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Current Sperm News and Events, Sperm News Articles.
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New details revealed on how plants maintain optimal sperm-egg ratio
Molecular biologist Alice Cheung and colleagues at UMass Amherst used powerful new molecular biochemistry, microscopy and genetic techniques to solve, in unprecedented detail, the mechanisms of how flowering plants avoid polyspermy. (2020-03-18)

Love rivals risk having offspring with a greater number of harmful mutations
Males that face tougher competition for females risk having offspring with a greater number of harmful mutations in their genome than males without rivals. Researchers at Uppsala University have discovered this correlation in the beetle species Callosobruchus maculatus. Their study is published in the scientific journal Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2020-03-16)

How sperm unpack dad's genome so it can merge with mom's
UC San Diego researchers discover the enzyme SPRK1's role in reorganizing the paternal genome during the first moments of fertilization -- a finding that might help explain infertility cases of unknown cause. (2020-03-13)

Common feed ingredient tested safe in bulls
Cattle feeders choose distillers grains in feedlot diets as an inexpensive alternative to corn and soybean meal. But until now, no one had studied the effects of the common feed ingredient on bull development and fertility. With bull fertility to blame for a significant portion of reproductive failures in cow-calf operations, University of Illinois researchers decided it was worth a look. (2020-03-10)

Swamp wallabies conceive new embryo before birth -- a unique reproductive strategy
Reproduction specialists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW), Germany, and the University of Melbourne, Australia, recently demonstrated that swamp wallabies ovulate, mate and form a new embryo before the birth of the previous offspring. They thereby continuously support embryos and young at different development stages before and after birth. (2020-03-02)

Antioxidant supplements do not improve male fertility, NIH study suggests
Antioxidant supplements do not improve semen quality among men with infertility, according to a new study supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development . (2020-02-28)

Monogamous female sea turtles? Yes, thanks to sperm storage
Female sea turtles mate multiply to ensure fertilization. A study of nesting loggerhead female sea turtles in southwest Florida used genotyping to uncover how many fathers were represented in their nests. Surprisingly, scientists found that 75 percent of the female sea turtles had mated singly. No male was represented in more than one female's clutches. Findings provide insights into the relative numbers of males present in the breeding population, which are hard to get because males never come ashore. (2020-02-27)

NUI Galway highlights reproductive flexibility in hydractinia, a Galway bay jellyfish
A new study, led by Dr Tim DuBuc and Professor Uri Frank from the Centre for Chromosome Biology at NUI Galway, has found that Hydractinia, a North Atlantic jellyfish that also lives in Galway Bay, reproduces in a similar way to humans but does so far more flexibly. (2020-02-21)

Stressed corals set up progeny for a better life
First evidence that animal DNA methylation patterns can be passed to the next generation. (2020-02-19)

A new way to assess male fertility
Current tests for male fertility include measuring the concentration and motility of spermatozoa. However, other characteristics of sperm, such as their ability to follow a chemical trail to the egg, can influence the likelihood of fertilization. Now, researchers reporting in Analytical Chemistry have devised a quick and convenient microfluidic chip to assess this chemotactic response of spermatozoa, which could help provide a more complete picture of a man's fertility. (2020-02-19)

Earthquakes disrupt sperm whales' ability to find food, study finds
Otago scientists studying sperm whales off the coast of Kaik?ura have discovered earthquakes affect their ability to find food for at least a year. The University of Otago-led research is the first to examine the impact of a large earthquake on a population of marine mammals, and offers new insight into how top predators such as sperm whales react and adapt to a large-scale natural disturbance. (2020-02-19)

IVF-conceived children have somewhat higher mortality risk in their first weeks of life
Children conceived with assisted reproductive techniques including IVF have a somewhat higher mortality risk during their first weeks of life than children conceived naturally, according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal Fertility and Sterility. The researchers link the increased risk to a higher degree of premature births in IVF children and emphasize that the risk of infant mortality is still very small for both groups. (2020-02-18)

Scientists finally figure out how millipedes actually do it
Scientists have a pretty good handle on how the birds and the bees work, but it comes to mating, almost all millipedes have been a mystery -- until now. For the first time, researchers have puzzled out how these tiny creatures' complex genitalia work, thanks to new imaging techniques and blacklights that make the different tissues glow. (2020-02-13)

How a tiny and strange marine animal produces unlimited eggs and sperm over its lifetime
During human embryonic development, a small pool of germ cells that will eventually become gametes is set aside, and all sperm or eggs that humans produce during their lives are the descendants of those original few germ cells. But a strange and tiny animal called Hydractinia forms germ cells continuously in adult life -- hence producing unlimited eggs and sperm. (2020-02-13)

Discovery of genes involved in infertility
A research group from Kumamoto University, Japan has discovered a gene, 'Meiosin', that acts as the switch to turn on meiosis. The gene appears to be related to the cause of infertility and could be a big step forward for reproductive medicine. (2020-02-06)

UCLA research could be step toward lab-grown eggs and sperm to treat infertility
A new study on how and when the precursors to eggs and sperm are formed during development could help pave the way for generating egg and sperm cells in the lab to treat infertility. (2020-02-06)

Efficient cryopreservation of genetically modified rat spermatozoa
Researchers at Kumamoto University have developed a new technique to improve the efficiency of rat sperm cryopreservation, a process that is usually extremely difficult. Their technique makes it possible to produce more than 300 offspring from one male rat through in vitro fertilization using frozen sperm. It can be used to maintain specific strains of genetically modified rats that are in high demand for medical research. (2020-01-31)

Study provides first look at sperm microbiome using RNA sequencing
A new collaborative study published by a research team from the Wayne State University School of Medicine, the CReATe Fertility Centre and the University of Massachusetts Amherst provides the first in-depth look at the microbiome of human sperm utilizing RNA sequencing with sufficient sensitivity to identify contamination and pathogenic bacterial colonization. (2020-01-30)

Stopping sperm in its tracks: latest progress in the hunt for a male contraceptive
Researchers at the University of Dundee have developed an unrivalled, fully automated robotic screening system which allows them to rapidly test the effect of drugs and other chemicals on human sperm. The research team at Dundee, led by Professor Chris Barratt and Dr Paul Andrews, are working towards finding a safe and effective male contraceptive. (2020-01-28)

NUS Medicine researchers can reprogramme cells to original state for regenerative medicine
Scientists from NUS Medicine have found a way to induce totipotency in embryonic cells that have already matured into pluripotency. This has great potential to improve cell engineering capabilities for regenerative medicine therapeutics. (2020-01-28)

Bending with the wind, coral spawning linked to ocean environment
A research team from Tohoku University, Ochanomizu University, and the National Institute for Basic Biology have utilized modeling analysis to indicate that environmental factors act as a determinant in the timing of mass spawning. (2020-01-23)

Scanning system in sperm may control rate of human evolution
Maturing sperm cells turn on most of their genes, not to follow their genetic instructions like normal, but instead to repair DNA before passing it to the next generation, a new study finds. (2020-01-23)

Male fertility after chemotherapy: New questions raised
Professor Delbès, who specializes in reproductive toxicology, conducted a pilot study in collaboration with oncologists and fertility specialists from the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) on a cohort of 13 patients, all survivors of pediatric leukemia and lymphoma. Their results, recently published in the journal Plos One, raise important questions about male fertility and the long-term quality of life of cancer survivors. (2020-01-22)

Sperm donation to strangers after death should be allowed in the UK, say ethicists
Men in the UK should be allowed to voluntarily donate their sperm after death, if they want to, argue ethicists in an analysis published online in the Journal of Medical Ethics. (2020-01-20)

It takes more than two to tango: Microbial communities influence animal sex and reproduction
It is an awkward idea, but a couple's ability to have kids may partly depend on who else is present. The reproductive tracts of males and females contain whole communities of micro-organisms. These microbes can have considerable impact on (animal) fertility and reproduction, as shown by Melissah Rowe, from the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), and co-authors this week with an extensive overview in Trends in Ecology & Evolution. It may even lead to new species. (2020-01-17)

Dresden biologists make living sperm glow
By applying a novel method, biologists at TU Dresden have successfully analysed the metabolism of intact tissues of the fruit fly using a label-free microscopy technique. They used the natural fluorescence of certain metabolic molecules and found that sperm, compared to other tissues, are highly glycolytic. (2020-01-15)

Male songbirds can't survive on good looks alone, says a new study
Brightly colored male songbirds not only have to attract the female's eye, but also make sure their sperm can last the distance, according to new research. (2020-01-15)

What we're learning about the reproductive microbiome
Most research has focused on the oral, skin, and gut microbiomes, but bacteria, viruses, and fungi living within our reproductive systems may also affect sperm quality, fertilization, embryo implantation, and other aspects of conception and reproduction. Yet, according to a review published Jan. 14 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, little is known about the reproductive microbiome. (2020-01-14)

A 'pivotal' moment for understanding whale evolution
We could be getting closer to understanding how feeding behaviors in whales and dolphins have evolved over time. (2020-01-09)

First genomic study of puberty yields insights into development and cancer
In the first-ever genome-scale analysis of the puberty process in humans, researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) outline distinct and critical changes to stem cells in males during adolescence. (2020-01-09)

Common plasticizer disrupts C. elegans egg production
A new study published Jan. 9 in PLOS Genetics by Mónica Colaiácovo of Harvard Medical School and colleagues reports that the most commonly used plasticizer, diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), leads to fertility problems by causing an excess number of breaks in the DNA during egg production, and then interfering with the repair systems that fixes the breaks. (2020-01-09)

Zinc, folic acid supplements fail to enhance male fertility
Zinc and folic acid, a pair of dietary supplements long touted as an effective treatment for male infertility, failed to improve pregnancy rates, sperm counts, and sperm potency in a new study conducted at University of Utah Health and other medical centers in conjunction with the National Institutes of Health. According to the researchers, the finding presents the most definitive evidence to date that so-called fertility supplements do not live up expectations. (2020-01-07)

Diet has rapid effects on sperm quality
Sperm are influenced by diet, and the effects arise rapidly. This is the conclusion of a study by researchers at Linköping University, in which healthy young men were fed a diet rich in sugar. The study, which has been published in PLOS Biology, gives new insight into the function of sperm, and may in the long term contribute to new diagnostic methods to measure sperm quality. (2019-12-27)

Measuring mutations in sperm may reveal risk for autism in future children
Spontaneous mutations in male sperm are linked to development of autism spectrum disorder. Researchers have created a way to measure mutations and estimate risk of ASD in future children. If developed into a clinical test, the method could be a useful predictive tool in genetic counseling. (2019-12-23)

Fewer fats over the festive season may be the perfect formula for men's fertility
A diet low in fat and high in egg whites could be the key to boosting male fertility according to a new pilot study. (2019-12-22)

New gene for male infertility discovered
Investigators have found that a genetic rearrangement and variants affecting a gene known as SYCP2 are associated with low sperm count and report the first cases implicating the gene in four men with infertility. (2019-12-19)

Researchers uncover genetic mystery of infertility in fruit flies
Researchers have discovered a novel parasitic gene in fruit flies that is responsible for destroying the eggs in the ovaries of their daughters. (2019-12-17)

Penn researchers uncover defective sperm epigenome that leads to male infertility
One out of eight couples has trouble conceiving, with a quarter of those cases caused by unexplained male infertility. Research has linked that to defective sperm that fail to 'evict' proteins called histones from DNA during development. However, the mechanisms behind that eviction and where this is happening has remained unclear. Now, researchers show, using newer genome-wide DNA sequencing tools, the precise genetic locations of those retained histones, and a key gene regulating it. (2019-12-16)

Collaboration yields insights into mosquito reproduction
As carriers for diseases like dengue and Zika, mosquitoes kill more than 1 million people each year and sicken hundreds of millions more. But a better understanding of mosquito reproduction can help humans combat outbreaks of these diseases, which are worsening as the climate warms. (2019-12-16)

The limits of ocean heavyweights: Prey curb whales' gigantic size
Scientists collected data from hundreds of feeding whales, allowing them to determine how much energy species of different sizes invest to capture their prey and which of these species reap the greatest rewards for their efforts. Their findings reveal that body size in all whales is limited by the availability of their prey, but only filter-feeding whales have evolved a feeding strategy that drives them to achieve the largest body sizes to have ever evolved. (2019-12-12)

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