Current South Pole News and Events

Current South Pole News and Events, South Pole News Articles.
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CDDEP report highlights tremendous burden from infectious diseases in SEAR countries
Washington, DC / New Delhi, India - Researchers at CDDEP, in collaboration with leading experts in the field, have produced the ''Infectious Diseases in the South-East Asia Region'' report, which examines cross-boundary challenges in communicable disease control in countries in the South-and South-East Asia region. The report emphasizes infectious diseases related to other sources of disease burden in the region and communicates overall trends in the health and economic burden they impose. (2021-02-23)

Ghost particle from shredded star reveals cosmic particle accelerator
Tracing back a ghostly particle to a shredded star, scientists have uncovered a gigantic cosmic particle accelerator. The subatomic particle was hurled towards Earth after the doomed star came too close to the supermassive black hole at the centre of its home galaxy and was ripped apart, as the team led by DESY scientist Robert Stein reports in the journal Nature Astronomy. (2021-02-22)

Scientists link star-shredding event to origins of universe's highest-energy particles
A team of scientists has detected the presence of a high-energy neutrino in the wake of a star's destruction as it is consumed by a black hole. This discovery sheds new light on the origins of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays--the highest energy particles in the Universe. (2021-02-22)

42,000-year-old trees allow more accurate analysis of last Earth's magnetic field reversal
The last complete reversal of the Earth's magnetic field, the so-called Laschamps event, took place 42,000 years ago. Radiocarbon analyses of the remains of kauri trees from New Zealand now make it possible for the first time to precisely time and analyse this event and its associated effects, as well as to calibrate geological archives such as sediment and ice cores from this period. Simulations based on this show considerable effects in the Earth's atmosphere. (2021-02-19)

Migratory birds track climate across the year
As climate change takes hold across the Americas, some areas will get wetter, and others will get hotter and drier. A new study of the yellow warbler, a widespread migratory songbird, shows that individuals have the same climatic preferences across their migratory range. (2021-02-18)

Ancient relic points to a turning point in Earth's history 42,000 years ago
The temporary breakdown of Earth's magnetic field 42,000 years ago sparked major climate shifts that led to global environmental change and mass extinctions, a new international study co-led by UNSW Sydney and the South Australian Museum shows. (2021-02-18)

Skoltech's recent achievement takes us one step closer to Mars
Scientists have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that enables processing images from autonomous greenhouses, monitoring plant growth, and automating the cultivation process. In their article, they share the experience in the scope of controlled-environment agriculture automation in the Antarctic station greenhouse facility called EDEN ISS. (2021-02-17)

COVID-19 linked to potentially dangerous eye abnormalities
Researchers using MRI have found significant abnormalities in the eyes of some people with severe COVID-19, according to a new study. The study results support the need for eye screening in these patients to provide appropriate treatment and management of potentially severe ophthalmological manifestations of COVID-19. (2021-02-16)

Cells use concentration gradients as a compass
Biophysicists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munch have developed a new theory, which accounts for the observation that cells can perceive their own shapes, and use this information to direct the distribution of proteins inside the cell. (2021-02-16)

Observations at a shed light on how hard coral survives without light
French researchers have studied for the first time the distribution of hard corals in the French Polynesian archipelago, from the surface to 120 metres deep. As the amount of light decreases, this coral associates with other filamentous algae, in addition to zooxanthellae, which become inserted into its skeleton. These algae, the only ones found at this depth, could therefore play an important role in the coral's adaptation to life at depth. (2021-02-16)

Slow motion precursors give earthquakes the fast slip
At a glacier near the South Pole, earth scientists have found evidence of a quiet, slow-motion fault slip that triggers strong, fast-slip earthquakes many miles away, according to Cornell University research published in Science Advances. (2021-02-16)

Challenge of the summer rainfall forecast skill in China: A possible solution
The Mongolian Cyclone is a major meteorological driving force across southeast Asia. This cyclone is known for transporting aerosols, affecting where precipitation develops. Meteorologists are seeking ways to improve seasonal prediction of the relationship between the Mongolian cyclone and South Asia high. These features are major components of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and the corresponding heavy rain events. New research suggests that analyzing these phenomena in the upper-level atmosphere will enhance the summer rainfall forecast skill in China. (2021-02-16)

CO2 dip may have helped dinosaurs walk from South America to Greenland
A new study identifies a climate phenomenon that may have helped sauropodomorphs spread northward across the Pangea supercontinent. (2021-02-15)

Genetic markers show Pacific albacore intermingle across equator
Analyzing thousands of genetic markers in albacore tuna from the Pacific Ocean, researchers at Oregon State University have learned that just seven dozen of those markers are needed to determine which side of the equator a fish comes from. (2021-02-10)

Collapsed glaciers increase third pole uncertainties: Downstream lakes may merge within a decade
According to researchers from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research (ITP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, meltwater from ice avalanches has been filling downstream lakes in a way that may cause previously separated lakes to merge within the next decade, thus disrupting the function of ecosystems in the region. (2021-02-09)

Better understanding the reasons behind Arctic amplified warming
EPFL professor Julia Schmale is calling on scientists to conduct dedicated process studies and to share their data and research findings on Arctic warming. She stresses the importance of studying how aerosols and clouds interact, as these highly complex and poorly understood mechanisms play a key role in climate change, but are also strongly affected by it. According to her, the region is in rapid transition and scientists need to act to not run behind. (2021-02-08)

Clients of female sex workers should be targeted for HIV prevention and treatment in South Africa
The researchers found that over a ten-year period (2010-19), sex between female sex workers and their paying clients contributed 6.9 per cent of new HIV infections, while sex between clients with their non-paying partners contributed 41.9 per cent (2021-02-04)

CU Denver researcher studies international cooperation in fighting COVID-19
A University of Colorado Denver researcher released a study looking at how a more global approach would have far-reaching societal benefits in tackling the COVID-19 pandemic. (2021-02-02)

Astronomers spot bizarre activity from one of the strongest magnets in the Universe
Astronomers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) and CSIRO have just observed bizarre, never-seen-before behaviour from a 'radio-loud' magnetar--a rare type of neutron star and one of the strongest magnets in the Universe. Their new findings, published today in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS), suggest magnetars have more complex magnetic fields than previously thought - which may challenge theories of how they are born and evolve over time. (2021-02-01)

Arctic warming and diminishing sea ice are influencing the atmosphere
Researchers of the Institute for Atmospheric and Earth system research at the University of Helsinki have resolved for the first time, how the environment affects the formation of nanoparticles in the Arctic. The results give additional insight into the future of melting sea ice and the Arctic atmosphere. Until recent studies, the molecular processes of particle formation in the high Arctic remained a mystery. (2021-01-29)

The changing paradigm of next-generation semiconductor memory development
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST) has announced that the research team led by Dr. Kim Kyoung-Whan at the Center for Spintronics has proposed a new principle about spin memory devices, which are next-generation memory devices. This breakthrough presents new applicability that is different from the existing paradigm. (2021-01-12)

Groundwater drives rapid erosion of the Canterbury coastline, New Zealand
Groundwater flow and seepage can form large gullies along coastal cliffs in the matter of days, it has been discovered. (2021-01-12)

Asian water towers on tighter budget despite a warmer and wetter climate
Asian Water Towers will have to struggle to quench the thirst of downstream communities despite more river runoff brought on by a warmer climate, according to a recent study led by the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences. (2021-01-11)

New hard disk write head analytical technology can increase hard disk capacities
Using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8 - a large-scale synchrotron radiation facility - Tohoku University, Toshiba Corporation, and the Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI) have successfully imaged the magnetization dynamics of a hard disk drive (HDD) write head for the first time, with a precision of one ten-billionth of a second. The method makes possible precise analysis of write head operations, accelerating the development of the next-generation write heads and further increasing HDD capacity. (2021-01-07)

Gates Foundation helps UC study sexual health of South African youth
An important new finding by University of Cincinnati researchers could help slow the transmission of HIV/AIDS and reduce pregnancies among adolescent girls in rural South Africa. (2020-12-22)

Change in global precipitation patterns as a result of climate change
The Earth's climate system is largely determined by the differences in temperature between the tropics and the poles. Global warming is likely to cause global atmospheric circulation to change and progressively revert to a situation similar to that of 5,000 to 10,000 years ago. This is the conclusion of a study published in Nature Communications. (2020-12-17)

Engineers develop soft robotic gripper
Scientists often look to nature for cues when designing robots - some robots mimic human hands while others simulate the actions of octopus arms or inchworms. Now, researchers in the University of Georgia College of Engineering have designed a new soft robotic gripper that draws inspiration from an unusual source: pole beans. (2020-12-15)

New permafrost thermal stability map better describes the permafrost on the Tibetan Plateau
A permafrost thermal stability map derived from the predicted mean annual ground temperature (MAGT) by integrating multi-remotely sensed indexes and in situ mean annual ground temperature from 237 boreholes on the Tibetan Plateau by using a machine learning model. This map can be used for engineering planning and design, ecosystem management, and evaluation of the permafrost change in the future on the Third Pole as a baseline. (2020-12-15)

First peer-reviewed results of phase 3 human trials of Oxford vaccine show efficacy
Wits University scientists were amongst the co-authors who published the first peer-reviewed results of phase 3 human trials of the Oxford/AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine, in prestigious scientific journal The Lancet, on 8 December. Wits leads the SA leg of the Oxford Covid-19 vaccine trials. (2020-12-09)

"Birthday" of the roof of the world recalibrated
A recent study led by researchers from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research (ITP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) proves, through fossil analysis, that much of the Third Pole only grew to its modern height over the past 10 million to 20 million years, rather than 40 million years ago (Ma) as previously inferred. (2020-12-09)

Image-based navigation could help spacecraft safely land on the moon
In research recently published in the AIAA Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, a multidisciplinary team of engineers demonstrated how a series of lunar images can be used to infer the direction that a spacecraft is moving. This technique, sometimes called visual odometry, allows navigation information to be gathered even when a good map isn't available. The goal is to allow spacecraft to more accurately target and land at a specific location on the moon without requiring a complete map of its surface. (2020-12-07)

Evidence of the interconnectedness of global climate
The analysis, published in Nature, shows for the first time that changes in the Antarctic ice sheet were caused by the melting of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere. The influence was driven by sea-level changes caused by the melting ice in the north during the past 40,000 years. (2020-11-25)

Shift in atmospheric rivers could affect Antarctic sea ice, glaciers
Weather systems responsible for transporting moisture from the tropics to temperate regions in the Southern Hemisphere have been gradually shifting toward the South Pole for the past 40 years, a trend which could lead to increased rates of ice melt in Antarctica, according to new research published in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters. (2020-11-23)

A long distance connection: polar climate affects trade wind strength in tropics
The impact of sea surface temperature variations in the tropical Pacific on global climate has long been recognized. For instance, the episodic warming of the tropical Pacific during El NiƱo events causes melt of sea ice in far-reaching parts of the Southern Ocean via its effect on the global atmospheric circulation. A new study, published this week in the journal Science Advances by an international team, demonstrates that the opposite pathway exists as well. (2020-11-20)

Blue whales return to South Georgia after near extinction
An international research team led by UK scientists has revealed the return of critically endangered Antarctic blue whales to the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia, 50 years after whaling all but wiped them out. The new study follows recent research that humpback whales are also returning to the region. (2020-11-19)

How fishermen have adapted to change over the past 35+ years
An analysis published in Fish and Fisheries notes that marine fisheries are increasingly exposed to external drivers of social and ecological change, and recent changes have had different impacts upon the livelihood strategies favored by fishermen based on the size of their boats. (2020-11-18)

How ancient dust from the sea floor helps to explain climate history
Iron-containing dust can fuel ocean productivity. Researchers now show that dust travelled a long way in the South Pacific Region during the last Ice Age. Based on analyses of sediment cores they identified the area that is now north-west Argentina as primary source of dust. The results help explain glacial cooling and climate history. (2020-11-09)

A new candidate material for quantum spin liquids
Using a unique material, EPFL scientists have been able to design and study an unusual state of matter, the Quantum Spin Liquid. The work has significant implications for future technologies, from quantum computing to superconductivity and spintronics. (2020-11-06)

Brown carbon 'tarballs' detected in Himalayan atmosphere
Some people refer to the Himalaya-Tibetan Plateau as the ''third pole'' because the region has the largest reserve of glacial snow and ice outside of the north and south poles. The glaciers, which are extremely sensitive to climate change and human influence, have been retreating over the past decade. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology Letters have detected light-absorbing ''tarballs'' in the Himalayan atmosphere, which could contribute to glacial melt. (2020-11-04)

Convection-permitting modelling improves simulated precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau
A China-UK research team explains the possible reasons for excessive precipitation over the TP in the mesoscale convection-parameterized models. (2020-11-04)

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