Current Socioeconomic Status News and Events

Current Socioeconomic Status News and Events, Socioeconomic Status News Articles.
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What is COVID-19's impact on Black and Latino persons living with HIV?
Study looks at COVID-19 effects on engagement in HIV care, HIV medication use, and overall well-being among low-income Black and Latino individuals who have lived with HIV for many years. (2021-02-22)

Addressing the biological causes of racial disparities in prostate cancer
A new review published in Cancer Reports examines the biological differences in the development of prostate cancer across ethnicities. (2021-02-18)

Helping behavior may mitigate academic risk for children from low-income neighborhoods
Children raised in neighborhoods with low socio-economic status are at risk for low academic achievement. A new longitudinal study followed young children from such neighborhoods from birth until age seven to explore whether children's capacity to act kindly or generously towards others (prosocial behavior) - including peers, teachers, and family - is linked to their ability to perform well in school. The study showed that prosocial behavior may mitigate academic risk across early childhood. (2021-02-17)

One in 10 Ohio women thought abortion illegal amid attempts to ban at 6 weeks
Though Ohio never formally enacted a so-called ''heartbeat bill'' banning abortions after six weeks of gestation, legislative and legal actions appear to have fueled beliefs that abortion is illegal in the state, a new study has found. (2021-02-17)

Health survey conveys messages on how we should live
The questions in a health survey aimed at young people raise issues of status and convey norms about what people should own and how they should be. This is according to a study from Linköping University. The results have been published in the journal Children & Society. (2021-02-16)

Star employees get most of the credit - and blame
Working with a ''star'' employee - someone who demonstrates exceptional performance and enjoys broad visibility relative to industry peers - offers both risks and rewards, according to new research from the Cornell University's ILR School. (2021-02-16)

ACC urges COVID-19 vaccine prioritization for highest risk heart disease patients
COVID-19 vaccine prioritization should prioritize those with advanced cardiovascular (CVD) disease over well-managed CVD disease, according to an American College of Cardiology (ACC) health policy statement published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC). (2021-02-12)

Dark-skinned teens, females prime targets of acne's psychological fallout
A more aggressive approach to treating acne that marries the disciplines of psychology and dermatology is needed, according to two UC Riverside psychology researchers. They also assert that women and people with darker skin disproportionately suffer from acne's psychological impacts. (2021-02-12)

Low-income middle-aged African-American women with hypertension are likely to suffer from depression
Low-income middle-aged African-American women with high blood pressure very commonly suffer from depression and should be better screened for this serious mental health condition. (2021-02-11)

Mexico's poor have little luck obtaining opioids intended for palliative care
Despite a Mexican government initiative to improve access to prescription opioids among palliative care patients, the country has seen only a marginal increase in dispensing levels, and inequities in dispensing have left many of the nation's poorest residents without comfort in their final days. (2021-02-11)

Israelis unwilling to risk two-state solution, new RAND report
A new RAND Corporation report assesses potential alternative solutions to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that average Israelis and Palestinians would support. Israelis across the political spectrum prefer the status quo to the two-state solution, and Palestinians are only willing to accept a two-state solution that Israelis will be unable to accept. (2021-02-10)

Pandemic increases substance abuse, mental health issues for those struggling with obesity
The COVID-19 pandemic is having a detrimental impact on substance use, mental health, and weight-related health behaviors among people with obesity, according to a new study by researchers at UT Southwestern and the UTHealth School of Public Health. (2021-02-05)

More than half of cancer survivors have underlying medical conditions associated with severe COVID
New study finds more than half (56.4%) of cancer survivors in the United States reported having additional underlying medical conditions associated with severe COVID-19 illness. (2021-02-03)

Apps help integration and health of migrants
A new study has found that mobile apps can play a vital role in helping immigrants integrate into new cultures, as well as provide physical and mental health benefits. (2021-01-29)

COVID-19: 1 in 3 adults anxious, depressed
COVID-19 has led to psychological distress among one in three adults, systematic review and meta-analysis reveals. (2021-01-28)

Medicaid expansion helps uncover undiagnosed HIV infections
Expanding eligibility for Medicaid, the federal-state health insurance program for low-income individuals, was associated with a 13.9% increase in HIV diagnoses, says new research co-written by Dolores Albarracín, a professor of psychology and of business administration at Illinois, and Bita Fayaz Farkhad, pictured, an economist and a postdoctoral researcher in psychology at Illinois. (2021-01-26)

Despite some advances, women still face disparities of the global burden of stroke
Nine manuscripts featuring research from around the world are featured in a special section of the February 2021 issue of the Stroke journal, published online today. The papers address stroke disparities in women including underrepresentation in clinical trials. (2021-01-25)

HIV treatment in Ethiopia is a 'socioeconomic challenge'
For those who are diagnosed and have begun treatment for HIV, it is standard practice to regularly monitor viral load in the blood to assess response to treatment. A study of people living with HIV in Ethiopia shows that poverty and labour mobility are linked to high viral load despite treatment, indicating treatment failure. The researchers behind the study recommend that socioeconomic conditions should be taken into account to a greater extent in low-income countries. (2021-01-25)

Survey: barriers, not demographics, affect willingness to pursue veterinary care
When it comes to seeking veterinary care for dogs, barriers to access - including a lack of trust - have more effect on the decision-making process than differences in race, gender or socioeconomic status. (2021-01-25)

Addressing the impact of structural racism on disparities in children with Type 1 diabetes
Advancements in diabetes technology have improved quality of life and glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes. However, data show that a subset of children is being left behind. Those from low-income families and non-Hispanic Black (NHB) children are not experiencing benefits associated with technological advances, and are at higher risk for diabetes complications and adverse outcomes through ongoing poor glycemic control. (2021-01-22)

When it comes to eyewitness accounts of earthquake shaking, representation matters
As scientists increasingly rely on eyewitness accounts of earthquake shaking reported through online systems, they should consider whether those accounts are societally and spatially representative for an event, according to a new paper published in Seismological Research Letters. (2021-01-21)

Brain pressure disorder that causes headache, vision problems on rise
A new study has found a brain pressure disorder called idiopathic intracranial hypertension is on the rise, and the increase corresponds with rising obesity rates. The study is published in the January 20, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that for women, socioeconomic factors like income, education and housing may play a role in their risk. (2021-01-20)

Treating moms with postpartum depression helps their babies' brains
For the study 40 infants of women diagnosed with postpartum depression were matched with 40 infants of non-depressed mothers on infant age, gender and socioeconomic status. The mothers with postpartum depression received nine weeks of group CBT. The infants were all tested before the treatment and nine weeks later, including a questionnaire on the infant behaviour completed by the mother and her partner. (2021-01-20)

A new carbon budget framework provides a clearer view of our climate deadlines
Nature's Communications Earth and Environment just published a paper by a group of researchers led by Damon Matthews in which they present a new framework for calculating the remaining carbon budget that is able to generate a much narrower estimate and its uncertainty. The researchers estimate that between 230 and 440 billion more tonnes of CO2 from 2020 onwards can be emitted into the atmosphere and still provide a reasonable chance of limiting global warming to 1.5°C. (2021-01-19)

UW researchers develop tool to equitably distribute limited vaccines
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and UW Health have developed a tool that incorporates a person's age and socioeconomic status to prioritize vaccine distribution among people who otherwise share similar risks due to their jobs. (2021-01-15)

Socioeconomic disparities in patient use of telehealth during COVID-19 surge
Which demographic and socioeconomic factors were associated with patient participation in telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic surge was examined in this observational study. (2021-01-14)

Need to reduce work-related stress? It's a walk in the park
Research from the University of Tsukuba examined the relationship between ''sense of coherence'' (a quality indicative of stress-coping ability) and frequency of walking in forests or greenspaces. The aim was to find easy coping devices for workplace stress. Forest/greenspace walking at least once a week was found to correlate with those with a stronger sense of coherence. The findings suggest the benefits of walking in urban greenspaces or in forests to help with stress management. (2021-01-13)

New research in JNCCN highlights dangerous disparities for life-saving cancer screening
New research in the January 2021 issue of JNCCN--Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network finds more than a third of eligible people miss timely screening tests for colorectal cancer and at least a quarter appear to miss timely screening tests for breast and cervical cancers. (2021-01-13)

Study gauges psychological impact of COVID-19 pandemic on university students
More than half of all university students in the United States have experienced high levels of psychological impact from the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Matthew Browning of Clemson University, US, and colleagues. (2021-01-13)

Youth with family history of suicide attempts have worse neurocognitive functioning
Children and adolescents with a family history of suicide attempts have lower executive functioning, shorter attention spans, and poorer language reasoning than those without a family history, according to a new study by researchers from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania. The study is the largest to date to examine the neurocognitive functioning of youth who have a biological relative who made a suicide attempt. (2021-01-11)

New climate change study: Number of people suffering extreme droughts will double
Michigan State University is leading a global research effort to offer the first worldwide view of how climate change could affect water availability and drought severity in the decades to come. By the late 21st century, global land area and population facing extreme droughts could more than double -- increasing from 3% during 1976-2005 to 7%-8%, according to Yadu Pokhrel, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering in MSU's College of Engineering, and lead author of the research published in Nature Climate Change. (2021-01-11)

Can a mother's stress impact children's disease development?
A University of Cincinnati researcher finds that stress on an expectant mother could affect her baby's chance of developing disease -- perhaps even over the course of the child's life. (2021-01-11)

COVID forced psychiatric care online. Many patients want it to stay there, study finds
A new study suggests that more than half of outpatient psychiatry patients whose appointments were suddenly converted to video or phone interactions by the pandemic will want to keep going with virtual mental health care even after the pandemic subsides. The convenience of seeing a provider without leaving home, and avoiding potential exposure to the coronavirus, factor heavily into this preference. So does a patient's initial experience with seeing a provider virtually. (2021-01-08)

Researchers featured in Medical Research Journal for Artificial Intelligence Studies
A paper written by Arash Shaban-Nejad, PhD, MPH, an assistant professor, and Nariman Ammar, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow, both at the Center for Biomedical Informatics in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, was recently published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research - Medical Informatics. The paper discussed how an artificial intelligence system developed by the researchers was used to diagnose and treat children and adults who suffer from Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). (2021-01-05)

Parents' finances differently affected by having a child diagnosed with cancer
Mothers and fathers of children diagnosed with cancer are affected financially in different ways. While mothers' incomes fall in the short term and then rise, the adverse financial repercussions on fathers occur later. Researchers at Uppsala University have investigated the socioeconomic impact on parents of having a child diagnosed with cancer. The study is published in the International Journal of Cancer. (2021-01-04)

Scientists find out how nutrition affects the recovery of patients after cardiac surgery
Scientists from St Petersburg University have found out how eating habits of patients affect their recovery after cardiac surgery. People with valvular heart disease have appeared to be at risk. (2020-12-25)

Similar factors cause health disparities in cancer, COVID-19
The same societal factors that have caused worse outcomes in cancer for some minority populations are now causing disparities in COVID outcomes. Potential policy changes could help improve outcomes for both diseases. (2020-12-23)

Consumers challenged by high status peers make a 'status pivot,' new study finds
When outshone by peers in one area of life, such as financial success, consumers will embrace making a 'status pivot' to show prowess in another aspect of life, such as personal relationships, social life, parenting, physical and mental health, and fitness, according to a new report by researchers from Boston College, Boston University and London Business School. (2020-12-21)

Socioeconomic background linked to survival after having a cardiac arrest in hospital
Hospital in-patients from lower socioeconomic backgrounds are less likely to receive prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after their hearts stop beating and less likely to survive than patients from higher socioeconomic backgrounds. These are the findings of a new study in over 24,000 patients in Sweden, published in the European Heart Journal. (2020-12-20)

Black women have the highest risk of pregnancy-related heart problems in the US
Significant racial disparities exist in heart-related complications among pregnant and postpartum women in the United States. Despite improvements in recent years, Black women have the highest risk of pregnancy-related heart problems. Clinicians treating pregnant women should be aware of the heart risks associated with pregnancy and should closely monitor women who are at increased risk. (2020-12-16)

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