Current Spectrometer News and Events

Current Spectrometer News and Events, Spectrometer News Articles.
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Monitoring the body's fat burning by breath
Your breath holds the key to monitoring fat burning, and now a research group from Tohoku University has created a compact and low-cost device that can measure how our body metabolizes fat. (2021-02-10)

3D-printed spectrometer on a 100 x100 μm² footprint
The miniaturisation of spectroscopic measurement devices opens novel information channels in medical science or consumer electronics. Scientists of the University of Stuttgart, Germany, developed a 3D-printed miniature spectrometer with a volume of 100 × 100 × 300 μm³ and a spectral resolution of up to 10 nm in the visible range. This spectrometer can be manufactured directly onto camera sensors, and a parallel arrangement allows for quick (''snapshot'') and low profile, highly customizable hyperspectral cameras. (2021-02-08)

New ion trap to create the world's most accurate mass spectrometer
Mass spectrometers are widely used to analyze highly complex chemical and biological mixtures. Skoltech scientists have developed a new version of a mass spectrometer that uses rotation frequencies of ionized molecules in strong magnetic fields to measure masses with higher accuracy (FT ICR). The team has designed an ion trap that ensures the utmost resolving power in ultra-strong magnetic fields. (2021-01-28)

A vacuum-ultraviolet laser with submicrometer spot for spatially resolved photoemission spectroscopy
If vacuum ultraviolet lasers can be focused into a small beam spot, it will allow investigation of mesoscopic materials and structures and enable the manufacture of nano-objects with excellent precision. Towards this goal, Scientist in China invented a 177 nm VUV laser system that can achieve a sub-micron focal spot at a long focal length. This system can be re-equipped for usage in low-cost ARPES and might benefit condensed matter physics. (2021-01-27)

Scientists streamline process for controlling spin dynamics
Marking a major achievement in the field of spintronics, researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Yale University have demonstrated the ability to control spin dynamics in magnetic materials by altering their thickness. The study, published today in Nature Materials, could lead to smaller, more energy-efficient electronic devices. (2021-01-18)

Remote sensing data sheds light on when and how asteroid Ryugu lost its water
Rocks on Ryugu, a 'rubble pile' near-Earth asteroid recently visited by Japan's Hayabusa2 spacecraft, appear to have lost much of their water before they came together to form the asteroid, new research suggests. (2021-01-05)

Researchers discovered solid phosphorus from a comet
An international study led from the University of Turku, Finland, discovered phosphorus and fluorine in solid dust particles collected from a comet. The finding indicates that all the most important elements necessary for life may have been delivered to the Earth by comets. (2020-11-26)

Heat and dust help launch Martian water into space, scientists find
Scientists using an instrument aboard NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, or MAVEN, spacecraft have discovered that water vapor near the surface of the Red Planet is lofted higher into the atmosphere than anyone expected was possible. (2020-11-13)

Optoelectronic detectors capable of perceiving light intensity and color
Current optoelectronic detectors are only able to perceive light intensities. Although multi-photosensor spectrometers are capable of perceiving intensity and colour, they require chip-level assembly and can generate redundant signals. Scientists in China have created a low cost, flexible device consists of a photoactive layer made from a semiconductor with a small bandgap and a photosensing layer made from a semiconductor with gradient bandgaps, which is capable of detecting light intensity and perceiving colour. (2020-11-11)

Researchers shrink imaging spectrometer without compromising performance
Researchers have developed a new imaging spectrometer that is much lighter and smaller than state-of-the-art instruments while maintaining the same high level of performance. Because of its small size and modular design, the new instrument is poised to bring this advanced analytical technique to airborne vehicles and even planetary exploration missions. (2020-11-05)

Turning excess noise into signal
Excess noise fluctuations of light are widely considered to be detrimental in optics and photonics. Here, scientists from the United States report that incoherent excess noise spectrally encodes broadband light, providing a unique tool to characterize spectrometers. With this tool, they improve spectrometer performance in visible light Optical Coherence Tomography. The resulting retinal images reveal a new and subtle photoreceptor band. This work motivates the search for other useful applications of excess noise. (2020-10-14)

New method uses noise to make spectrometers more accurate
Optical spectrometers are instruments with a wide variety of uses. By measuring the intensity of light across different wavelengths, they can be used to image tissues or measure the chemical composition of everything from a distant galaxy to a leaf. Now researchers at the UC Davis Department of Biomedical Engineering have come up a with a new, rapid method for characterizing and calibrating spectrometers, based on how they respond to ''noise.'' (2020-10-13)

Promising breath-test for cancer
The global quest to use a person's breath analysis for rapid, inexpensive and accurate early-stage testing for cancer and other diseases has taken a leap forward. In a new paper in the British Journal of Cancer, Flinders University researchers have reported significant progress in developing a method to test exhaled breath profiles which accurately differentiate head and neck cancer from non-cancer patients. (2020-10-05)

SwRI instruments aboard Rosetta help detect unexpected ultraviolet aurora at a comet
Data from Southwest Research Institute-led instruments aboard ESA's Rosetta spacecraft have helped reveal auroral emissions in the far ultraviolet around a comet for the first time. (2020-09-21)

Comet Chury's ultraviolet aurora
On Earth, auroras, also called northern lights, have always fascinated people. An international consortium involving the University of Bern has now discovered such auroras in the ultraviolet wavelength range at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, Chury for short. This phenomenon was detected thanks to the analysis of data from the European Space Agency ESA's Rosetta mission. (2020-09-21)

Researchers demonstrate record speed with advanced spectroscopy technique
Researchers have developed an advanced spectrometer that can acquire data with exceptionally high speed. The new spectrometer could be useful for a variety of applications including remote sensing, real-time biological imaging and machine vision. (2020-09-16)

Structure of 'immortality protein' now better understood
A key role in studying the telomerase of Hansenula polymorpha was played by KFU's nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. (2020-09-10)

Rare encounters between cosmic heavyweights
Astronomers using Maunakea Observatories - Subaru Telescope, W. M. Keck Observatory, and Gemini Observatory - have discovered three pairs of merging galaxies. Each of the galaxies contain a supermassive black hole that's feasting on material surrounding it, creating a phenomenon called a quasar. These luminous dual quasars are rare; only about 0.3% of all known quasars have two supermassive black holes that are on a collision course with each other. (2020-08-26)

Disparities in a common air pollutant are visible from space
As a global center for petrochemical manufacturing, Houston, Texas, experiences some of the worst air quality in the country, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Evidence suggests that air pollution disproportionately affects low-income, non-white and Hispanic residents, but it's difficult to directly observe differences in pollutants between neighborhoods. Now, researchers reporting in Environmental Science & Technology have used airplanes and a satellite to uncover disparities in nitrogen dioxide amounts in the atmosphere above Houston. (2020-08-05)

Study reveals composition of 'gel-like' substance discovered by Chang'e-4 rover on moon's far side
A research team led by Prof. DI Kaichang from the Aerospace Information Research Institute (AIR) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators analyzed the substance discovered by Chang'e-4 rover on Moon's far side in detail and revealed its composition. (2020-07-21)

Fluorine enables separation-free 'chiral chromatographic analysis'
Researchers from the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently developed a new platform for rapid chiral analysis, producing chromatogram-like output without the need for separation. (2020-07-02)

SwRI scientists demonstrate speed, precision of in situ planetary dating device
Southwest Research Institute scientists have increased the speed and accuracy of a laboratory-scale instrument for determining the age of planetary specimens onsite. The team is progressively miniaturizing the Chemistry, Organics and Dating Experiment (CODEX) instrument to reach a size suitable for spaceflight and lander missions. (2020-06-29)

A single proton can make a heck of a difference
Scientists from the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science and collaborators have shown that knocking out a single proton from a fluorine nucleus -- transforming it into a neutron-rich isotope of oxygen -- can have a major effect on the state of the nucleus. (2020-05-28)

Argonne and CERN weigh in on the origin of heavy elements
Nuclear physicists from Argonne National Laboratory led an international physics experiment conducted at CERN that utilizes novel techniques developed at Argonne to study the nature and origin of heavy elements in the universe. (2020-03-30)

Bricks can act as 'cameras' for characterizing past presence of radioactive materials
Researchers have developed a technique for determining the historical location and distribution of radioactive materials, such as weapons grade plutonium. The technique may allow them to use common building materials, such as bricks, as a three-dimensional 'camera,' relying on residual gamma radiation signatures to take a snapshot of radioactive materials even after they've been removed from a location. (2020-03-26)

Study suggests LEGO bricks could survive in ocean for up to 1,300 years
By measuring the mass of individual bricks found on beaches against equivalent unused pieces and the age of blocks obtained from storage, researchers estimated that the items could endure for anywhere between 100 and 1,300 years (2020-03-16)

First-time direct proof of chemical reactions in particulates
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have developed a new method to analyse particulate matter more precisely than ever before. With its help, they disproved an established doctrine: that molecules in aerosols undergo no further chemical transformations because they are enclosed in other suspended particulate matter. Their findings will help to improve the understanding of global processes involved in cloud formation and air pollution and to refine the corresponding models. (2020-03-13)

Novel blood test points to risk of weight gain and diabetes
The blood test method makes use of machine learning and can be used to predict whether patients will put on weight, unless they change their habits. The project was conducted in Brazil with funding from FAPESP. (2020-03-10)

DNA sugars characterised in unprecedented resolution, atom by atom
For the cover of its latest issue the ACS Central Science journal has selected a piece of work conducted by the Spectroscopy Group of the UPV/EHU's Department of Physical Chemistry, and the Biofisika Institute (CSIC - UPV/EHU). In this research the structure of the sugars forming part of DNA have for the first time been isolated and specified with atomic-level resolution. The necessary instruments were developed for this purpose and that was how unprecedented resolution was achieved. (2020-03-04)

New UCL technology analyses single cancer cells in lab grown tumours
New technology developed at UCL is, for the first time, enabling cancer scientists to analyse the individual behaviour of millions of different cells living inside lab-grown tumours -- a breakthrough which could lead to new personalised cancer treatments. (2020-02-17)

Status report: OSIRIS-REx completes closest flyover of sample site nightingale
OSIRIS-REx successfully executed a 0.4-mile (620-m) flyover of site Nightingale yesterday as part of the mission's Reconnaissance B phase activities. (2020-01-22)

The salt of the comet
Under the leadership of astrophysicist Kathrin Altwegg, Bernese researchers have found an explanation for why very little nitrogen could previously be accounted for in the nebulous covering of comets: the building block for life predominantly occurs in the form of ammonium salts, the occurrence of which could not previously be measured. The salts may be a further indication that comet impacts may have made life on Earth possible in the first place. (2020-01-20)

Watching complex molecules at work
A new method of infrared spectroscopy developed at BESSY II makes single-measurement observation and analysis of very fast as well as irreversible reaction mechanisms in molecules feasible for the first time. Previously, thousands of such reactions have had to be run and measured for this purpose. The research team has now used the new device to investigate how rhodopsin molecules change after activation by light -- a process that is the basis of how we see. (2020-01-14)

Combining science and design to measure our exposure to light
Daylight plays an essential role in sleep, alertness and hormone regulation. EPFL has joined forces with Geneva School of Art and Design (HEAD - Genève) to develop a wearable sensor that measures how much light an individual is exposed to along with the spectral resolution of that light. (2019-12-12)

Can 'smart toilets' be the next health data wellspring?
Wearable, smart technologies are transforming the ability to monitor and improve health, but a decidedly low-tech commodity -- the humble toilet -- may have potential to outperform them all. (2019-11-13)

New way to date rocks
A new way to date a common mineral could help pinpoint ore deposits and improve mineral exploration globally, according to University of Queensland scientists. (2019-11-03)

Shipment tracking for 'fat parcels' in the body
Without fat, nothing works in the body: These substances serve as energy suppliers and important building blocks -- including for the envelopes of living cells. Numerous diseases are related to disorders in the fat metabolism, such as obesity or cancer. Researchers from the University of Bonn are now demonstrating how the fat metabolism can be monitored down to the individual liver cell of a mouse with the greatest sensitivity. (2019-10-14)

Smaller than a coin
ETH researchers have developed a compact infrared spectrometer. It's small enough to fit on a computer chip but can still open up interesting possibilities -- in space and in everyday life. (2019-10-08)

A laser, a crystal and molecular structures
Researchers have built a new tool to study molecules using a laser, a crystal and light detectors. This new technology will reveal nature's smallest sculptures -- the structures of molecules -- with increased detail and specificity. (2019-09-27)

Preserving old bones with modern technology
A team of University of Colorado Boulder anthropologists is out to change the way that scientists study old bones damage-free. (2019-09-26)

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