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Current Spiders News and Events, Spiders News Articles.
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Double-sided tape for tissues could replace surgical sutures
Inspired by a sticky substance spiders use to catch prey, MIT engineers designed a double-sided tape that can rapidly seal tissues together. This adhesive may eventually be used in place of surgical sutures or to implant medical devices. (2019-10-30)

Hormonal contraceptives affect the efficacy of exposure therapy
Psychologists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have studied in what way hormonal contraceptives affect the efficacy of anxiety therapy. They demonstrated that women who were on the pill benefitted less from exposure therapy than women who didn't take any oral contraceptives. Friederike Raeder, Professor Armin Zlomuzica and colleagues describe the results in the Journal of Psychiatric Research, published online on Sept. 28, 2019. (2019-10-29)

Compact depth sensor inspired by spiders
Inspired by jumping spiders, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a compact and efficient depth sensor that could be used on board microrobots, in small wearable devices, or in lightweight virtual and augmented reality headsets. The device combines a multifunctional, flat metalens with an ultra-efficient algorithm to measure depth in a single shot. (2019-10-28)

Forests on the radar
With freely available radar data from satellites, biodiversity in forests can be analysed very well. In Nature Communications, researchers report that biodiversity even of tiny insects can be reliably modelled from space. (2019-10-21)

Spider silk: A malleable protein provides reinforcement
Scientists from the University of Würzburg have discovered that spider silk contains an exceptional protein. It generates high bonding strength by making use of an amino acid scientists have hitherto paid little attention to. The finding could have important implications in many areas. (2019-09-26)

Half-a-billion-year-old tiny predator unveils the rise of scorpions and spiders
Two palaeontologists working on the world-renowned Burgess Shale have revealed a new species, called Mollisonia plenovenatrix, which is presented as the oldest chelicerate. This discovery places the origin of this vast group of animals -- of over 115,000 species, including horseshoe crabs, scorpions and spiders -- to a time more than 500 million years ago. The findings are published in the prestigious journal Nature on Sept. 11, 2019. (2019-09-11)

The Paleozoic diet: Why animals eat what they eat
In what likely is the first study on the evolution of dietary preferences across the animal kingdom, UA researchers report several unexpected discoveries, including that the first animal likely was a carnivore and that humans, along with other omnivores, belong to a rare breed. (2019-08-22)

Researchers find hurricanes drive the evolution of more aggressive spiders
Researchers at McMaster University who rush in after storms to study the behavior of spiders have found that extreme weather events such as tropical cyclones may have an evolutionary impact on populations living in storm-prone regions, where aggressive spiders have the best odds of survival. (2019-08-19)

Male black widows piggyback on work of rivals in a desperate attempt to find a mate
A new U of T study finds male black widow spiders will hijack silk trails left by rival males in their search for a potential mate. (2019-08-02)

Baby spiders really are watching you
Baby jumping spiders can hunt prey just like their parents do because they have vision nearly as good. A study published in the journal Vision Research helps explain how animals the size of a bread crumb fit all the complex architecture of adult eyes into a much tinier package. (2019-07-31)

Japanese scientists embrace creepy-crawlies
Firms in Japan are changing people's perceptions about common spiders, worms and insect larvae. These seemingly unwanted creatures have unique features that could be useful for many applications that benefit humans, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (2019-07-17)

Trendy on eight legs: Jumping spider named after fashion czar Karl Lagerfeld
New to science species of Australian jumping spider was named after Hamburg-born fashion icon Karl Lagerfeld (1933-2019) after the arachnid reminded its discoverers of the designer. Intrigued by the distinct 'downplayed' black-and-white colors of the arachnid, the Hamburg-Brisbane-Melbourne team likened its appearance to the trademark style of the German designer. Thus, the curious species is described in the open-access journal Evolutionary Systematics under the name Jotus karllagerfeldiI. (2019-07-02)

Solitude breeds aggression in spiders (rather than vice versa)
Spiders start out social but later turn aggressive after dispersing and becoming solitary, according to a study publishing July 2 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Raphael Jeanson of the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) in France, and colleagues. (2019-07-02)

Spiders risk everything for love
A biology study finds that blue jays can easily spot wolf spiders engaged in their courtship rituals. The results demonstrate the powerful influence of sexual selection. (2019-06-20)

U of G researchers discover meat-eating plant in Ontario, Canada
Pitcher plants growing in wetlands across Canada have long been known to eat creatures -- mostly insects and spiders -- that fall into their bell-shaped leaves and decompose in rainwater collected there. But University of Guelph researchers have discovered the vertebrates, salmanders, are also part of their diet. He said pitcher plants may have become carnivorous to gain nutrients, especially nitrogen, that are lacking in nutrient-poor bog soil. (2019-06-07)

First-ever spider glue genes sequenced, paving way to next biomaterials breakthrough
UMBC's Sarah Stellwagen and Rebecca Renberg at the Army Reserach Lab have determined the first-ever complete sequences of two spider glue genes. Spider glue is a modified form of spider silk that keeps a spider's prey stuck in its web, and it could have applications in organic pest control and beyond. The sequences took two years to determine and required 'third-generation' sequencing techniques because of the length and repetitive nature of the genes. (2019-06-05)

New research shows that mites and ticks are close relatives
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Natural History Museum in London have reconstructed the evolutionary history of the chelicerates, the mega-diverse group of 110,000 arthropods that includes spiders, scorpions, mites and ticks. (2019-05-24)

'Spidey senses' could help autonomous machines see better
Purdue University researchers are building 'spidey senses' into the shells of autonomous cars and drones so that they could detect and avoid objects better. (2019-05-20)

Coastal organisms trapped in 99-million-year-old amber
Most amber inclusions are organisms that lived in the forest. It is very rare to find sea life trapped in amber. However, an international research group led by Professor WANG Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS) reported the first known ammonite trapped in amber. (2019-05-13)

Spider venom is a dangerous cocktail
Spider venom does not only consist of neurotoxins but also of a multitude of dangerous constituents. Researchers of the University of Bern present a summary of many years of spider venom research in a new study and show how various substances present in spider venom interact with each other and thus effectively render the spider's prey defenseless. (2019-05-02)

Parasitoid wasps may turn spiders into zombies by hacking their internal code
A hijacked hormone may zombify spiders, altering their web-spinning behavior to favor wasp parasites. (2019-04-29)

How cortisol affects exposure therapy for anxiety disorders
Bochum-based psychologists have studied how the application of the stress hormone cortisol affects exposure therapy for anxiety disorders. The researchers knew from earlier studies that extinction learning, which constitutes the foundation of exposure therapy, can be reinforced by administering cortisol. However, the team has demonstrated with a group of arachnophobics that an application of cortisol after exposure is not beneficial for the patients. (2019-04-25)

Global warming hits sea creatures hardest
Global warming has caused twice as many ocean-dwelling species as land-dwelling species to disappear from their habitats, a unique Rutgers-led study found. The greater vulnerability of sea creatures may significantly impact human communities that rely on fish and shellfish for food and economic activity, according to the study published in the journal Nature. (2019-04-24)

Seven seconds of Spiderman viewing yields a 20% phobia symptom reduction
As the Marvel Avenger Endgame premieres in movie theaters this week, researchers have published a new article in Frontiers in Psychology which reveals that exposure to Spiderman and Antman movie excerpts decreases symptoms of spider and ant phobias, respectively. (2019-04-23)

Glowing millipede genitalia help scientists tell species apart
Researchers studying near-identical species of millipedes found a new way to tell them apart: shining a blacklight on them. Under the UV light, parts of the different species' genitals will glow different colors. This discovery has allowed scientists to rewrite this part of the millipede family tree. (2019-04-18)

Hold the mustard: What makes spiders fussy eaters
It might be one of nature's most agile and calculating hunters, but the wolf spider won't harm an insect that literally leaves a bad taste in its mouth, according to new research by a team of Wake Forest University sensory neuroscientists, including C.J. Saunders. (2019-04-15)

Giant Antarctic sea spiders weather warming by getting holey
Scientists have wondered for decades why marine animals that live in the polar oceans and the deep sea can reach giant sizes there, but nowhere else. University of Hawai'i at Manoa zoology Ph.D. student Caitlin Shishido, with UH researcher Amy Moran and colleagues at the University of Montana, went to Antarctica to test the prevailing theory -- the 'oxygen-temperature hypothesis' -- that animals living in extreme cold can grow to giant sizes because their metabolisms are very slow. (2019-04-10)

New pathways for sustainable agriculture
Diversity beats monotony: a colourful patchwork of small, differently used plots can bring advantages to agriculture and nature. This is the result of a new study by the University of Würzburg. (2019-04-08)

Bacterial factories could manufacture high-performance proteins for space missions
Nature has evolved protein-based substances with mechanical properties that rival even the best synthetic materials. Pound for pound, spider silk is stronger and tougher than steel. But unlike steel, the natural fiber cannot be mass-produced. Today, scientists report a method in which bacteria produce spider silk and other proteins that could be useful during space missions. The researchers will present their results today at the American Chemical Society Spring 2019 National Meeting & Exposition. (2019-04-02)

How the brain fights off fears that return to haunt us
Neuroscientists have discovered a group of neurons that are responsible when a frightening memory re-emerges unexpectedly, like Michael Myers in every 'Halloween' movie. The finding could lead to new recommendations about when and how often certain therapies are deployed for the treatment of anxiety, phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). (2019-04-01)

Effective fear of heights treatment without a therapist using virtual reality
A fully self-guided treatment using virtual reality (VR) is effective in reducing fear of heights. A team of researchers from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (VU) and the University of Twente, led by Dr. Tara Donker, developed ZeroPhobia (www.zerophobia.app), a treatment delivered through a smartphone app and a basic VR viewer. The results of the study were published today in JAMA Psychiatry. (2019-03-25)

The most aggressive spider societies are not always the ones that flourish
Evolutionary biologists at McMaster University who study the social lives and behaviour of colony spiders -- some of which are docile, others aggressive -- have found that the success of their cooperative societies depend on their neighbours. (2019-03-25)

Climate change affecting fish in Ontario lakes, University of Guelph study reveals
Researchers have found warmer average water temperatures in Ontario lakes over the past decade have forced fish to forage in deeper water. (2019-03-22)

Nature hits rewind
The study of evolution is revealing new complexities, showing how the traits most beneficial to the fitness of individual plants and animals are not always the ones we see in nature. Instead, new research by McMaster behavioural scientists shows that in certain cases evolution works in the opposite direction, reversing individual improvements to benefit related members of the same group. (2019-03-19)

As uniform as cloned soldiers, new spiders were named after the Stormtroopers in Star Wars
Despite being widely distributed across north and central South America, the small family of similarly looking bald-legged spiders had never been confirmed in Colombia. However, a new research paper, published in the open-access journal ZooKeys, describes a total of six previously unknown species inhabiting the country, with four of them belonging to a new genus named Stormtropis -- after the clone trooper army in the famous Star Wars franchise. (2019-03-14)

Study confirms horseshoe crabs are really relatives of spiders, scorpions
By analyzing troves of genetic data and considering a vast number of possible ways to examine it, University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists now have a high degree of confidence that horseshoe crabs do indeed belong within the arachnids. (2019-03-08)

U-M biologists capture super-creepy photos of Amazon spiders making meals of frogs, lizards
Warning to arachnophobes and the faint of heart: This is the stuff of nightmares, so you might want to proceed with caution. (2019-02-28)

Jumping spider mimics two kinds of ants as it grows
Spiders that pretend to be ants to fool predators have an unusual problem when it comes to sex. How do they get the attention of potential mates without breaking character to birds that want to eat them? (2019-02-27)

New tarantula species from Angola distinct with a one-of-a-kind 'horn' on its back
A new to science species of tarantula with a peculiar horn-like protuberance sticking out of its back was recently identified in central Angola, a largely underexplored country located at the intersection of several Afrotropical ecoregions. Collected as part of the National Geographic Okavango Wilderness Project, the new arachnid is described in the open-access journal African Invertebrates. (2019-02-12)

Ancient spider fossils, surprisingly preserved in rock, reveal reflective eyes
A new paper in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, coauthored by a KU researcher, describes fossil spiders found in an area of Korean shale called the Lower Cretaceous Jinju Formation. (2019-02-12)

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