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Current Spinal Cord News and Events

Current Spinal Cord News and Events, Spinal Cord News Articles.
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Revealing how flies make decisions on the fly to survive
Many insects process visual information to make decisions about controlling their flying skills and movements- flies must decide whether to pursue prey, avoid a predator, maintain their flight trajectory or land based on their perceptions. (2020-05-28)
How preserve the properties of polyphenols and flavonoids in oncological treatments?
A new technique preserves the anti-carcinogenic properties of polyphenols and flavonoids in oncological treatments. (2020-05-27)
Framework helps clinicians identify serious spinal pathology
Rehabilitation clinicians and other health care professionals now have a framework for assessing and managing people who may have serious spinal pathologies. (2020-05-27)
It may take up to a year to get through elective surgeries due to COVID-19
A new study by Johns Hopkins researchers found that it may take between seven and 16 months for surgeons to complete the backlog of elective orthopaedic surgeries that have been suspended during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-05-26)
New studies reveal extent and risks of laughing gas & stimulant abuse among young people
In one study, researchers from Turkey reported increasing stimulant use among medical students approaching their final exams, despite the substantial risks to their health. (2020-05-23)
Brain's 'updating mechanisms' may create false memories
The research, published in Current Biology, is one of the first comprehensive characterizations of poorly formed memories and may offer a framework to explore different therapeutic approaches to fear, memory and anxiety disorders. (2020-05-21)
Tick-borne encephalitis spread across Eurasia with settlers and their pets and prey
Researchers from Sechenov University together with colleagues from several Russian institutes analysed data on the RNA structure of tick-borne encephalitis virus. (2020-05-21)
Cutting edge two-photon microscopy system breaks new grounds in retinal imaging
In a recent breakthrough, a team of HKUST scientists developed an adaptive optics two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy using direct wavefront sensing for high-resolution in vivo fluorescence imaging of mouse retina, which allow in vivo fundus imaging at an unprecedented resolution after full AO correction. (2020-05-20)
Cord blood study provides insights on benefits, limitations for autism treatment
In a recent study, Duke researchers tested whether a single infusion of a unit of a child's own or donor cord blood could improve social communication skills in children between the ages of 2-7 diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. (2020-05-19)
Not all multiple sclerosis-like diseases are alike
Scientists say some myelin-damaging disorders have a distinctive pathology that groups them into a unique disease entity. (2020-05-18)
One in ten patients with major vascular event, infection, or cancer will be misdiagnosed
According to a new study published in De Gruyter's open access journal Diagnosis, approximately one in 10 people (9.6%) in the United States with symptoms caused by major vascular events, infections, or cancers will be misdiagnosed. (2020-05-15)
'Cell pores' discovery gives hope to millions of brain and spinal cord injury patients
Scientists have discovered a new treatment to dramatically reduce swelling after brain and spinal cord injuries, offering hope to 75 million victims worldwide each year. (2020-05-14)
Developing microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) for inoperable cancer
An innovative radiation treatment that could one day be a valuable addition to conventional radiation therapy for inoperable brain and spinal tumors is a step closer, thanks to new research led by University of Saskatchewan (USask) researchers at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). (2020-05-13)
Scientists show MRI predicts the efficacy of a stem cell therapy for brain injury
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute and Loma Linda University Health have demonstrated the promise of applying magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to predict the efficacy of using human neural stem cells to treat a brain injury -- a first-ever 'biomarker' for regenerative medicine that could help personalize stem cell treatments for neurological disorders and improve efficacy. (2020-05-12)
Researchers find the 'brain's steering wheel' in the brainstem of mice
In a new study in mice, neuroscientists from the University of Copenhagen have found neurons in the brain that control how the mice turn right and left. (2020-05-12)
Bioethicist calls out unproven and unlicensed 'stem cell treatments' for COVID-19
As the COVID-19 pandemic enters its third month, businesses in the United States are marketing unlicensed and unproven stem-cell-based 'therapies' and exosome products that claim to prevent or treat the disease. (2020-05-07)
NUS researchers develop novel device to improve performance of underactive bladders
Researchers from NUS and the University of Tokyo have developed a new device that can monitor bladder volume in real-time and effectively empty the bladder. (2020-05-05)
Electrical activity in living organisms mirrors electrical fields in atmosphere
A new Tel Aviv University study provides evidence for a direct link between electrical fields in the atmosphere and those found in living organisms, including humans. (2020-05-05)
University of Arizona researchers identify potential pathway to make opioids safer, more effective
Researchers from the UArizona College of Medicine -- Tucson Department of Pharmacology found that inhibiting heat shock protein 90 in the spinal cord enhanced the efficacy of morphine -- a finding that could be used decrease the adverse side effects of opioid therapy. (2020-05-05)
Temple scientists regenerate neurons in mice with spinal cord injury and optic nerve damage
Each year thousands of patients face life-long losses in sensation and motor function from spinal cord injury and related conditions in which axons are badly damaged or severed. (2020-04-30)
Rat spinal cords control neural function in biobots
Biological robots draw inspiration from natural systems to mimic the motions of organisms, such as swimming or jumping. (2020-04-28)
Spinal cord gives bio-bots walking rhythm
Miniature biological robots are making greater strides than ever, thanks to the spinal cord directing their steps. (2020-04-28)
A promising new treatment for recurrent pediatric brain cancer
Researchers developed a novel approach that delivers appropriately-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy directly into the cerebrospinal fluid that surrounds recurrent pediatric brain tumors. (2020-04-27)
Potential autism biomarker found in babies, Stanford-led study reports
A biological marker in infants that appears to predict an autism diagnosis has been identified in a small study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2020-04-27)
Researchers restore injured man's sense of touch using brain-computer interface technology
On April 23 in the journal Cell, a team of researchers report that they have been able to restore sensation to the hand of a research participant with a severe spinal cord injury using a brain-computer interface (BCI) system. (2020-04-23)
Spinal cord injury increases risk for mental health disorders
A new study finds adults with traumatic spinal cord injury are at an increased risk of developing mental health disorders and secondary chronic diseases compared to adults without the condition. (2020-04-21)
Co-delivery of IL-10 and NT-3 to enhance spinal cord injury repair
Spinal cord injury (SCI) creates a complex microenvironment that is not conducive to repair; growth factors are in short supply, whereas factors that inhibit regeneration are plentiful. (2020-04-17)
Study shows it is safe to give antibiotics to mothers after umbilical cord clamping in C-sections, to avoid exposure of newborns
New research to be presented at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) shows that it is safe to give antibiotics to mothers after umbilical cord clamping in cesarean section, rather than before, to avoid exposure of the newborn baby to these drugs. (2020-04-17)
Researchers discover treatment for spasticity in mice, following spinal cord injuries
In experiments with mice, researchers have studied neuronal mechanisms and found a way to by and large prevent spasticity from developing after spinal cord injuries. (2020-04-16)
When damaged, the adult brain repairs itself by going back to the beginning
When adult brain cells are injured, they revert to an embryonic state, say researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine. (2020-04-15)
UTSW researchers use snake venom to solve structure of muscle protein
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have uncovered the detailed shape of a key protein involved in muscle contraction. (2020-04-15)
Archaeology: Ancient string discovery sheds light on Neanderthal life
The discovery of the oldest known direct evidence of fiber technology -- using natural fibers to create yarn -- is reported in Scientific Reports this week. (2020-04-09)
Neanderthal cord weaver
Contrary to popular belief, Neanderthals were no less technologically advanced than Homo sapiens. (2020-04-09)
Alarming abusive head trauma revealed in computational simulation impact study
Abusive head trauma (AHT), like that of Shaken Baby Syndrome, is the leading cause of fatal brain injuries in children under two. (2020-04-09)
Common protein in skin can 'turn on' allergic itch
A commonly expressed protein in skin -- periostin -- can directly activate itch-associated neurons in the skin, according to new research. (2020-04-07)
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA): Newborn screening promises a benefit
The earliest possible diagnosis and treatment of infantile SMA through newborn screening leads to better motor development and less need for permanent ventilation as well as fewer deaths. (2020-04-06)
Mayo Clinic research finds spina bifida surgery before birth restores brain structure
Surgery performed on a fetus in the womb to repair defects from spina bifida triggers the body's ability to restore normal brain structure, Mayo Clinic research discovered. (2020-04-01)
Unearthing gut secret paves way for targeted treatments
Scientists have identified a specific type of sensory nerve ending in the gut and how these communicate pain or discomfort to the brain, paving the way for targeted treatments for common conditions like ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome or chronic constipation. (2020-03-29)
Scientists identify gene that first slows, then accelerates, progression of ALS in mice
Columbia scientists have provided new insights into how mutations in a gene called TBK1 cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive neurodegenerative disease that robs patients of movement, speech and ultimately, their lives. (2020-03-27)
New 'more effective' stem cell transplant method could aid blood cancer patients
Researchers at UCL have developed a new way to make blood stem cells present in the umbilical cord 'more transplantable', a finding in mice which could improve the treatment of a wide range of blood diseases in children and adults. (2020-03-26)
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