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Current Spinal Cord News and Events, Spinal Cord News Articles.
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Brain mapping study suggests motor regions for the hand also connect to the entire body
In a paper publishing March 26 in the journal Cell, investigators report that they have used microelectrode arrays implanted in human brains to map out motor functions down to the level of the single nerve cell. (2020-03-26)
Changing how we think about warm perception
Perceiving warmth requires input from a surprising source: cool receptors. (2020-03-24)
Study sheds light on fatty acid's role in 'chemobrain' and multiple sclerosis
Medical experts have always known myelin, the protective coating of nerve cells, to be metabolically inert. (2020-03-23)
Getting groundbreaking medical technology out of the lab
New medical technologies hold immense promise for treating a range of conditions. (2020-03-16)
NCAM2 protein plays a decisive role in the formation of structures for cognitive learning
The molecule NCAM2, a glycoprotein from the superfamily of immunoglobulins, is a vital factor in the formation of the cerebral cortex, neuronal morphogenesis and formation of neuronal circuits in the brain, as stated in the new study published in the journal Cerebral Cortex. (2020-03-13)
The need for speed
Scientists at the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bangalore show that parallel neural pathways that bypass the brain's tight frequency control enable animals to move faster. (2020-03-12)
New strategies for managing bowel and bladder dysfunction after spinal cord injury
Two complications have emerged as top priorities for spinal cord injury researchers -- neurogenic bowel and neurogenic bladder. (2020-03-12)
Combined tissue engineering provides new hope for spinal disc herniations
A promising new tissue engineering approach may one day improve outcomes for patients who have undergone discectomy -- the primary surgical remedy for spinal disc herniations. (2020-03-11)
New clinical trial examines a potential noninvasive solution for overactive bladders
Keck Medicine of USC urologists are launching a clinical trial to evaluate the effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation in patients with an overactive bladder due to neurological conditions, such as a spinal cord injury or stroke, and idiopathic (unknown) causes. (2020-03-10)
Boosting energy levels within damaged nerves may help them heal
When the spinal cord is injured, the damaged nerve fibers -- called axons -- are normally incapable of regrowth, leading to permanent loss of function. (2020-03-03)
IU scientists study link between energy levels, spinal cord injury
A team of researchers from Indiana University School of Medicine, in collaboration with the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, have investigated how boosting energy levels within damaged nerve fibers or axons may represent a novel therapeutic direction for axonal regeneration and functional recovery. (2020-03-03)
UBCO professor simplifies exercise advice for spinal cord injury
Professor Kathleen Martin Ginis says a major barrier to physical activity for people with a spinal cord injury is a lack of knowledge or resources about the amount and type of activity needed to achieve health and fitness benefits. (2020-03-02)
Blood test method may predict Alzheimer's protein deposits in brain
Researchers report an advance in the development of a blood test that could help detect pathological Alzheimer's disease in people who are showing signs of dementia. (2020-03-02)
Researchers identify protein critical for wound healing after spinal cord injury
Plexin-B2, an axon guidance protein in the central nervous system (CNS), plays an important role in wound healing and neural repair following spinal cord injury (SCI), according to research conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in Nature Neuroscience (2020-03-02)
CHOP researchers develop novel approach to capture hard-to-view portion of colon in 3D
In a groundbreaking discovery, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) developed a new imaging method that allows scientists to view the enteric nervous system (ENS) -- a key part of the human colon -- in three dimensions by making other colon cells that normally block it invisible. (2020-02-27)
ALS mystery illuminated by blue light
The first optogenetic ALS animal model is developed using zebrafish, in which the key symptoms of ALS, including TDP-43 aggregation, are reproducible in the intact neuromuscular system by external light illumination. (2020-02-26)
A tadpole with a twist: Left-right asymmetric development of Oikopleura dioica
Oikopleura dioica, a tadpole-like tunicate, shows a left-right patterning strategy that is distinct from other chordates, with left-right asymmetry emerging in the four-cell embryo. (2020-02-26)
Spinal deformities in Sacramento-San Joaquin delta fish linked to toxic mineral selenium
Native fish discovered with spinal deformities in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in 2011 were exposed to high levels of selenium from their parents and food they ate as juveniles in the San Joaquin River, new research has found. (2020-02-24)
Supplementing diet with amino acid successfully staves off signs of ALS in pre-clinical study
The addition of dietary L-serine, a naturally occurring amino acid necessary for formation of proteins and nerve cells, delayed signs of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in an animal study. (2020-02-24)
New study indicates amino acid may be useful in treating ALS
A naturally occurring amino acid is gaining attention as a possible treatment for ALS following a new study published in the Journal of Neuropathology & Experimental Neurology. (2020-02-20)
Magnet-controlled bioelectronic implant could relieve pain
A Rice University electrical and computer engineer has introduced the first neural implant that can be programmed and charged remotely with a magnetic field. (2020-02-19)
Complications of measles can include hepatitis, appendicitis, and viral meningitis, doctors warn
The complications of measles can be many and varied, and more serious than people might realise, doctors have warned in the journal BMJ Case Reports after treating a series of adults with the infection. (2020-02-17)
Gene therapy can protect against ALS and SMA-related cell death
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the University of Milan in Italy have identified a gene in human neurons that protects against the degeneration of motor neurons in the deadly diseases ALS and SMA. (2020-02-17)
Gene associated with autism also controls growth of the embryonic brain
A UCLA-led study reveals a new role for a gene that's associated with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability and language impairment. (2020-02-12)
Initial protective role of nervous system's 'star-shaped cells' in sporadic motor neuron disease uncovered
Support cells in the nervous system help protect motor neurons in the early-stages of sporadic motor neuron disease, according to new research from the Crick and UCL. (2020-02-10)
Supervisors share effective ways to include people with disabilities in the workplace
Among the 201 7 survey's findings were processes that were effective, but underutilized by organizations, according to Dr. (2020-02-07)
Growing new blood vessels could provide new treatment for recovering movement
New research published today in The Journal of Physiology highlights the link between loss of the smallest blood vessels in muscle and difficulties moving and exercising. (2020-02-06)
Computer simulation for understanding brain cancer growth
Scientists have developed a computer simulation, BioDynaMo that can be used on standard laptops or desktop computers and provides a software platform which can be used to easily create, run and visualise 3D agent-based biological simulations for brain cancers. (2020-02-06)
Abnormal bone formation after trauma explained and reversed in mice
New study findings implicate a specific type of immune cell behind heterotopic ossification, or abnormal bone formation and present a possible target for treatment. (2020-02-06)
Bridging the gap between AI and the clinic
Researchers trained machine learning algorithms on data from more than 62,000 patients with a meningioma. (2020-02-06)
Activating immune cells could revitalize the aging brain, study suggests
Researchers at Albany Medical College in New York have discovered that a specific type of immune cell accumulates in older brains, and that activating these cells improves the memory of aged mice. (2020-02-05)
Fiber crossings ahead: Key enzymes affecting nervous system pathway identified
University of Tsukuba researchers found the absence of enzymes key for corticospinal tract guidance, Sulf1 and Sulf2, results in abnormal anatomy of the corticospinal tract and impairments in fine motor function. (2020-02-05)
Wilderness Medical Society issues important new clinical practice guidelines
The Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) has released new clinical practice guidelines in a supplement to Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, published by Elsevier. (2020-02-05)
New discovery provides hope for improved multiple sclerosis therapies
Scientists from Trinity College Dublin have made an important discovery that could lead to more effective treatments for people living with multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. (2020-02-04)
Dietary interventions may slow onset of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders
Significantly reducing dietary levels of the amino acid methionine could slow onset and progression of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis in high-risk individuals, according to findings published today in Cell Metabolism. (2020-02-04)
How and when spines changed in mammalian evolution
Researchers compared modern and ancient animals to explore how mammalian vertebrae have evolved into sophisticated physical structures that can carry out multiple functions. (2020-02-03)
HKUST researchers find that regulating lipid metabolism in neurons helps axon regeneration
Regenerative medicine is the study of repairing tissue and organ function that is lost due to injury, aging, or disease. (2020-01-30)
Immune response in brain, spinal cord could offer clues to treating neurological diseases
An unexpected research finding is providing information that could lead to new treatments of certain neurological diseases and disorders, including multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's. (2020-01-30)
New injection technique may boost spinal cord injury repair efforts
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues, describe a new method for delivering neural precursor cells to spinal cord injuries in rats, reducing the risk of further injury and boosting the propagation of potentially reparative cells. (2020-01-29)
NIH study finds benefits of fetal surgery for spina bifida persist through school age
Children as young as 6 years old who underwent fetal surgery to repair a common birth defect of the spine are more likely to walk independently and have fewer follow-up surgeries, compared to those who had traditional corrective surgery after birth, according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health. (2020-01-24)
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