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Current Sperm News and Events, Sperm News Articles.
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Protein defect leaves sperm chasing their tails
A team led by researchers from Osaka University have characterized a protein, called VSP, that keeps sperm swimming in straight lines. Deletion of the protein caused sperm to swim in circles, significantly reducing fertilization rates. VSP also controlled the influx of calcium ions into the flagellum, which is necessary for propulsion of the sperm towards the egg. The researchers hope that their discovery will aid in the development of fertility treatments to enhance sperm motility. (2019-12-02)

TU Dresden biologists examine sperm quality on the basis of their metabolism
Every tenth couple worldwide is affected by infertility. The reasons for this are manifold, but mostly well researched. Nevertheless, about fifteen percent of cases remain unexplained. A team of biologists at TU Dresden has now gained new insights into the metabolic properties that make up a good sperm cell. (2019-11-28)

Fertilization discovery could lead to new male contraceptive, help infertile couples
An unexpected discovery about fertilization reveals new insights into how sperm and egg fuse and could have major implications for couples battling infertility -- and may lead to a future male contraceptive. (2019-11-18)

A potential new way to diagnose male infertility and pharmaceutical treatment options
Washington State University-led research has discovered infertile men have identifiable patterns of epigenetic molecules or biomarkers attached to their sperm DNA that aren't present in fertile men. The scientists also identified biomarkers among infertile patients who responded to hormone therapy to treat their condition versus those who did not. (2019-11-14)

The reproductive function of the clitoris
A recent review published in Clinical Anatomy highlights evidence that the female clitoris is important for reproduction. (2019-11-06)

Cytoplasm of scrambled frog eggs organizes into cell-like structures, Stanford study finds
The cytoplasm of ruptured Xenopus frog eggs spontaneously reorganizes into cell-like compartments, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2019-11-06)

No defects found in reproductive ability of male mice returning from short stay in space
Male mice raised in space using specially developed cages were returned safely to Earth. The sperm production/fertilizing ability of the mice were normal and the reproduction ability of the offspring were not affected by their parents' stay in outer space. The findings on the effects of the environment in space on the male reproductive system will contribute to the accumulation of basic knowledge for humankind to expand the range of its activity to space. (2019-10-23)

How the mouse X and Y chromosomes compete with each other to control offspring
New research presents the first demonstration of a specific difference in sperm function associated with sex ratio skewing. (2019-10-21)

Genes linked to sex ratio and male fertility in mice
Michigan Medicine researchers find genes that help maintain the 50-50 balance between male and female offspring in mice--and that have major implications for male infertility. (2019-10-18)

Did early mammals turn to night life to protect their sperm?
Humans are diurnal -- we are active in the day and sleep at night. But diurnalism is by far the exception rather the rule in mammals. About 250-230 million years ago, the mammalian ancestors, called the therapsids, became exclusively nocturnal, and stayed so until the demise of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. (2019-10-15)

A father's diet could affect the long-term heart health of his offspring
A new study has found that a lack of protein in a father's diet affects the quality of his sperm and in turn, could affect the long-term cardiovascular health of his offspring. (2019-10-15)

Sperm and egg cell 'immune response' protects koala DNA
Discovery of a type of immunity that protects koalas' DNA from viruses has importance for the survival of koalas and our fundamental understanding of evolution. A team of scientists from The University of Queensland and University of Massachusetts Medical School are studying tissue samples from koalas to understand how a unique type of cell responds to retrovirus infections, which cause diseases such as chlamydia and cancer. (2019-10-14)

Chlamydia in testicular tissue linked to male infertility
The potential impact of undiagnosed sexually transmitted chlamydia infection on men's fertility has been highlighted in a study led by scientists at Queensland University of Technology (QUT), which for the first time found chlamydia in the testicular tissue biopsies of infertile men whose infertility had no identified cause. (2019-10-09)

Dietary supplement from tomatoes discovered to boost sperm quality
Sperm quality can be improved with a simple diet supplement containing a compound found in cooked tomatoes, according to new research by the University of Sheffield. (2019-10-09)

Father's obesity in puberty doubles the risk of asthma in his future offspring
A Norwegian study shows that boys who are obese in pre-puberty have an over two times higher risk of having children with asthma than those who are not. (2019-10-02)

Species could buffer reproduction against climate change through sperm and egg plasticity
New research shows that beetles have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to reproduce despite warmer temperatures. They have evolved mechanisms that allow their sperm and eggs to quickly cope with increasing environmental temperature variation. And this could help species buffer themselves against climate change. (2019-10-02)

Link between assisted reproduction and risk for prostate cancer
In a new national register study from Lund University in Sweden, researchers have studied the link between prostate cancer and infertility. The study, published in the British Medical Journal, includes over one million Swedish men. 'Men who seek health care for infertility and assisted reproduction were shown to be at higher risk for prostate cancer than those who had become fathers by natural means,' says Yvonne Lundberg Giwercman, professor of experimental pathology with a specialisation in cancer at Lund University. (2019-09-26)

Cell biology: Endocannabinoid system may be involved in human testis physiology
The endocannabinoid system (ECS) may be directly involved in the regulation of the physiology of the human testis, including the development of sperm cells, according to a study in tissue samples from 15 patients published in Scientific Reports. (2019-09-19)

Large meta-analysis links IVF to higher gestational diabetes risk
Women who give birth to singleton babies following assisted reproductive technologies including vitro fertilisation (IVF) are at greater risk of developing gestational diabetes than those who conceive naturally, according to a meta-analysis involving over almost 2 million singleton pregnancies. (2019-09-18)

Buzzkill?
They say love is blind, but if you're a queen honeybee it could mean true loss of sight. New research from UC Riverside finds male honeybees inject toxins during sex that cause temporary blindness. (2019-09-10)

Breakdown in coral spawning places species at risk of extinction
Synchronized coral spawning has become erratic, endangering the long-term survival of coral species, Tel Aviv University researchers say. (2019-09-05)

Breakdown of spawning synchrony silently threatens coral survival in red sea reefs
Changes to the environmental conditions that underpin the reproductive success of some corals may be causing their highly synchronized mass-spawning strategy to break down, a new study finds. (2019-09-05)

The argument for sexual selection in bacteria
The evolutionary pressure to pass on DNA can produce behavior that otherwise makes no sense in a struggle to survive. Rams bash heads in fights over females; peacocks grow elaborate tail feathers that attract mates and predators alike. Sexual selection can sometimes explain phenomena that natural selection alone cannot. But could bacteria exhibit sexual selection? In an Opinion article published Sept. 4 in the journal Trends in Microbiology, researchers argue that some bacteria might. (2019-09-04)

Gene linked to autism undergoes changes in men's sperm after pot use
A specific gene associated with autism appears to undergo changes in the sperm of men who use marijuana, according to new research from Duke Health. The gene change occurs through a process called DNA methylation, and it could potentially be passed along to offspring. (2019-08-27)

Northern white rhino eggs successfully fertilized
After successfully harvesting 10 eggs from the world's last two northern white rhinos, Najin and Fatu, on August 22nd in Kenya, the international consortium of scientists and conservationists announces that 7 out of the 10 eggs (4 from Fatu and 3 from Najin) were successfully matured and artificially inseminated. This was achieved through ICSI (Intra Cytoplasm Sperm Injection) with frozen sperm from two different northern white rhino bulls, Suni and Saut, on Sunday, August 25th. (2019-08-26)

Successful egg harvest breaks new ground in saving the northern white rhinoceros
There are only two northern white rhinos left worldwide, both of them female. Saving this representative of megafauna from extinction seems impossible under these circumstances, yet an international consortium of scientists and conservationists just completed a procedure that could enable assisted reproduction techniques to do just that. On August 22, 2019, a team of veterinarians successfully harvested eggs from the two females who live in Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya. (2019-08-23)

From the tiny testes of flies, new insight into how genes arise
A common birthplace of new genes, the male testes are a hotspot for biological innovation. Within these organs, scientists have found a trove of virgin genetic sequences--and a better understanding of how evolution moves forward. (2019-08-16)

A simpler way to choose the sex of offspring by separating X and Y sperm
A simple, reversible chemical treatment can segregate X-bearing sperm from Y-bearing sperm, allowing dramatic alteration of the normal 50/50 male/female offspring ratio, according to a new study by Masayuki Shimada and colleagues at Hiroshima University, published on Aug. 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology. The study was performed in mice, but the technique is likely to be widely applicable to other mammals as well. (2019-08-13)

Transgender women case study shows sperm production is possible but not certain
One young transgender woman was able to produce viable sperm after a few months of discontinuing her puberty-halting medication, whereas a second case wasn't able to produce sperm during the time she could tolerate being off her medication. (2019-08-05)

New computational method could advance precision medicine
Scientists have devised a new computational method that reveals genetic patterns in the massive jumble of individual cells in the body. The discovery, published in the journal eLife, will be useful in discerning patterns of gene expression across many kinds of disease, including cancer. Scientists worked out the formulation by testing tissue taken from the testes of mice. Results in hand, they're already applying the same analysis to biopsies taken from men with unexplained infertility. (2019-08-01)

Genome research shows that the body controls the integrity of heritable genomes
Writing in Developmental Cell, scientists at the University of Cologne presented new findings that challenge established concepts of genetic inheritance. They have proven that somatic cells of the roundworm C. elegans influence heredity. (2019-07-24)

Cane toad testes smaller at the invasion front
Biological invasions impose novel evolutionary pressures. Individuals at an invasion front may allocate most of their resources to dispersing rather than reproducing. In the invasive cane toad in Australia, Professor Rick Shine and Dr. Chris Friesen report, invasion-front males have smaller testes (testicles) than do males in the range-core. (2019-07-23)

Sperm may offer the uterus a 'secret handshake'
Why does it take 200 million sperm to fertilize a single egg? Part of the reason is bombardment by the female immune system, which very few sperm survive. Researchers have discovered a molecular handshake between sperm and uterine cells that may help sperm evade this attack --or may help the immune system target the weakest sperm. (2019-07-18)

Ancient epigenetic changes silence cancer-linked genes
A study in zebrafish indicates that some genes linked to cancers in humans have been strictly regulated throughout evolution. (2019-07-11)

Sneaky mating may be in female damselfies' interest
New research on damselflies in northern Africa suggests that females may facilitate the reproductive success of inferior males when their health is at risk. (2019-07-08)

New study challenges claim that exogenous RNA is essential for sperm function
Scientists from the University of Bath are challenging the claims of two high profile papers from 2018 which reported that in the mouse, RNA has to be added to sperm for them to be fully fertile. The Bath findings undermine a proposed mechanism of epigenetic inheritance in which offspring inherit traits acquired by their parents. (2019-07-02)

ICSI has no outcome benefits over conventional IVF in routine non-male infertility cases
Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), the world's favored means of fertilization in assisted reproduction, offers no benefit over conventional in vitro fertilization in fertility treatments without a male factor indication, according to results of a large multicenter study. (2019-06-26)

Paternal age over 51 years reduces success rate in IVF and ICSI
While female fertility comes to an irrevocable end with the menopause (at a consistently average age of 51 years), men are not constrained by similar biological senescence. Studies have shown that sperm counts may decline and DNA damage in sperm cells may increase over time, but the celebrity fatherhood of ageing actors and rock stars perpetuates the myth that male fertility might last forever. (2019-06-26)

European pregnancy rates from IVF and ICSI 'appear to have reached a peak'
The latest annual data collected by ESHRE from European national registries (for 2016) show another rise in the cumulative use of IVF in the treatment of infertility, although success rates after IVF or ICSI appear to have reached a peak, with pregnancy rates per started treatment calculated at 27.1% after IVF and 24.3% after ICSI. (2019-06-25)

Preconceptional and prenatal exposure to paternal smoking affects semen quality of adult sons
The adverse effect of maternal smoking during pregnancy is well established and associated with several negative neonatal outcomes (such as low birth weight and preterm birth). It is also evident in some studies that the semen quality of men exposed to prenatal maternal smoking is generally more impaired than that of unexposed men. However, there is little known about the effect of paternal smoking in the time leading up to and during pregnancy. (2019-06-25)

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