting the virus to others. Although vaccines are a promising public health tool for reducing COVID-19 transmission, little has been known about the perceptions of the COVID-19 vaccine among first responders. (2021-02-10)

Home office: Majority supports the new regulation
The occupational health and safety regulation regarding the coronavirus has been in effect throughout Germany since the end of January. It requires companies to offer their employees the opportunity to work from home, as far as their work permits. As the results of the 28th edition of the BfR-Corona-Monitor, a regular survey by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), show, the regulation meets with the approval of the majority of the population. (2021-02-09)

Small and medium-sized firms use social media to reach and persuade new customers
During the COVID-19 pandemic, small and medium-sized firms (SME) have become increasingly dependent on social media as a tool for their international sales process, according to a recent study published in International Business Review. Digital communication tools seem to be most prevalent in finding and reaching new prospects and in the persuasion phase, whereas more traditional communication tools still prevail in customer relationship management. (2021-02-09)

Vaccine confidence grows under new administration, latest CUNY SPH Survey reveals
Under the Biden Administration, New Yorkers' acceptance of the Covid-19 vaccine has increased significantly. In September, 55% of residents reported they would take the vaccine when it became available and this January, 64% reported they would take it. (2021-02-09)

Study: Reducing biases about autism may increase social inclusion
Psychology researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas hope to improve the social success of autistic adolescents and adults by promoting understanding and acceptance of autism among non-autistic people instead of focusing on teaching them ways to think and behave more like their non-autistic peers. (2021-02-08)

Does Goal 7 Energy for All need a rethink?
Goal 7 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aims to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all by 2030. Yet according to new research by Copenhagen Business School the poor planning and execution of decarbonisation strategies in emerging markets challenges the aims of Goal 7. (2021-02-08)

10-year study shows elevated suicide risk from excess social media time for teen girls
In the longest study to date on the effects of social media on teens, BYU research found a correlation between time spent on social media and suicidality risk among teenage girls. (2021-02-08)

US counties with more social capital have fewer COVID-19 infections and deaths
US counties with more social capital have fewer COVID-19 infections and deaths - perhaps because these communities have greater concern for the health of others. (2021-02-05)

The pandemic lockdown's psychological impact on pregnant women
During the lockdown in the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Spain, pregnant women had higher symptoms of depression and anxiety. The finding comes from a study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, which also revealed that women with higher body mass index and lower social support were most affected. (2021-02-03)

Impact of spokesperson identity on sharing of public health messages
Participants in an international survey study reported greater willingness to reshare a call for social distancing if the message was endorsed by well-known immunology expert Anthony Fauci, rather than a government spokesperson or celebrity. Ahmad Abu-Akel of the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, and colleagues Andreas Spitz and Robert West of the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, report these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on February 3. (2021-02-03)

A third of Americans say they are unlikely or hesitant to get COVID-19 vaccine
A University of California, Davis, study found that more than a third of people nationwide are either unlikely or at least hesitant to get a COVID-19 vaccine when it becomes available to them. (2021-01-29)

NTU study finds Singapore public less keen on drone use in residential areas than industrial zones
When it comes to drones, the Singapore public is not as keen for them to be used to provide services around their living spaces, finds a study by researchers at the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore). However, they are more accepting of drones being used in areas like recreational spots or industrial areas. (2021-01-28)

Culture shapes willingness to share personal data to reduce COVID-19 spread
Culture, civic-mindedness and privacy concerns influence how willing people are to share personal location information to help stem the transmission of COVID-19 in their communities, a new study finds. Such sharing includes giving public health authorities access to their geographic information via data gathered from phone calls, mobile apps, credit card purchases, wristband trackers or other technologies. (2021-01-27)

For older adults, specific Facebook activities more important than overall use
The actions that older adults take on Facebook may be more important to their user experience and well-being than their overall use of the site, according to researchers. In a study conducted by a team that included researchers from Penn State, older adults experienced different levels of competence, relatedness and autonomy on Facebook based on the types of their activities on the site. (2021-01-26)

UK public supports usage of tracking technology and immunity passports in global pandemic
New research suggests the majority of people in the UK are willing to use privacy-encroaching tracking technology and support the introduction of 'immunity passports' to protect themselves and others in the COVID-19 pandemic. (2021-01-22)

Research finds people more likely to follow Covid rules when friends and family do
New research has shown that people are more likely to follow Covid-19 restrictions based on what their friends do, rather than their own principles. (2021-01-21)

Social influence matters when it comes to following pandemic guidelines
New research published in the British Journal of Psychology indicates that social influence has a large impact on people's adherence to COVID-19 guidelines. (2021-01-21)

Counting patients social determinants of health may help doctors avert fatal heart attacks
Doctors may be able to predict their patients' risks of fatal coronary heart disease more accurately by taking into account the number of adverse social factors affecting them, according to a new study led by researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian. (2021-01-21)

What does marketing have to do with ill-advised consumer behavior?
A biological account of human behavior can benefit human welfare and marketing can play a critical role in facilitating public understanding and acceptance of biological causation. (2021-01-13)

Cats may help increase empathy, decrease anxiety for kids with autism
While there is plenty of existing research emphasizing the benefits of dogs for children with autism, Carlisle's newest study has found cats may help increase empathy while decreasing separation anxiety for children with autism. (2021-01-12)

Twitter croudsourcing found effective for dermatologic diagnoses
New study from researchers at the University of Paris provides support for social media as a potentially useful tool in the doctor's diagnostic toolkit and a way for general practitioners with questions to connect to specialists who may have the answers. (2021-01-12)

Higher vaccine rates associated with indicative language by provider, more efficient
New research from Boston Medical Center finds that using clear, unambiguous language when recommending HPV vaccination both increases vaccine acceptance and increases conversation efficiency while preserving patient satisfaction. (2021-01-12)

Treatment for chronic pain must address both physical and social pain
Physical pain and social pain may be more closely related than previously thought. Social pain, which typically results from interpersonal rejection or abuse, has been viewed as a non-medical response to external factors. However, recent research suggests that some physical and social stress responses may arise because of shared processing in the brain. (2021-01-12)

Perceiving prosthesis as lighter thanks to neurofeedback
Transmitting sensory signals from prostheses to the nervous system helps leg amputees to perceive prosthesis as part of their body. While amputees generally perceive their prostheses as heavy, this feedback helps them to perceive the prostheses as significantly lighter, ETH researchers have shown. (2021-01-08)

How to mitigate the impact of a lockdown on mental health
The Covid-19 pandemic is impacting people's mental health. But what helps and hinders people in getting through a lockdown? A new study led by researchers at the University of Basel addressed this question using data from 78 countries across the world. The results hint at the pivots and hinges on which the individual's psyche rests in the pandemic. (2021-01-07)

Guinea baboons grunt with an accent
Vocal learning leads to modification of call structure in a multi-level baboon society (2021-01-06)

Facebook posts help facilitate belief that HPV vaccine is dangerous to health
Social media has a history of being a popular place for sexual health discussions, and the HPV vaccine is one of the most discussed vaccines on the internet. Monique Luisi, an assistant professor in the University of Missouri School of Journalism, suggests some HPV vaccine-related Facebook posts can help facilitate beliefs that the HPV vaccine is dangerous to one's health. She believes it could inform officials for the ongoing COVID-19 vaccine roll out and distribution. (2021-01-05)

Study: in social media safety messages, the pictures should match the words
When using social media to nudge people toward safe and healthy behaviors, it's critical to make sure the words match the pictures, according to a new study. After looking at social media posts, parents of young children were better able to recall safety messages such as how to put a baby safely to sleep when the images in the posts aligned with the messages in the text. (2020-12-31)

Estonian-led international network publishes first study of growing influence of social media
The Global Digital Human Rights Network has published a study on the growing role of social media in the processing of information and the fight against misinformation related to COVID-19. (2020-12-23)

No. 1 news release on EurekAlert!'s 2020 Trending List smashes previous all-time record for visits
The most-visited news release on EurekAlert! in 2020 racked up just under 1 million hits -- the most in the site's near 25-year history. (2020-12-23)

Concerns over infecting others matter more for vaccination in sparsely populated areas
Concerns over infecting others play a greater role in people's willingness to be vaccinated in sparsely populated areas than in dense urban ones, according to new research. The findings have implications for public health communications regarding the COVID-19 and flu vaccines and others, and could help in reducing the rural-urban disparity in vaccination. (2020-12-21)

ACP, Annals of Internal Medicine host virtual COVID-19 Vaccine Forum II for physicians
As COVID-19 vaccines are becoming available, physicians and other health care professionals must do the hard work of making sure sufficient numbers of people are vaccinated to end the pandemic. (2020-12-21)

Social media use by young people in conflict-ridden Myanmar
Myanmar youth rely heavily on Facebook for news and information. This can be a platform for disseminating fake news and hate speech. With poor digital literacy skills, these youths may be susceptible to disinformation campaigns and other online dangers (2020-12-21)

Social holidays improve overall well-being
Social holidays improve holiday makers' overall satisfaction with life, as well as satisfaction with the quantity and quality of their leisure time, and social life, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The study analysed the effect of social holidays on holiday makers' subjective well-being and experience of inclusion. (2020-12-18)

COVID-19: what strategies are beneficial to the state
Based on the classic Prisoner's Dilemma, HSE researchers modeled human behavior strategies in the face of COVID restrictions. Their model showed that unequal access to medical care both contributes to irresponsible behavior in some citizens and the independent acceptance of restrictions by others, without any government intervention. The study was published in the journal Public Administration Issues. (2020-12-18)

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