Current Spinning News and Events

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How to keep drones flying when a motor fails
Robotics researchers at the University of Zurich show how onboard cameras can be used to keep damaged quadcopters in the air and flying stably -- even without GPS. (2021-01-13)

Sound waves spin droplets to concentrate, separate nanoparticles
Mechanical engineers at Duke University have devised a method for spinning individual droplets of liquid to concentrate and separate nanoparticles for biomedical purposes. The technique is much more efficient than traditional centrifuge approaches, working its magic in under a minute instead of taking hours or days, and requires only a tiny fraction of the typical sample size. The invention could underline new approaches to applications ranging from precision bioassays to cancer diagnosis. (2020-12-18)

Oceans without oxygen
With no dissolved oxygen to sustain animals or plants, ocean anoxic zones are areas where only microbes suited to the environment can live. (2020-12-17)

Ultracold atoms reveal a new type of quantum magnetic behavior
An MIT experiment with ultracold atoms reveals new quantum magnetic behavior that may help in design of spintronic devices and magnetic materials. (2020-12-16)

Supercomputer simulations could unlock mystery of Moon's formation
Astronomers have taken a step towards understanding how the Moon might have formed out of a giant collision between the early Earth and another massive object 4.5 billion years ago. (2020-12-03)

How does the spider spin its self-assembled silk?
Kyoto University researchers report on a new model for spider silk assembly. The key to spider silk 'spinning' is a combination of acidification and a process known as liquid-liquid phase separation, or LLPS. (2020-11-30)

A pressure sensor at your fingertips
Researchers have developed an ultrathin pressure sensor that can be attached directly to the skin. It can measure how fingers interact with objects to produce useful data for medical and technological applications. The sensor has minimal effect on the users' sensitivity and ability to grip objects, and it is resistant to disruption from rubbing. The team also hopes their sensor can be used for the novel task of digitally archiving the skills of craft workers. (2020-11-19)

Birth of magnetar from colossal collision potentially spotted for first time
Researchers spotted a short gamma ray burst 10 times brighter than predicted. The mysterious brightness might signal the birth of a rare magnetar, formed from two neutron stars merging, which has never before been observed. (2020-11-12)

Software spots and fixes hang bugs in seconds, rather than weeks
Hang bugs - when software gets stuck, but doesn't crash - can frustrate both users and programmers, taking weeks for companies to identify and fix. Now researchers from North Carolina State University have developed software that can spot and fix the problems in seconds. (2020-10-12)

Nanoscale machines convert light into work
Researchers have developed a tiny new machine that converts laser light into work. These optically powered machines self-assemble and could be used for nanoscale manipulation of tiny cargo for applications such as nanofluidics and particle sorting. (2020-10-08)

Scientists peer inside an asteroid
New findings from NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission suggest that the interior of the asteroid Bennu could be weaker and less dense than its outer layers--like a crème-filled chocolate egg flying though space. (2020-10-08)

Solving the strange storms on Jupiter
Geometric storm patterns on Jupiter's south pole have been a mystery to scientists, but Caltech researchers may have uncovered how they form. (2020-09-23)

Blood vessel growth in muscle is reduced in women after menopause
A new study from the University of Copenhagen's Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports demonstrates that formation of small blood vessels is impaired in the muscle tissue of postmenopausal women. The study's findings highlight the importance of physical activity for women prior to and during menopause, as a means to prevent the development of disease later in life. (2020-09-22)

Elements of surprise: neutron stars contribute little, but something's making gold, research finds
Neutron star collisions do not create the quantity of chemical elements previously assumed, a new analysis of galaxy evolution finds. The research also reveals that current models can't explain the amount of gold in the cosmos - creating an astronomical mystery. The work has produced a new-look Periodic Table, showing the stellar origins of naturally occurring elements from carbon to uranium. (2020-09-15)

Superconductors are super resilient to magnetic fields
A Professor at the University of Tsukuba provides a new theoretical mechanism that explains the ability of superconductive materials to bounce back from being exposed to a magnetic field. This work may lead to energy systems that operate without resistive losses. It is also useful for building qubits for quantum computers. (2020-09-10)

New technology lets quantum bits hold information for 10,000 times longer than previous record
Quantum bits, or qubits, can hold quantum information much longer now thanks to efforts by an international research team. The researchers have increased the retention time, or coherence time, to 10 milliseconds - 10,000 times longer than the previous record - by combining the orbital motion and spinning inside an atom. Such a boost in information retention has major implications for information technology developments since the longer coherence time makes spin-orbit qubits the ideal candidate for building large quantum computers. (2020-09-04)

UH Mānoa researchers predict location of novel candidate for mysterious dark energy
UH researchers explain what may be the cause of the universe's accelerating growth. (2020-09-01)

Tracing the cosmic origin of complex organic molecules with their radiofrequency footprint
How did organic matter reach the Earth in the first place? One way to ponder this question is by observing the distribution and abundance of complex organic molecules in interstellar gas clouds. However, detecting such molecules in the less dense regions of these gas clouds has been challenging. Now, scientists from Japan have found concluding evidence for the presence of a particular complex organic molecule in such a region for the first time. (2020-08-25)

Microscopic deformation of a neutron star inferred from a distance of 4500 light-years
Gravitational waves, which are ripples in spacetime, have recently provided a new window to the universe. But continuous gravitational waves, for example from a slightly deformed and spinning neutron star, a star which is incredibly dense, have so far not been detected. A recent research work by Prof. Sudip Bhattacharyya has inferred continuous gravitational waves from a neutron star and has estimated the stellar microscopic deformation from a distance of about 4500 light-years. (2020-08-20)

First ever observation of 'time crystals' interacting
For the first time ever, scientists have witnessed the interaction of a new phase of matter known as 'time crystals'. The discovery may lead to applications in quantum information processing. First theorised in 2012 by Nobel Laureate Frank Wilczek and identified in 2016, time crystals exhibit the bizarre property of being in constant, repeating motion in time despite no external input. (2020-08-17)

Research captures how human sperm swim in 3D
Using state-of-the-art 3D microscopy and mathematics, Dr Hermes Gadêlha from the University of Bristol, Dr Gabriel Corkidi and Dr Alberto Darszon from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, have reconstructed the movement of the sperm tail in 3D with high-precision. (2020-08-13)

How human sperm really swim: New research challenges centuries-old assumption
A breakthrough in fertility science by researchers from Bristol and Mexico has shattered the universally accepted view of how sperm 'swim'. (2020-07-31)

Solid-state intramolecular motions in continuous fibers for fluorescent humidity sensor
One striking feature of molecular rotors is their ability to change conformation with detectable optical signals through molecular motion when stimulated. However, due to the strong intermolecular interactions, synthetic molecular rotors have often relied on fluid environments. Scientists at Donghua University and HKUST take advantage of the solid-state intramolecular motion of aggregation-induced emission molecular rotors and one-dimensional fibers, developing highly sensitive optical fiber sensors that respond to ambient humidity rapidly and reversibly with observable chromatic fluorescence change. (2020-07-16)

Astronomers detect regular rhythm of radio waves, with origins unknown
Astronomers detect a regular pattern of radio bursts from 500 million light years away. (2020-06-17)

A* model
Like most galaxies, the Milky Way hosts a supermassive black hole at its center. Called Sagittarius A*, the object has captured astronomers' curiosity for decades. And now there is an effort to image it directly. (2020-06-12)

Cosmic quasars embrace 1970s fashion trend
Researchers have studied more than 300 quasars -- spinning black holes that produce beams of plasma. The team has found that the shape of these so-called astrophysical jets changes from parabolic to conical at some distance from the black hole, reminiscent of the iconic flared jeans of the '70s. By effectively measuring these 'cosmic pants,' the researchers aim to interpret the workings of the central engine that accelerates matter to nearly the speed of light at the centers of remote active galaxies. (2020-06-08)

K-State study reveals asymmetry in spin directions of galaxies
The patterns formed by spiral galaxies show that the universe may have a defined structure and suggest that the early universe could have been spinning, according to a Kansas State University computational astronomer. (2020-06-01)

The asteroids Ryugu and Bennu were formed by the destruction of a large asteroid
What is the origin of the asteroids Bennu and Ryugu, and of their spinning-top shape? Numerical simulations of large asteroid disruptions show that during such events, fragments are ejected and then reaccumulate forming aggregates, some of which have a spinning-top shape. Scientists conclude that the overall properties of Bennu and Ryugu could directly result from the disruption of their parent body. (2020-05-27)

Study finds electrical fields can throw a curveball
MIT researchers have discovered a phenomenon that could be harnessed to control the movement of tiny particles floating in suspension. This approach, which requires simply applying an external electric field, may ultimately lead to new ways of performing certain industrial or medical processes that require separation of tiny suspended materials. (2020-05-26)

When a spinning toy meets hydrodynamics: Point-of-care technology is set in motion
An IBS research team has reported a diagnostic fidget spinner (Dx-FS) that allows for highly sensitive and rapid diagnosis and prescription only with hand power. (2020-05-18)

Clever new robot rover design conquers sand traps
Built with wheeled appendages that can be lifted, a new robot developed at Georgia Tech with US Army funding has complex locomotion techniques robust enough to allow it to climb sand covered hills and avoid getting stuck. The robot has NASA interested for potential surveying of a planet or the Moon. (2020-05-14)

Mats made from nanofibers linked to a red wine chemical could help prevent oxidation
Spoiling foods, souring wine and worsening wounds have a common culprit -- a process called oxidation. Although the ill effects of these chemical reactions can be curtailed by antioxidants, creating a sturdy platform capable of providing prolonged antioxidant activity is an ongoing challenge. (2020-05-06)

An eclipsing binary millisecond pulsar discovered by FAST
Using the data obtained by the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST), a research team led by Professor PAN Zhichen and Prof. LI Di from the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) discovered an eclipsing binary millisecond pulsar in Globular Cluster (GC) Messier 92 (M92). (2020-04-24)

Ménière's disease: New clinical practice guideline
The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation published the Clinical Practice Guideline: Ménière's Disease today in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Ménière's disease is a disorder of the inner ear that includes episodes of vertigo with possible hearing loss, ringing or buzzing in the ear, or ear pressure. (2020-04-08)

Safety zone saves giant moons from fatal plunge
Numerical simulations showed that the temperature gradient in the disk of gas around a young gas giant planet could play a critical role in the development of a satellite system dominated by a single large moon, similar to Titan around Saturn. Researchers found that dust in the circumplanetary disk can create a 'safety zone,' which keeps the moon from falling into the planet as the system evolves. (2020-03-09)

In acoustic waves, engineers break reciprocity with 'spacetime-varying metamaterials'
Working in an emerging field known to as 'spacetime-varying metamaterials,' University at Buffalo engineers have demonstrated the ability to break reciprocity in acoustic waves. (2020-02-17)

Astronomers witness the dragging of space-time in stellar cosmic dance
An international team of astrophysicists led by Australian Professor Matthew Bailes, from the ARC Centre of Excellence of Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav), has shown exciting new evidence for 'frame-dragging'-- how the spinning of a celestial body twists space and time -- after tracking the orbit of a stellar pair for almost two decades. The data, which is further evidence for Einstein's theory of General Relativity, is published today (Jan. 31, 2020) in the prestigious journal, Science. (2020-01-30)

Stars need a partner to spin Universe's brightest explosions
When it comes to the biggest and brightest explosions seen in the Universe, University of Warwick astronomers have found that it takes two stars to make a gamma-ray burst. (2020-01-13)

NASA's Fermi Mission links nearby pulsar's gamma-ray 'halo' to antimatter puzzle
NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has discovered a faint but sprawling glow of high-energy light around a nearby pulsar. If visible to the human eye, this gamma-ray 'halo' would appear about 40 times bigger in the sky than a full Moon. (2019-12-19)

Consider marine life when implementing offshore renewable power
With countries adopting green energy practices, renewable energy now accounts for a third of the world's power. As this trend continues, more countries are looking to offshore energy sources to produce this renewable energy. In an Opinion publishing Dec. 17 in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution, researchers identify situations where green technology such as wind turbines, wave energy converters, and other marine renewable energy devices (MREDs) have had negative consequences on marine life. (2019-12-17)

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