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Current Space Shuttle News and Events, Space Shuttle News Articles.
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Reducing the risk of space debris collision
In a new paper published in EPJ Special Topics, authors Antônio Delson Conceição de Jesus and Gabriel Luiz F. Santos, from the State University of Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brazil, model the complex rendezvous manoeuvres a tug vehicle clearing space debris would have to undergo to mitigate the risk of collision at the moment of coupling. (2020-06-18)

University of Melbourne to build and launch innovative satellite
Funding helps develop cutting edge space capabilities in Australia and collaboration with multiple Australian space industry companies and the Italian Space Agency (2020-06-16)

New analysis of human portraits reveals shift in culture, cognition
Human cognition and cultural norms have changed the composition of human portraits, according to a new analysis of European paintings from the 15th to the 20th century. (2020-06-15)

Speed of space storms key to protecting astronauts and satellites from radiation
Measuring the speed of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) as they erupt from the sun, in addition to their size, found to be crucial in providing accurate early warnings that keep astronauts and technology safe. (2020-06-10)

New 'sun clock' quantifies extreme space weather switch on/off
Extreme space weather events can significantly impact systems such as satellites, communications systems, power distribution and aviation. They are driven by solar activity which is known to have an irregular but roughly 11 year cycle. By devising a new, regular 'sun clock', researchers have found that the switch on and off of periods of high solar activity is quite sharp, and are able to determine the switch on/off times. (2020-06-10)

A method has been developed to study the 'traces' of coronal mass ejections at the Sun.
Scientists at Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (skoltech), together with colleagues from the Karl-Franzens University of Graz and the Kanzelhoehe Observatory (Austria) developed an automatic method for detecting 'coronal dimmings', or 'traces' of coronal mass ejections at the Sun, and also proved that they are reliable indicators of the early diagnosis of powerful emissions of energy from the atmosphere of the Sun, traveling to Earth at great speed. (2020-06-10)

Black hole's heart still beating
The first confirmed heartbeat of a supermassive black hole is still going strong more than ten years after first being observed. (2020-06-09)

Construction of new learning spaces calls for interaction between stakeholders and development of school's operational culture
New modern physical school spaces require open communication between stakeholders in order to be transformed into meaningful learning environments, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. Pre-existing pedagogies or good practices as such cannot be transferred from one space to another. (2020-06-04)

Solar Ring mission: A new concept of space exploration for understanding Sun and the inner heliosphere
A new concept of space exploration, Solar Ring mission, is proposed to deploy six spacecraft in the ecliptic plane to observe the Sun and interplanetary space surrounding our planets. The successful accomplishment of the mission will advance our understanding of the space environment that hold our life and enhance our capability in expanding the next new territory of human. The article published in Sci. China Tech. Sci. gives the details of the mission concept. (2020-06-01)

Solution to century-old math problem could predict transmission of infectious diseases
A Bristol academic has achieved a milestone in statistical/mathematical physics by solving a 100-year-old physics problem -- the discrete diffusion equation in finite space. (2020-05-29)

Terrestrial bacteria can grow on nutrients from space
As inevitable fellow travellers on the bodies of astronauts, spaceships, or equipment, terrestrial microorganisms will undoubtedly come into contact with extraterrestrial environments. Researchers from the Radboudumc describe in an article in Astrobiology that bacteria can survive on an 'extraterrestrial diet', which affected their pathogenic potential. (2020-05-26)

Solving the space junk problem
Aging satellites and space debris crowd low-Earth orbit, and launching new satellites adds to the collision risk. The most effective way to solve the space junk problem, according to a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is not to capture debris or deorbit old satellites: it's an international agreement to charge operators 'orbital-use fees' for every satellite put into orbit. (2020-05-25)

Going nuclear on the moon and Mars
It might sound like science fiction, but scientists are preparing to build colonies on the moon and, eventually, Mars. With NASA planning its next human mission to the moon in 2024, researchers are looking for options to power settlements on the lunar surface. According to a new article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, nuclear fission reactors have emerged as top candidates to generate electricity in space.  (2020-05-20)

NASA-NOAA satellite catches post-tropical storm Arthur's end
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the western North Atlantic Ocean and provided forecasters with a visible image of Post Tropical Storm Arthur. (2020-05-20)

New algorithm predicts optimal materials among all possible compounds
Skoltech researchers have offered a solution to the problem of searching for materials with required properties among all possible combinations of chemical elements. These combinations are virtually endless, and each has an infinite multitude of possible crystal structures; it is not feasible to test them all and choose the best option (for instance, the hardest compound) either in an experiment or in silico. (2020-05-14)

Loss of green space in India shown to be associated with higher cardiometabolic risk
Study is one of the first to analyse the relationship between urban development and health in a low- or middle-income country. (2020-05-11)

Graphene sets sail in microgravity
ESA-backed researchers demonstrate the laser-propulsion of graphene sails in microgravity. The light sails use a scalable micro-membrane design that minimizes their mass and hence increases their thrust upon light irradiation. To demonstrate the new sail concept, the scientists gained access to ZARM Drop Tower. There, the sail prototypes were set in vacuum and microgravity, and 1W-lasers caused their acceleration up to 1 m/s2. (2020-05-06)

Study reveals how spaceflight affects risk of blood clots in female astronauts
A study of female astronauts has assessed the risk of blood clots associated with spaceflight. The study, published in Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance, in collaboration with King's College London, the Centre for Space Medicine Baylor College of Medicine, NASA Johnson Space Centre and the International Space University, examines the potential risk factors for developing a blood clot (venous thromboembolism) in space. (2020-05-05)

Hubble watches comet ATLAS disintegrate into more than 2 dozen pieces
These two Hubble Space Telescope images of comet C/2019 Y4 (ATLAS), taken on April 20 and 23, 2020, provide the sharpest views yet of the breakup of the fragile comet. (2020-04-28)

'Ethnic spaces' make minority students feel at home on campus
New research by the University of Washington and the University of Exeter examined the value that college students -- of many races -- place on ethnic cultural centers. (2020-04-27)

Hubble marks 30 years in space with tapestry of blazing starbirth
NASA is celebrating the Hubble Space Telescope's 30 years of unlocking the beauty and mystery of space by unveiling a stunning new portrait of a firestorm of starbirth in a neighboring galaxy. The image is nicknamed the ;Cosmic Reef,' because it resembles an undersea world. (2020-04-24)

Hubble celebrates its 30th anniversary with a tapestry of blazing starbirth
Hubble Space Telescope's iconic images and scientific breakthroughs have redefined our view of the universe. To commemorate three decades of scientific discoveries, this image is one of the most photogenic examples of the many turbulent stellar nurseries the telescope has observed during its 30-year lifetime. (2020-04-24)

Researchers use 'hot Jupiter' data to mine exoplanet chemistry
After spotting a curious pattern in scientific papers -- they described exoplanets as being cooler than expected -- Cornell University astronomers have improved a mathematical model to accurately gauge the temperatures of planets from solar systems hundreds of light-years away. (2020-04-23)

3D printing and moon dust: an astronaut's kit for future space exploration?
One of the major challenges related to space exploration is the development of production technologies capable of exploiting the few resources available in extra-terrestrial environment. Laser 3D printing of lunar dust may be the answer to such queries. Reduction of elevated supply chain costs and times connected to space exploration were amongst the main drivers which brought to the investigation of the Politecnico di Milano to on the feasibility of 3D printing a lunar regolith simulant. (2020-04-16)

Scientists develop high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries
Recently, research groups led by Prof. LIU Jian and Prof. WU Zhongshuai from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed Fe1-xS-decorated mesoporous carbon spheres as the nanoreactor, which can be applied as lithium-sulfur battery cathode. (2020-04-16)

Technique offers path for biomanufacturing medicines during space flights
Research published today in Nature Microgravity used an Earth-bound simulator of the space station instrument to grow E. coli, demonstrating that it can be nurtured with methods that promise to be more suitable for space travel than existing alternatives. (2020-04-10)

Astronaut urine to build moon bases
The modules that the major space agencies plan to erect on the Moon could incorporate an element contributed by the human colonizers themselves: the urea in their pee. European researchers have found that it could be used as a plasticizer in the concrete of the structures. (2020-03-27)

Investigating spaceflight-associated changes in astronauts
Head congestion is one of the most common symptoms experienced by astronauts during spaceflight. This observational study examined preflight and postflight head magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of 35 astronauts who participated in either a short-duration (30 days or less) Space Shuttle mission or a long-duration (greater than 30 days) International Space Station mission. (2020-03-26)

X-ray observations of Milky Way's halo rule out models of dark matter decay
An unidentified X-ray signature recently observed in nearby galaxies and galaxy clusters is not due to decay of dark matter, researchers report. (2020-03-26)

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Herold's eye
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured an image of a well-developed Tropical Cyclone Herold at hurricane strength, east of Madagascar. (2020-03-16)

Scientists have discovered the origins of the building blocks of life
Rutgers researchers have discovered the origins of the protein structures responsible for metabolism: simple molecules that powered early life on Earth and serve as chemical signals that NASA could use to search for life on other planets. Their study, which predicts what the earliest proteins looked like 3.5 billion to 2.5 billion years ago, is published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2020-03-16)

Control of the fatty acid synthase
Max Planck researchers discover first protein that regulates fatty acid synthase (2020-03-13)

NASA's Terra Satellite observes development of Tropical Storm 22S
NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and provided forecasters with a visible image of newly formed Tropical Storm 22S, located near northeastern Madagascar. (2020-03-13)

Producing human tissue in space
The University of Zurich has sent adult human stem cells to the International Space Station (ISS). Researchers from UZH Space Hub will explore the production of human tissue in weightlessness. (2020-03-07)

Caltech & JPL launch hybrid high rate quantum communication systems
In the Caltech-JPL tradition of intermixing in unique ways fundamental science, technology and engineering they develop a collaborative multi-disciplinary cross-agency research program to advance and accelerate scalable hybrid quantum networking and communications technologies. (2020-03-06)

Study reveals how green space can reduce violent crime
Researchers identified patterns that can inform public policy, guide urban design and promote neighborhoods that are safe and low in crime. (2020-02-27)

New patented invention stabilizes, rotates satellites
Many satellites are in space to take photos. But a vibrating satellite, like a camera in shaky hands, can't get a sharp image. Pointing it at a precise location to take a photo or perform another task, is another important function requiring accuracy. Vedant, an aerospace engineering doctoral student at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign was developing a way to eliminate vibrations on a satellite when he discovered his invention could also rotate the satellite. (2020-02-26)

Bacteria on the International Space Station no more dangerous than earthbound strains
Two particularly tenacious species of bacteria have colonized the potable water dispenser aboard the International Space Station (ISS), but a new study suggests that they are no more dangerous than closely related strains on Earth. Aubrie O'Rourke of the J. Craig Venter Institute and colleagues report these findings in a new paper published February 19, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. (2020-02-19)

Simple, fuel-efficient rocket engine could enable cheaper, lighter spacecraft
University of Washington researchers have developed a mathematical model that describes how rotating detonation engines work. (2020-02-18)

Kazan University's telescope assists in discovering a binary star system
In this article, a group of Polish scientists, based on international cooperative observations and their own theoretical calculations, built a geometric picture of the occurrence of the Gaia16aye microlensing phenomenon. (2020-02-13)

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