Current Soft Tissue News and Events

Current Soft Tissue News and Events, Soft Tissue News Articles.
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High energy radiotherapy could 'paint' tumours to avoid harming healthy tissue
A radiotherapy technique which 'paints' tumours by targeting them precisely, and avoiding healthy tissue, has been devised in research led by the University of Strathclyde. (2021-02-23)

Potentially harmful chemicals found in plastic toys
New research suggests that more than 100 chemicals found in plastic toy materials may pose possible health risks to children. The study provides findings that may lead to stricter international regulations. (2021-02-22)

Researchers grow artificial hairs with clever physics trick
Things just got hairy at Princeton. Researchers found they could coat a liquid elastic on the outside of a disc and spin it to form useful, complex patterns. When spun just right, tiny spindles rise from the material as it cures. The spindles grow as the disc accelerates, forming a soft solid that resembles hairs. Published in PNAS Feb. 22 (2021-02-22)

Fibre-integrated, high-repetition-rate water window soft X-ray source
The generation and characterization of light in the soft X-ray domain of the spectrum play an ever-growing role in advancing fundamental research, life science and industrial applications. To meet the continuous demand for powerful, application-oriented optical tools, scientists from Germany have developed a new laser-driven soft X-ray source with a fibre-integrated setup. The approach establishes a new route toward simple and powerful soft X-ray sources, which will enhance and expand applications of short-wavelength light. (2021-02-22)

CUHK physicists discover new route to active matter self-organisation
An international team led by Professor Yilin Wu, Associate Professor of the Department of Physics at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) has made a novel conceptual advance in the field of active matter science. The team discovered a new route in which the self-organisation of active fluids in space and time can be controlled by a single material property called viscoelasticity. (2021-02-20)

Giant predatory worms roamed the seafloor until 5.3 million years ago
An international study in which the University of Granada participated--recently published in the journal Scientific Reports--has identified a new fossil record of these mysterious animals in the northeast of Taiwan (China), in marine sediments from the Miocene Age (between 23 and 5.3 million years ago). These organisms, similar to today's Bobbit worm (Eunice aphroditois), were approximately 2 m long and 3 cm in diameter and lived in burrows. (2021-02-18)

Radiological images confirm 'COVID-19 can cause the body to attack itself'
Muscle soreness and achy joints are common symptoms among COVID-19 patients. But for some people, symptoms are more severe, long lasting and even bizarre, including rheumatoid arthritis flares, autoimmune myositis or 'COVID toes.' A new Northwestern Medicine study has, for the first time, confirmed and illustrated the causes of these symptoms through radiological imaging. (2021-02-17)

Physical therapy after c-section improves outcomes
Women who received physical therapy after undergoing a cesarean section had significantly improved outcomes compared to those who did not according to a new study from University of Missouri Health Care. (2021-02-17)

This robot doesn't need any electronics
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have created a four-legged soft robot that doesn't need any electronics to work. The robot only needs a constant source of pressurized air for all its functions, including its controls and locomotion systems. The team, led by Michael T. Tolley, a professor of mechanical engineering at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego, details its findings in the Feb. 17, 2021 issue of Science Robotics. (2021-02-17)

Credit card-sized soft pumps power wearable artificial muscles
Robotic clothing that is entirely soft and could help people to move more easily is a step closer to reality thanks to the development of a new flexible and lightweight power system for soft robotics. (2021-02-17)

Advances in x-ray imaging can help patients with breast cancer
A new approach to X-ray imaging can help surgeons performing breast cancer tumour removal surgery, giving 2.5 times better detection of diseased tissue around the edge of the tumour than with standard imaging. (2021-02-17)

3D microscopy clarifies understanding of body's immune response to obesity
Researchers who focus on fat know that some adipose tissue is more prone to inflammation-related comorbidities than others, but the reasons why are not well understood. Thanks to a new analytical technique, scientists are getting a clearer view of the microenvironments found within adipose tissue associated with obesity. This advance may illuminate why some adipose tissues are more prone to inflammation - leading to diseases like type 2 diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disorders - and help direct future drug therapies to treat obesity. (2021-02-17)

FRESH 3D-printing platform paves way for tissues, organs
Research into 3D bioprinting has grown rapidly in recent years as scientists seek to re-create the structure and function of complex biological systems from human tissues to entire organs. In APL Bioengineering, researchers from Carnegie Mellon University provide perspective on the Freefrom Reversible Embedding of Suspended Hydrogels 3D bioprinting approach, which solves the issue of gravity and distortion by printing within a yield-stress support bath that holds the bioinks in place until they are cured. (2021-02-16)

Ultrabright dots see beyond skin deep
Tiny light-emitting probes give researchers a better option for noninvasive imaging of living tissue. (2021-02-16)

IU researchers find disease-related gene changes in kidney tissue
Researchers from Indiana University have identified key genetic changes in the interstitial kidney tissue of people with diabetes, a discovery that signifies the potential for a revolutionary new genetic approach to the treatment of kidney disease. They will contribute their findings to the Kidney Precision Medicine Project's (KPMP) ''cell atlas,'' a set of maps used to classify and locate different cell types and structures within the kidney. (2021-02-16)

Origami powered by light
Some man-made materials can mimic plants' slow but steady reaction to light energy, usually triggered by lasers or focused ambient light. New research from the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University has discovered a way to speed up this effect enough that its performance can compete against electrical and pneumatic systems. (2021-02-10)

Scientists switch on tissue repair in inflammatory bowel disease
Researchers have developed a method that instructs immune system cells to help repair damaged tissue in the intestine. The finding opens the way for more effective treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. (2021-02-08)

Identification of three genes that determine the stemness of gastric tissue stem cells
Tissue stem cells can self-renew and differentiate, supplying cells necessary for tissues at various developmental stages. However, detailed analysis in vivo is difficult, so the molecular mechanisms underlying the stemness of gastric tissue stem cells have remained a mystery. Here, by using organoids that mimic tissue structure and function in vivo and GeCKO screening to inactivate arbitrary genes, Alk, Bclaf3 and Prkra have been identified as genes regulating stemness. (2021-02-08)

Two-phase material with surprising properties
Some materials can couple electrical and mechanical properties - this can lead to astonishing effects: New materials have been developed, consisting of both crystalline and amorphous regions. In these special polymers, the electro-mechanical coupling suddenly disappers - scientits at TU Wien have found out how. (2021-02-08)

3D printing polymers
Researchers in the labs of Christopher Bates, an assistant professor of materials at UC Santa Barbara, and Michael Chabinyc, a professor of materials and chair of the department, have teamed to develop the first 3D-printable ''bottlebrush'' elastomer. The new material results in printed objects that have unusual softness and elasticity -- mechanical properties that closely resemble those of human tissue. (2021-02-08)

Robots sense human touch using camera and shadows
Cornell University researchers have created a low-cost method for soft, deformable robots to detect a range of physical interactions, from pats to punches to hugs, without relying on touch at all. Instead, a USB camera located inside the robot captures the shadow movements of hand gestures on the robot's skin and classifies them with machine-learning software. (2021-02-08)

Shuffling bubbles reveal how liquid foams evolve
Tokyo, Japan - Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University studied the dynamics of foams. When a drop of water was added to a foam raft, the bubbles rearranged themselves to reach a new stable state. The team found that bubble movement was qualitatively different depending on the range of bubble sizes present. Along with analogies with soft-jammed materials, these findings may inspire the design of new foam materials for industry. (2021-02-06)

Tiny sensor technique reveals cellular forces involved in tissue generation
A team of Brown University researchers developed a technique that uses tiny polymer spheres to sense the forces at play as body tissue forms and grows. (2021-02-05)

UTA engineers develop programming technology to transform 2D materials into 3D shapes
University of Texas at Arlington researchers have developed a technique that programs 2D materials to transform into complex 3D shapes. (2021-02-04)

Artificial skin brings robots closer to 'touching' human lives
Modern-day robots are often required to interact with humans intelligently and efficiently, which can be enabled by providing them the ability to perceive touch. However, previous attempts at mimicking human skin have involved bulky and complex electronics, wiring, and a risk of damage. In a recent study, researchers from Japan sidestep these difficulties by constructing a 3D vision-guided artificial skin that enables tactile sensing with high performance, opening doors to innumerable applications in medicine, healthcare, and industry. (2021-02-03)

Pioneering technique paves way for fast and cheap fabrication of rapid medical diagnostic tools
New technology developed by the University of Bristol has the potential to accelerate uptake and development of on-chip diagnostic techniques in parts of the world where rapid diagnoses are desperately needed to improve public health, mortality and morbidity. (2021-02-03)

Dynamic 3D printing process features a light-driven twist
The speed of light has come to 3D printing. Northwestern University engineers have developed a new method that uses light to improve 3D printing speed and precision while also, in combination with a high-precision robot arm, providing the freedom to move, rotate or dilate each layer as the structure is being built. The method introduces the 'on-the-fly' ability to manipulate the original design layer by layer and pivot the printing direction without recreating the model. (2021-02-03)

Biomedical basis of the Barker hypothesis uncovered
A research group at Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and the University of Bern has published an extensive study on prenatal causes of kidney disease in adults in Nature Communications. The findings reveal that the serum protein fetuin-A plays a key role in attenuating local inflammation and microcalcifications in the fetal kidney, which have consequences for kidney function later in adulthood. The study results provide indications for clinical use of fetuin-A in kidney diseases. (2021-02-02)

Generation of conjunctivae in a dish
Researchers from Osaka University generated functional conjunctival tissue in a dish. By identifying the protein epidermal growth factor and keratinocyte growth factor for the development and maturation of conjunctival cells, respectively, they showed functional, mucin-producing conjunctival tissues can be formed from human induced pluripotent stem cells. This study could help with identifying novel drugs for dry eye syndrome and could further open new avenues for regenerative therapies. (2021-02-02)

Textile sensor patch could detect pressure points for amputees
A soft, flexible sensor system created with electrically conductive yarns could help map problematic pressure points in the socket of an amputee's prosthetic limb, researchers from North Carolina State University report in a new study. (2021-02-02)

A show of force: Novel polymer that toughens up and changes color upon mechanical stress
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) developed a polymer whose properties change markedly after being exposed to mechanical stress. In bulk form, the mechano-responsive polymer shows color changing, fluorescence, and self-strengthening abilities even under simple compression or extension. These fundamental findings are unprecedented in the field of mechanochemistry and could pave the way for numerous applications in materials science. (2021-02-02)

Wearable sensor monitors health, administers drugs using saliva and tears
A new kind of wearable health device would deliver real-time medical data to those with eye or mouth diseases, according to Huanyu 'Larry' Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Career Development Professor in the Penn State Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics (ESM). (2021-02-01)

Wirelessly rechargeable soft brain implant controls brain cells
Researchers have invented a smartphone-controlled soft brain implant that can be recharged wirelessly from outside the body. It enables long-term neural circuit manipulation without the need for periodic disruptive surgeries to replace the battery of the implant. Scientists believe this technology can help uncover and treat psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as addiction, depression, and Parkinson's. (2021-01-26)

Scientists use a novel ink to 3D print 'bone' with living cells
3D printers may one day become a permanent fixture of the operating theatre after UNSW scientists showed they could print bone-like structures containing living cells. (2021-01-25)

3-D printed Biomesh minimizes hernia repair complications
A newly-designed 3D-printed Biomesh effectively minimized postsurgical complications of hernia repair in an animal model. (2021-01-25)

New variety of paintbrush lily developed by a novel plant tissue culture technique
Scientists at Hokkaido University and Chiba University have developed simultaneous triploid and hexaploid varieties of Haemanthus albiflos by the application of endosperm culture, thus extending the use of this technique. (2021-01-22)

Palaeontology: Fossil burrows point to ancient seafloor colonization by giant marine worms
Giant ambush-predator worms, possible ancestors of the 'bobbit worm', may have colonized the seafloor of the Eurasian continent around 20 million years ago. The findings, based on the reconstruction of large, L-shaped burrows from layers of seafloor dating back to the Miocene (23 million to 5.3 million years ago) of northeast Taiwan, are reported in Scientific Reports this week. (2021-01-21)

Giant sand worm discovery proves truth is stranger than fiction
Simon Fraser University researchers have found evidence that large ambush-predatory worms--some as long as two metres--roamed the ocean floor near Taiwan over 20 million years ago. (2021-01-21)

Squid-inspired robot swims with nature's most efficient marine animals
Scientists at the University of Southampton and University of Edinburgh have developed a flexible underwater robot that can propel itself through water in the same style as nature's most efficient swimmer - the Aurelia aurita jellyfish. (2021-01-20)

Eggs reveal what may happen to brain on impact
Our brains consist of soft matter bathed in watery cerebrospinal fluid inside a hard skull, and in Physics of Fluids, researchers describe studying another system with the same features, an egg, to search for answers about concussions. Considering that in most concussive brain injuries, the skull does not break, they wanted to find out if it was possible to break or deform the egg yolk without breaking the eggshell. (2021-01-19)

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