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Current Sperm News and Events, Sperm News Articles.
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Study examines link between sperm quality and light from devices at night
Men might want to think twice before reaching for their smartphone at night. A new study found correlations between electronic media use at night and poor sperm quality. (2020-08-26)

Partner selection ultimately happens in the woman's reproductive tract
The female reproductive tract has the final say in human mate choice, according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland. (2020-08-19)

Surprising coral spawning features revealed
When stony corals have their renowned mass spawning events, in sync with the moon's cycle, colonies simultaneously release an underwater 'cloud' of sperm and eggs for fertilization. But how do the sperm and eggs survive several hours as plankton, given threats from predators, microbes and stresses such as warming waters? A Rutgers-led team has discovered some surprising features in coral sperm and eggs (collectively called gametes), according to a study in the journal PeerJ. (2020-08-18)

Research captures how human sperm swim in 3D
Using state-of-the-art 3D microscopy and mathematics, Dr Hermes Gadêlha from the University of Bristol, Dr Gabriel Corkidi and Dr Alberto Darszon from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, have reconstructed the movement of the sperm tail in 3D with high-precision. (2020-08-13)

Why the 'wimpy' Y chromosome hasn't evolved out of existence
The Y chromosome has shrunken drastically over 200 million years of evolution. Even those who study it have used the word ''wimpy'' to describe it, and yet it continues to stick around. An Opinion paper publishing on August 6, 2020 in the journal Trends in Genetics outlines a new theory--called the 'persistent Y hypothesis'--to explain why the Y chromosome may be more resilient than it first appears. (2020-08-06)

Completing the set: 'Coupon-collection behavior' reduces sex-ratio variation among families
A new analysis of sibling records from more than 300,000 individuals suggests that some parents continue to reproduce until they have children of both sexes. (2020-08-06)

Monkeying around: Study finds older primates father far fewer babies
Older male rhesus monkeys sire fewer offspring, even though they appear to be mating as much as younger monkeys with similarly high social status. Sperm quality or quantity, or the survival of infants, may decline with the age of the would-be father, the new study suggests. A new study from Washington University in St. Louis has implications for understanding some age-related aspects of male reproductive health in primates, including humans. (2020-08-03)

How human sperm really swim: New research challenges centuries-old assumption
A breakthrough in fertility science by researchers from Bristol and Mexico has shattered the universally accepted view of how sperm 'swim'. (2020-07-31)

Underwater robots reveal daily habits of endangered whales
Research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) has revealed the daily habits of the endangered Mediterranean sperm whale. The recordings confirmed the whales' widespread presence in the north-western Mediterranean Sea and identified a possible hotspot for sperm whale habitat in the Gulf of Lion, as well as different foraging strategies between different areas. (2020-07-29)

Overweight and obesity are associated with a low sperm quality
Researchers from the Rovira i Virgili University in collaboration with researchers from the University of Utah have carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis evaluating the association between adiposity (normal weight, overweight, obesity, and low weight) and the sperm quality. Overweight and/or obesity were associated with low semen quality parameters and underweight category was likewise associated with low sperm normal morphology. According to the researchers, this work demonstrates the importance of adiposity in semen quality. (2020-07-27)

Everything you ever wanted to know about leech sex but were afraid to ask
New research, published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, sheds light on the effects the synthetic estrogens commonly found in birth control pills have on leeches. (2020-07-21)

Label-free imaging helps predict reproductive outcomes
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have used a combination of label-free imaging and artificial intelligence to determine the potential fertility of sperm samples in cattle. The technique may help improve assisted reproductive technology in humans. (2020-07-20)

UNH scientists find faster way to count animal sperm using DNA
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have identified a quicker and less expensive way to count sperm in lobsters that could help scientists looking at any animal better understand mating, a key aspect of species survival. (2020-07-17)

Healthy offspring from testicular tissue plantation in mice: Retinoic acid key
Germ cell depletion in recipient testis has adverse effects on spermatogenesis in orthotopically transplanted testis pieces via retinoic acid insufficiency. Repetitive RA administration significantly improved donor spermatogenesis to produce healthy offspring. (2020-07-16)

New test offers clarity for couples struggling to conceive
A male fertility test based on Cornell research could help predict which men might need treatment and which couples might have success with different forms of assisted reproduction. (2020-07-16)

15-foot-long skeleton of extinct dolphin suggests parallel evolution among whales
A report in the journal Current Biology on July 9 offers a detailed description of the first nearly complete skeleton of an extinct large dolphin, discovered in what is now South Carolina. The 15-foot-long dolphin (Ankylorhiza tiedemani comb. n.) lived during the Oligocene--about 25 million years ago--and was previously known only from a partial rostrum (snout) fossil. (2020-07-09)

No NELL2, no sperm motility; novel protein is essential for male fertility
An international team of researchers has identified a chain of events that matures the sperm and triggers their motility. The findings have implications for diagnostic and therapeutic research in male infertility and male contraceptive development. (2020-07-09)

High-end microscopy refined
New details are known about an important cell structure: For the first time, two Würzburg research groups have been able to map the synaptonemal complex three-dimensionally with a resolution of 20 to 30 nanometres. (2020-07-01)

A novel sperm selection technology to increase success rates of in vitro fertilization
Motile sperm are difficult to collect with a conventional cell sorter because they are vulnerable to physical damage. A Japanese research collaboration has developed a technique using a cell sorter with microfluidic chip technology to reduce cell damage and improve in vitro fertilization rates. This research is expected to increase in vitro fertilization rates to improve production of experimental animals and livestock, and could be used as a fertility treatment in reproductive medicine. (2020-07-01)

The rate we acquire genetic mutations could help predict lifespan, fertility
Differences in the rate that genetic mutations accumulate in healthy young adults could help predict remaining lifespan in both sexes and the remaining years of fertility in women, according to University of Utah Health scientists. Their study, believed to be the first of its kind, found that young adults who acquired fewer mutations over time lived about five years longer than those who acquired them more rapidly. (2020-06-19)

Researchers discover what's behind nature's perhaps largest erection -- which is not that big
In the plant kingdom, the sexual organ of a male pollen grain grows up to a thousand times its own length as it sniffs its way forth to a female egg cell to deliver its two sperm cells. Now researchers at the University of Copenhagen have advanced the understanding of what makes pollen 'penises', called pollen tubes, grow. The newfound knowledge may prove valuable to understanding human nerve cells. (2020-06-15)

Study reveals birth defects caused by flame retardant
A new study from the University of Georgia has shown that exposure to a now-banned flame retardant can alter the genetic code in sperm, leading to major health defects in children of exposed parents. (2020-06-09)

Discovery of a novel gene involved in DNA damage repair and male fertility
A research group from the Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics (IMEG) at Kumamoto University, Japan has discovered that the gene C19ORF57 plays a critical role in meiosis. The gene appears to be related to the cause of male infertility and could be a big step forward for reproductive medicine. (2020-06-04)

New studies show how DNA crossovers can drive healthy, abnormal sperm, egg cell division
Human genetic diversity wouldn't be possible without DNA crossovers in egg and sperm cells. Two studies from Harvard Medical School provide new insights into how crossovers go right--and wrong, leading to infertility, miscarriages and birth defects. (2020-06-04)

Novel switch protein that 'turns on' sperm for fertilization
Researchers from Osaka University and Baylor College of Medicine discovered a signaling cascade in which the testicular protein NELL2 travels through the lumen to induce differentiation of the epididymis, secretion of the protease OVCH2, and subsequent sperm maturation. These findings will help in diagnosis and pharmacological research into infertility and male contraceptives. The study illustrates an intriguing lumicrine or transluminal signaling route that could function in several biological processes. (2020-06-04)

Breaking up is hard to do (especially for sex chromosomes)
A team of scientists at the Sloan Kettering Institute has discovered how the X and Y chromosomes find one another, break, and recombine during meiosis even though they have little in common. (2020-05-28)

The genome of jojoba: The only plant to store wax in its seeds
Interest on Jojoba crop was, and still is, jojoba oil, which is not a glyceride fat, but a liquid wax with unique chemical configuration and features. 'Therefore, it raises the need to generate an overview on the oil deposit in relation to structural arrangement of seed,' says Dr. Ljudmilla Borisjuk, head of the research group Assimilate Allocation and NMR (AAN) at IPK. (2020-05-20)

How do plants forget?
The study now published in Nature Cell Biology reveals more information on the capacity of plants, identified as 'epigenetic memory,' which allows recording important information to, for example, remember prolonged cold in the winter to ensure they flower at the right time during the spring. (2020-05-15)

How plants forget
New work published in Nature Cell Biology from an international team led by Dr. Michael Borg, a postdoc in the lab of Dr. Frédéric Berger at the Gregor Mendel Institute in Vienna, Austria, has uncovered the answer to a decades-old question - how do plants forget? By incorporating an atypical histone variant in sperm, plants are able to reset an important epigenetic mark, thereby erasing paternal ''memory'' in the next generation. (2020-05-13)

Accurate 3D imaging of sperm cells moving at top speed could improve IVF treatments
Tel Aviv University (TAU) researchers have developed a safe and accurate 3D imaging method to identify sperm cells moving at a high speed. The new method has the potential to significantly improve IVF treatments. (2020-05-07)

How small chromosomes compete with big ones for a cell's attention
Scientists at the Sloan Kettering Institute have solved the puzzle of how small chromosomes ensure that they aren't skipped over during meiosis, the process that makes sperm and egg. (2020-05-06)

Offspring may inherit legacy of their father's Toxoplasma infection
Australian researchers have revealed for the first time that males infected with the Toxoplasma parasite can impact their offspring's brain health and behaviour. Studying mice infected with the common parasite Toxoplasma, the team discovered that sperm of infected fathers carried an altered 'epigenetic' signature which impacted the brains of resulting offspring. Molecules in the sperm called 'small RNA' appeared to influence the offspring's brain development and behaviour. (2020-04-28)

Honey bees could help monitor fertility loss in insects due to climate change
New research from the University of British Columbia and North Carolina State University could help scientists track how climate change is impacting the birds and the bees... of honey bees. (2020-04-27)

Evidence suggests COVID-19 isn't sexually transmitted
COVID-19 is unlikely to be spread through semen, according to University of Utah Health scientists who participated in an international study of Chinese men who recently had the disease. The researchers found no evidence of the virus that causes COVID-19 in the semen or testes of the men. The study could not fully rule out the possibility that the disease could be sexually transmitted. However, the chances of it occurring appear to be remote. (2020-04-22)

Age matters: Paternal age and the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders in children
It is no secret that genetic factors play a role in determining whether children have neurodevelopmental disorders. Maternal exposure to drugs and viral or bacterial illnesses can be detrimental too. (2020-04-20)

Novel sperm membrane protein FIMP facilitates mammalian fertilization
Researchers from Osaka University have identified a new sperm membrane protein that facilitates the complex sperm-oocyte fusion that is fundamental to sexual reproduction, naming it Fertilization Influencing Membrane Protein (FIMP). Using genome editing technology to generate knockout mice deficient in specific genes, they confirmed its importance in addition to the three factors already known. This knowledge may help in the management of human infertility and advance the development of non-hormonal male contraceptives. (2020-04-16)

Preservation of testicular cells to save endangered feline species
A research team at the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) developed a method to isolate and cryopreserve testicular cells. This will allow the safekeeping and biobanking of gametes and other cells of the male reproductive tract of threatened or endangered feline species. The findings have been published in the scientific journal 'Cryobiology.' (2020-03-31)

A critical enzyme for sperm formation could be a target for treating male infertility
Researchers led by Jeremy Wang of the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine have identified an enzyme essential for the process of male meiosis, the type of cell division that produces sperm. The protein, SKP1, controls one of the key transitions in meiosis. Understanding its role may help scientists develop new approaches to treating male infertility. (2020-03-25)

Anxious about COVID-19? Stress can have lasting impacts on sperm and future offspring
Prolonged fear and anxiety brought on by major stressors, like the coronavirus pandemic, can not only take a toll on a person's mental health, but may also have a lasting impact on a man's sperm composition that could affect his future offspring. That is the finding of a provocative new study published in the journal Nature Communications by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. (2020-03-23)

Parental diet affects sperm and health of future offspring
When parents eat low-protein or high-fat diets it can lead to metabolic disorders in their adult offspring. Now, an international team led by researchers at RIKEN in Japan have identified a key player and the molecular events underlying this phenomenon in mice. (2020-03-19)

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