Current Social Networking News and Events

Current Social Networking News and Events, Social Networking News Articles.
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New therapeutic target for Huntington's treatment
Huntington's disease is caused by a mutation in the Huntingtin gene (HTT), which appears in adults and features motor, cognitive and psychiatric alterations. The origin of this disease has been associated with the anomalous functioning of the mutated protein: mHTT, but recent data showed the involvement of other molecular mechanisms. (2021-02-23)

New comprehensive study on feeding patterns of tiger mosquitos in Europe
This study, published recently in the international journal Insects, was conducted by researchers from the University of Granada, the DoƱana Biological Station, and the Biomedical Research Networking Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP) (2021-02-23)

(Re)Shaping cities to combat inequality
Communities worldwide are trying to address inequality. One promising approach could be to look at the design of a city, according to research with real-world data in the journal Nature Communications. An international team of scientists, including members of the Complexity Science Hub Vienna (CSH), show that urban planning directly influences the formation of social networks in a city and subsequently the socio-economic equality or inequality of its population. (2021-02-18)

ADHD, DBD and aggressiveness: Risky genetic factors
People with attention-deficit / hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) combined with disruptive behaviour disorders (DBDs) share about the 80% of genetic variants associated with aggressive and antisocial behaviours. (2021-02-17)

Partners' company helps us stay connected during pandemic
A pair of UCR studies reveal that living with a romantic partner helps people feel more socially connected during COVID-19. But no other pandemic-era social dynamic carries notable benefits, the researchers found: not your kids, not kibitzing with your bestie on Facetime, and not your adorable-adoring pets. (2021-02-16)

Small and medium-sized firms use social media to reach and persuade new customers
During the COVID-19 pandemic, small and medium-sized firms (SME) have become increasingly dependent on social media as a tool for their international sales process, according to a recent study published in International Business Review. Digital communication tools seem to be most prevalent in finding and reaching new prospects and in the persuasion phase, whereas more traditional communication tools still prevail in customer relationship management. (2021-02-09)

10-year study shows elevated suicide risk from excess social media time for teen girls
In the longest study to date on the effects of social media on teens, BYU research found a correlation between time spent on social media and suicidality risk among teenage girls. (2021-02-08)

US counties with more social capital have fewer COVID-19 infections and deaths
US counties with more social capital have fewer COVID-19 infections and deaths - perhaps because these communities have greater concern for the health of others. (2021-02-05)

The pandemic lockdown's psychological impact on pregnant women
During the lockdown in the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Spain, pregnant women had higher symptoms of depression and anxiety. The finding comes from a study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, which also revealed that women with higher body mass index and lower social support were most affected. (2021-02-03)

For older adults, specific Facebook activities more important than overall use
The actions that older adults take on Facebook may be more important to their user experience and well-being than their overall use of the site, according to researchers. In a study conducted by a team that included researchers from Penn State, older adults experienced different levels of competence, relatedness and autonomy on Facebook based on the types of their activities on the site. (2021-01-26)

Research finds people more likely to follow Covid rules when friends and family do
New research has shown that people are more likely to follow Covid-19 restrictions based on what their friends do, rather than their own principles. (2021-01-21)

Social influence matters when it comes to following pandemic guidelines
New research published in the British Journal of Psychology indicates that social influence has a large impact on people's adherence to COVID-19 guidelines. (2021-01-21)

Counting patients social determinants of health may help doctors avert fatal heart attacks
Doctors may be able to predict their patients' risks of fatal coronary heart disease more accurately by taking into account the number of adverse social factors affecting them, according to a new study led by researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian. (2021-01-21)

Aggressive video games: Effects on mental health and behaviors in young people
Aggressive video games are not a risk factor for mental health problems, according to a new study of more than 3,000 youth (2021-01-13)

Twitter croudsourcing found effective for dermatologic diagnoses
New study from researchers at the University of Paris provides support for social media as a potentially useful tool in the doctor's diagnostic toolkit and a way for general practitioners with questions to connect to specialists who may have the answers. (2021-01-12)

Treatment for chronic pain must address both physical and social pain
Physical pain and social pain may be more closely related than previously thought. Social pain, which typically results from interpersonal rejection or abuse, has been viewed as a non-medical response to external factors. However, recent research suggests that some physical and social stress responses may arise because of shared processing in the brain. (2021-01-12)

Guinea baboons grunt with an accent
Vocal learning leads to modification of call structure in a multi-level baboon society (2021-01-06)

Facebook posts help facilitate belief that HPV vaccine is dangerous to health
Social media has a history of being a popular place for sexual health discussions, and the HPV vaccine is one of the most discussed vaccines on the internet. Monique Luisi, an assistant professor in the University of Missouri School of Journalism, suggests some HPV vaccine-related Facebook posts can help facilitate beliefs that the HPV vaccine is dangerous to one's health. She believes it could inform officials for the ongoing COVID-19 vaccine roll out and distribution. (2021-01-05)

One in four doctors attacked, harassed on social media
The first known study to describe physician experiences with online harassment found one in four physicians report being personally attacked on social media, including being barraged by negative reviews, receiving coordinated harassment and threats at work, and having their personal information shared publicly. Some attacks were particularly disturbing, such as threats of rape and death. Although the data were collected before the COVID-19 outbreak, the findings highlight the intensity of online harassment before the pandemic, which has only intensified since the spring. (2021-01-04)

Study: in social media safety messages, the pictures should match the words
When using social media to nudge people toward safe and healthy behaviors, it's critical to make sure the words match the pictures, according to a new study. After looking at social media posts, parents of young children were better able to recall safety messages such as how to put a baby safely to sleep when the images in the posts aligned with the messages in the text. (2020-12-31)

Estonian-led international network publishes first study of growing influence of social media
The Global Digital Human Rights Network has published a study on the growing role of social media in the processing of information and the fight against misinformation related to COVID-19. (2020-12-23)

Social media use by young people in conflict-ridden Myanmar
Myanmar youth rely heavily on Facebook for news and information. This can be a platform for disseminating fake news and hate speech. With poor digital literacy skills, these youths may be susceptible to disinformation campaigns and other online dangers (2020-12-21)

Social holidays improve overall well-being
Social holidays improve holiday makers' overall satisfaction with life, as well as satisfaction with the quantity and quality of their leisure time, and social life, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The study analysed the effect of social holidays on holiday makers' subjective well-being and experience of inclusion. (2020-12-18)

Earable computing: A new research area in the making
Research Group (SyNRG) at UIUC is defining a new sub-area of mobile technology that they call ''earable computing.'' The team believes that earphones will be the next significant milestone in wearable devices, and that new hardware, software, and apps will all run on this platform. (2020-12-15)

Extreme political advertising can hurt campaign efforts
Aggressive political messaging can work against candidates by radicalizing supporters and alienating moderates, according to a Dartmouth study. (2020-12-15)

Social media use increases belief in COVID-19 misinformation
The more people rely on social media as their main news source the more likely they are to believe misinformation about the pandemic, according to a survey analysis. The study also found that levels of worry about COVID-19 increased the strength of people's belief in that misinformation. Two factors weakened beliefs in false information: having faith in scientists and a preference for ''discussion heterogeneity,'' meaning people liked talking with others who held different beliefs. (2020-12-14)

USC study: Young adults who identify as Republicans eschew COVID safety precautions
Young Californians who identify themselves as Republicans are less likely to follow social distancing guidelines that prevent coronavirus transmission than those who identify as Democrats or Independents, according to new USC study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. (2020-12-14)

'The robot made me do it': Robots encourage risk-taking behaviour in people
New research has shown robots can encourage humans to take greater risks in a simulated gambling scenario than they would if there was nothing to influence their behaviours. Increasing our understanding of whether robots can affect risk-taking could have clear ethical, practiCal and policy implications, which this study set out to explore. (2020-12-11)

Strong social support decreases mental health problems in young adults
Early adulthood, a transitional life stage marked by major changes in social roles and responsibilities, can bring with it an increase of mental health problems. (2020-12-11)

Vanderbilt researchers discover strong correlation between partisanship and social mobility during COVID-19 pandemic
According to many medical experts, reduced social mobility - defined here as social contact and travel within and among communities - is a necessary factor to contain the spread of COVID-19. (2020-12-11)

Increased social media use linked to developing depression, research finds
Young adults who increased their use of social media were significantly more likely to develop depression within six months, according to a new national study authored by Dr. Brian Primack, dean of the College of Education and Health Professions and professor of public health at the University of Arkansas. (2020-12-10)

Social media provides SMEs with tools to mitigate internationalisation-related threats
For SMEs seeking to enter the international markets, social media is a tool for overcoming liabilities connected to their smallness, newness and foreignness, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. (2020-12-10)

Health: Loneliness and social isolation associated with higher fall risk in elderly people
Elderly people living alone or without social contact may be more likely to fall in their homes or be admitted to hospital for a fall, suggests a study published in Scientific Reports. (2020-12-10)

State-reported data underestimate the true impact of COVID-19 social distancing
While most studies have used government stay-at-home dates in their models, new research finds that individuals actually changed their behavior in reaction to the presence of COVID-19 in their state a median 12 days before a government lockdown. The research, appearing in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine examines sociodemographic variables as well and finds that individual behavior across certain groups may partially account for the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on vulnerable communities in the United States. (2020-12-10)

Which product categories and industries benefit most from social advertising
New research from a team of scientists at four leading universities has shed new light on the effectiveness of social advertising in specific product categories to learn which product categories tend to benefit more from social advertising, and which may not. (2020-12-10)

Program reduces social isolation among middle-aged and older adults
An existing service in the North West of England called Community Connectors, which enables adults to access social activities within their community, can help reduce loneliness and social isolation, according to an analysis published in Health & Social Care in the Community. (2020-12-09)

Discrimination on social media results in higher depression, anxiety among minority males
Exposure to ethnic discrimination on social media is associated with higher symptoms of depression and anxiety among young Hispanic males, according to a study by researchers at Florida International University's Robert Stempel College of Public Health & Social Work. (2020-12-02)

What social distancing does to a brain
Scientists discover a neuropeptide that reflects the current state of a fish's social environment (2020-12-02)

Unexpected similarity between honey bee and human social life
A team of researchers have experimentally measured the social networks of honey bees and how they develop over time. They discovered that there are detailed similarities with the social networks of humans and that these similarities are completely explained by new theoretical modeling, which adapts the tools of statistical physics for biology. The theory, confirmed in experiments, implies that there are individual differences between honey bees, just as there are between humans. (2020-11-30)

Men tuning into Insta-spiration
New research confirms men are affected by Instagram influencers who set global benchmarks for ideal body shape, fashion and even facial trends. While perhaps not as focused on 'thinness' as women appear to be from female influencers, the Flinders University study confirms males are responding to the body image and fitness messages shared by Instagram leaders, some with millions of followers. (2020-11-29)

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