Current Spinal Cord News and Events

Current Spinal Cord News and Events, Spinal Cord News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
ALS neuron damage reversed with new compound
Scientists have identified the first compound that eliminates the ongoing degeneration of upper motor neurons that become diseased and are a key contributor to ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), a swift and fatal neurodegenerative disease that paralyzes its victims. In ALS, movement-initiating nerve cells in the brain and muscle-controlling nerve cells in the spinal cord die. After administering the new compound,, the diseased brain neurons stopped degenerating so much that they became similar to healthy control neurons after 60 days of treatment. (2021-02-23)

Yale scientists repair injured spinal cord using patients' own stem cells
Intravenous injection of bone marrow derived stem cells (MSCs) in patients with spinal cord injuries led to significant improvement in motor functions, researchers from Yale University and Japan report Feb. 18 in the Journal of Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery. (2021-02-22)

'Walking' molecule superstructures could help create neurons for regenerative medicine
By discovering a new printable biomaterial that can mimic properties of brain tissue, Northwestern University researchers are now closer to developing a platform capable of conditions using regenerative medicine. (2021-02-22)

Spina bifida can be caused by uninherited genetic mutations
Genetic mutations which occur naturally during the earliest stages of an embryo's development can cause the severe birth defect spina bifida, finds a new experimental study in mice led by UCL scientists. (2021-02-19)

Radioactive bone cement found to be safer in treating spinal tumors
A radioactive bone cement that's injected into bone to provide support and local irradiation is proving to be a safer alternative to conventional radiation therapy for bone tumors, according to a study led by University of California, Irvine researchers. (2021-02-16)

Lifestyle changes in pregnant women affected babies' genes
A study led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden showed a connection between lifestyle intervention in pregnant women with obesity and epigenetic alterations in the baby. The study is published in the journal Diabetes. (2021-02-11)

Hope for children with bow hunter syndrome
DALLAS - Feb. 11, 2021 - Fusing the neck's top two vertebrae can prevent repeat strokes in children with bow hunter syndrome, a rare condition that affects a handful of U.S. pediatric patients each year, UT Southwestern researchers suggest in a recent study. The finding, published online in Child's Nervous System, offers a new way to treat these children and protect them from potentially lifelong neurological consequences. (2021-02-11)

Spinal fluid of people with Alzheimer's risk gene signals inflammation
People who have a gene variant associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease also tend to have changes in the fluid around their brain and spinal cord that are detectable years before symptoms arise, according to new research from Duke Health. (2021-02-11)

Meet the Smurfs: A bone metabolism family
Researchers from Osaka University and Ehime University have found that protein Smurf2 can regulate a cellular pathway that affects bone metabolism. Smurf2 can mark certain messenger proteins--specifically those that are part of the bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathway--for destruction to prevent the signals from going out of control. The BMP-induced bone in mice without Smurf2 had higher mass and formation rates. These findings improve our understanding of various bone defects. (2021-02-08)

Fetal surgery for spina bifida leads to better mobility in school-age children
Adding to a growing body of research affirming the benefits of fetal surgery for spina bifida, new findings show prenatal repair of the spinal column confers physical gains that extend into childhood. The researchers found that children who had undergone fetal surgery for myelomeningocele, the most severe form of spina bifida, were more likely than those who received postnatal repair to walk independently, go up and down stairs, and perform self-care tasks like using a fork, washing hands and brushing teeth. (2021-02-08)

MSK researchers learn what's driving 'brain fog' in people with COVID-19
A unique collaboration among experts from several areas within MSK leads to findings about how inflammation appears to be driving the neurologic effects seen in some COVID-19 patients. (2021-02-08)

In-silico modelling helps with the integrated study of the intervertebral disc in health and disease
Published in the journal Bioinformatics and conducted entirely by members of the BCN MedTech Research Unit, with Laura Baumgartner as first author under the guidance of Jérôme Noailly. (2021-02-05)

X-Stop® vs Laminectomy for lumbar spinal stenosis: Quality of life and cost-effectiveness
A randomized controlled trial of the X-Stop® interspinous distractor device and open laminectomy in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Both procedures improved the patients' quality of life; however, overall, laminectomy gave patients a better quality of life and was also more cost-effective. (2021-02-02)

Childhood trauma could affect development, treatment of multiple sclerosis
Childhood trauma could affect the trajectory of multiple sclerosis development and response to treatment in adulthood, a new study in mice found. Mice that had experienced stress when young were more likely to develop the autoimmune disorder and less likely to respond to a common treatment, researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign found. However, treatment that activated an immune-cell receptor mitigated the effects of childhood stress in the mice. (2021-01-29)

Robotic exoskeleton training expands options for stroke rehabilitation
Researchers are applying new technologies to gait training that may offer advantages over traditional labor intensive physical therapy. This inpatient study of a robotic exoskeleton (Ekso GT, Ekso Bionics, Inc,) demonstrated the potential to improve gait training after acute stroke toward the goal of earlier recovery of motor function. ''We found that gait training in the exoskeleton allowed us to increase the dose of gait training without increasing the duration of inpatient rehabilitation,'' said Dr. Nolan, (2021-01-29)

New treatment helps patients with a spinal cord injury
Spinal cord injuries disrupt the mechanism by which our bodies regulate blood pressure. A team of Swiss and Canadian scientists have developed a treatment that allows patients to regain control of their blood pressure, using targeted electrical spinal-cord stimulation. No medication is required. The team's findings were published today in Nature. (2021-01-28)

First study to look at potency of maternal antibodies
In a new study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, researchers will unveil findings that suggest that women who contract COVID-19 during pregnancy are able to make antibodies, but that transfer of these antibodies to their infants is less than expected. (2021-01-28)

How does the immune system keep tabs on the brain?
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that immune cells stationed in the meninges, the tissue that covers the brain and spinal cord, monitor the brain and initiate an immune response if they detect a problem. (2021-01-27)

Research finds blood pressure can be controlled without drugs after spinal cord injury
Canadian and Swiss researchers have created the first platform to understand the mechanisms underlying blood pressure instability after spinal cord injury. The discovery has led to a new cutting-edge solution. Spinal cord stimulators can bridge the body's autonomous regulation system, controlling blood pressure without medication. Findings are published in Nature. (2021-01-27)

Mouse study: gabapentin prevents harmful structural changes in spinal cord
Research led by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and College of Medicine found that the widely prescribed pain-relief drug gabapentin can prevent harmful structural changes in the injured spinal cords of mice, and also block cardiovascular changes and immune suppression caused by spinal cord injury. (2021-01-26)

Fine tuning first-responder immune cells may reduce TBI damage
Immediately after a traumatic brain injury and as long as one year later, there are increased levels of immune cells called ILCs in the brain promoting inflammation, which can worsen brain damage, scientists report. They also report for the first time that the cell energy sensor AMPK is a brake that can stop what becomes a chronic state of destructive inflammation driven by these ILCs, or innate lymphoid cells. (2021-01-25)

University of Cincinnati student uses zebrafish to study spinal deformities
Oriana Zinani, a doctoral student in molecular developmental biology at the University of Cincinnati, is part of a team of researchers using zebrafish embryos to study a gene mutation that causes scoliosis, a sideways curvature of the spine that typically occurs in humans just before puberty. (2021-01-22)

New technique to fast-track pain research
Scientists have for the first time established a sensory neuron model able to mass-reproduce two key sensory neuron types involved in pain sensation, enabling the easy generation of large numbers of the cells to fast-track chronic pain research. Using a new technique, researchers at Flinders University have found a way to reproduce millions of the cells, providing ample resources for the simultaneous testing of thousands of samples or potential drug libraries. (2021-01-21)

Designer cytokine makes paralyzed mice walk again
To date, paralysis resulting from spinal cord damage has been irreparable. With a new therapeutic approach, scientists from the Department for Cell Physiology at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) headed by Professor Dietmar Fischer have succeeded for the first time in getting paralyzed mice to walk again. The keys to this are the protein hyper-interleukin-6, which stimulates nerve cells to regenerate, and the way how it is supplied to the animals. (2021-01-15)

Study demonstrates efficacy of new treatment for neurofibromatosis type 1-related tumors
Based on preclinical studies of an investigational drug to treat peripheral nerve tumors, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) as part of the Neurofibromatosis Clinical Trials Consortium have shown that the drug, cabozantinib, reduces tumor volume and pain in patients with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The results of the Phase 2 clinical trial, co-chaired by Michael J. Fisher, MD at CHOP, were published recently in Nature Medicine. (2021-01-14)

Study suggests compound protects myelin, nerve fibers
A compound developed at Oregon Health & Science University appears to protect nerve fibers and the fatty sheath, called myelin, that covers nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. The new research in a mouse model advances earlier work to develop the compound - known as sobetirome - that has already showed promise in stimulating the repair of myelin. (2021-01-13)

Imaging technique proves effective in measuring mitochondrial dysfunction in motor neuron disease (MND)
Non-invasive imaging technique called 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy used to measure mitochondrial function in patients with motor neuron disease (MND) (2021-01-13)

New treatment allows some people with spinal cord injury to regain hand and arm function
University of Washington researchers helped six Seattle-area people with spinal cord injuries regain some hand and arm mobility. (2021-01-12)

Tapping the brain to boost stroke rehabilitation
Stroke survivors who had ceased to benefit from conventional rehabilitation gained clinically significant arm movement and control by using an external robotic device powered by the patients' own brains. (2021-01-12)

GridTape: An automated electron microscopy platform
Scientists have developed an automated, faster, and more rapid electron microscopy technique, called GridTape, that enables them to label and read the location of every neuron in a tissue sample. The team used GridTape to map the circuity of the spinal cord nerve of the fruit fly. The technique not only provides a comprehensive map of neuronal circuits; it can also be used to study nerve circuitry in larger animal systems. (2021-01-11)

Drug combination increases susceptibility to chemotherapy in cases of severe neuroblastoma
Researchers at the University of Gothenburg now suggest a possible cure for children with hard-to-treat forms of neuroblastoma using a new combination of drugs. In a new study in the journal Cancer Research, they describe how a two small molecule-based drug combination likely inhibit the tumor's growth. (2021-01-07)

IU research findings could reduce treatment-related complication for blood cancer patients
Researchers at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center published promising findings today in the New England Journal of Medicine on preventing a common complication to lifesaving blood stem cell transplantation in leukemia. (2021-01-07)

Neuronal circuits for fine motor skills
Writing, driving a screw or throwing darts are only some of the activities that demand a high level of skill. How the brain masters such exquisite movements has now been described in the journal ''Nature'' by a team of researchers at the University of Basel and the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research. A map of brainstem circuits reveals which neurons control the fine motor skills of the arm and hand. (2021-01-06)

Scientists explore deficits in processing speed in individuals with spinal cord injury
This study is the first to examine the neural mechanisms of higher order cognitive tasks of individuals with SCI.''Our ability to observe brain activation while the individual performs specific cognitive tasks provides new information on the mechanisms that underlie the cognitive deficits that we now know affect a substantial proportion of the SCI population,'' Dr. Wylie said. ''Developing treatments targeted to these deficits depends on our pursuit of this line of research, which may benefit other populations affected by delayed processing speed.'' (2020-12-30)

Immersive virtual reality boosts the effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation for chronic pain
For patients receiving spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for chronic pain, integration with an immersive virtual reality (VR) system - allowing patients to see as well as feel the effects of electrical stimulation on a virtual image of their own body - can enhance the pain-relieving effectiveness of SCS, reports a study in PAIN®, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-12-23)

A new species of mammal may have been found in Africa's montane forests
A research team from the University of Helsinki has discovered a tree hyrax in the Taita Hills, Kenya, which may belong to a species previously unknown to science. (2020-12-22)

Connections determine everything
A team of scientists, with the first author from the HSE University, were investigating which factors are the most important for the upper limb motor recovery after a stroke. The study is published in Stroke, the world's leading journal for cerebrovascular pathology. (2020-12-16)

Neuroregenerative gene therapy
Spinal cord injury (SCI) often causes disability and seriously compromises quality of life. The major reasons for the difficulty of treatment for SCI might be due to the fact that many neurons are lost during the injury, leading to permanent loss of neural functions. An innovative gene therapy approach regenerated functional new neurons using local glial cells in the injured spinal cord, bringing new hope to millions of SCI patients worldwide. (2020-12-16)

HSS bone study sheds light on complications after spinal surgery
The microscopic structure of bone appears to predict which patients will experience poor outcomes after spinal fusion, according to a new study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City. (2020-12-15)

Robotic exoskeleton training improves walking in adolescents with acquired brain injury
'At the end of the 4-week training, participants had progressed to a more normal gait pattern,' said Dr. Karunakaran, 'including improved loading, a longer step length and faster walking speed' Although results are promising, Dr. Nolan acknowledged the limitations of the study, including small sample size and lack of a control group: 'Further study is needed to confirm the training effect in this age group with ABI, optimal dosing for the training protocol, and the durability of functional improvements.' (2020-12-14)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.