Current Spintronics News and Events | Page 3

Current Spintronics News and Events, Spintronics News Articles.
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A new 2D magnet draws future devices closer
EPFL scientists have discovered a new type of 2D magnetic material that can be integrated into spintronic devices. (2019-06-17)

Small currents for big gains in spintronics
UTokyo researchers have created an electronic component that demonstrates functions and abilities important to future generations of computational logic and memory devices. It is between one and two orders of magnitude more power efficient than previous attempts to create a component with the same kind of behavior. This fact could help it realize developments in the emerging field of spintronics. (2019-06-13)

Manipulating electron spin using artificial molecular motors
Artificial molecular switches and machines have undergone rapid advances over the past several decades. Particularly, artificial molecular motors are highly attractive from the viewpoint of chirality switching during rotational steps. Now, researchers fabricated an electron's spin-filtering device that can switch the spin polarization direction by light irradiation or thermal treatment. The present results are beneficial to the development of solid-state functionalities emerging from nanosized motions of molecular switches. (2019-06-07)

Moving the needle on nanoscale imaging with single-molecule magnets
Amid intense research focus on magnetic single atoms and molecules -- which could serve as the smallest possible memory elements in quantum computing -- researchers report creating a sensor capable of measuring and imaging magnetic structures and interactions at the atomic scale, in unprecedented detail. (2019-05-16)

Physicists create prototype superefficient memory for future computers
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and their colleagues from Germany and the Netherlands have achieved material magnetization switching on the shortest timescales, at a minimal energy cost. They have thus developed a prototype of energy-efficient data storage devices. (2019-05-15)

The power of randomization: Magnetic skyrmions for novel computer technology
Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have succeeded in developing a key constituent of a novel unconventional computing concept. This constituent employs the same magnetic structures that are being researched in connection with storing electronic data on shift registers known as racetracks. (2019-05-06)

Unprecedented insight into two-dimensional magnets using diamond quantum sensors
For the first time, physicists at the University of Basel have succeeded in measuring the magnetic properties of atomically thin van der Waals materials on the nanoscale. They used diamond quantum sensors to determine the strength of the magnetization of individual atomic layers of the material chromium triiodide. In addition, they found a long-sought explanation for the unusual magnetic properties of the material. The journal Science has published the findings. (2019-04-25)

Neuron and synapse-mimetic spintronics devices developed
A research group from Tohoku University has developed spintronics devices which are promising for future energy-efficient and adoptive computing systems, as they behave like neurons and synapses in the human brain. (2019-04-17)

Ferromagnetic nanoparticle systems show promise for ultrahigh-speed spintronics
In the future, ultrahigh-speed spintronics will require ultrafast coherent magnetization reversal within a picosecond. While this may eventually be achieved via irradiation the small change of magnetization it generates has so far prevented any practical application of this technique. Now researchers report in Applied Physics Letters that they have explored ferromagnetic nanoparticles embedded within a semiconductor. Their theory was that the electric field of the terahertz pulse could be effectively applied to each nanoparticle. (2019-03-28)

Let's not make big waves
Due to its potential to make computers faster and smartphones more efficient, spintronics is considered a promising concept for the future of electronics. In a collaboration including the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (MPI-IS) and the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), a team of researchers has now successfully generated so-called spin waves much more easily and efficiently than was previously deemed possible. The researchers are presenting their results in the journal Physical Review Letters (DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.122.117202). (2019-03-27)

Nanoparticles help realize 'spintronic' devices
For the first time researchers have demonstrated a new way to perform functions essential to future computation three orders of magnitude faster than current commercial devices. The team lead by Associate Professor Shinobu Ohya, created a nanoscale spintronic semiconductor device that can partially switch between specific magnetic states trillions of times a second (terahertz -- THz), far beyond frequencies of devices at present. (2019-03-05)

Spin devices rev up
Electric currents drive all our electronic devices. The emerging field of spintronics looks to replace electric currents with what are known as spin currents. Researchers from the University of Tokyo have made a breakthrough in this area. Their discovery of the magnetic spin Hall effect could lead to low-power, high-speed and high-capacity devices. They have created sample devices which can further research into potential applications. (2019-03-05)

Development of nonvolatile spintronics-based 50uW microcontroller unit operating at 200MHz
Researchers at Tohoku University have announced the development of a nonvolatile microcontroller unit (MCU) which achieves both high performance and ultra-low power by utilizing spintronics-based VLSI design technology. (2019-02-20)

Theoretical model may help solve molecular mystery
When it comes to realizing low-power electronic devices, spintronics looks promising. However, to generate a suitable spin current, you need a relatively large magnet. An alternative method that uses a special type of molecule has been proposed, but the big question is: does it work? University of Groningen Ph.D. student Xu Yang has constructed a theoretical model which describes how to put this new method to the test. (2019-02-05)

New quantum system could help design better spintronics
Researchers have created a new testing ground for quantum systems in which they can literally turn certain particle interactions on and off, potentially paving the way for advances in spintronics. (2019-01-29)

Novel technology reduces energy consumption of MRAM and AI hardware
Researchers from Osaka University, in collaboration with the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) and Grenoble Alpes University, succeeded in efficiently controlling the direction of a nano-sized magnet by heating at high speed. The researchers also discovered that nano-magnets amplify microwave signals. These achievements will contribute to reducing power consumption for magnetoresistive random access memory and artificial intelligence devices, helping us move towards a super-smart society. (2019-01-20)

Spintronics 'miracle material' put to the test
In a paper published today in Nature Communications, Vardeny, along with Jingying Wang, Dali Sun (now at North Carolina State University) and colleagues present two devices built using perovskite to demonstrate the material's potential in spintronic systems. Its properties, Vardeny says, bring the dream of a spintronic transistor one step closer to reality. (2019-01-10)

Overtones can provide faster data communication
For the first time researchers have succeeded in producing what are known as spin wave overtones. The technology paves the way for increasing the data transmission rate of wireless communication. (2019-01-09)

Electronics of the future: A new energy-efficient mechanism using the Rashba effect
Scientists at Tokyo Tech proposed new quasi-1D materials for potential spintronic applications, an upcoming technology that exploits the spin of electrons. They performed simulations to demonstrate the spin properties of these materials and explained the mechanisms behind their behavior. (2018-12-27)

Pressure tuned magnetism paves the way for novel electronic devices
Using very sensitive magnetic probes, an international team of researchers has found surprising evidence that magnetism which emerges at the interfaces between non-magnetic oxide thin layers can be easily tuned by exerting tiny mechanical forces. This discovery provides a new and unexpected handle to control magnetism, thus enabling denser magnetic memory, and opens new and unexpected routes for developing novel oxide-based spintronic devices. (2018-12-17)

When heat ceases to be a mystery, spintronics becomes more real
The development of spintronics depends on materials that guarantee control over the flow of magnetically polarized currents. However, it is hard to talk about control when the details of heat transport through the interfaces between materials are unknown. This ''thermal'' gap in our material knowledge has just been filled thanks to the Polish-German team of physicists, who for the first time described in detail the dynamic phenomena occurring at the interface between a ferromagnetic metal and a semiconductor. (2018-12-13)

Supercomputers without waste heat
Physicists from the University of Konstanz explore superconductivity for information processing. (2018-12-07)

Reflecting antiferromagnetic arrangements
An x-ray imaging technique could help scientists understand the magnetic structure of promising materials for 'spin'-based electronics. (2018-12-05)

First observation of a square lattice of merons and antimerons
Scientists have, for the first time, observed a square lattice of merons and antimerons -- tiny magnetic vortices and antivortices that form in a thin plate of the helical magnet Co8Zn9Mn3. The ability to manipulate nanometer-scale spin textures such as merons and skyrmions is a key to the development of spintronics -- next-generation electronic devices that are very low in power consumption. (2018-12-05)

Environment turns molecule into a switch
For the first time, physicists from the University of Würzburg have successfully positioned an organic molecule on a substrate realizing two stable configurations. This may have application potential in molecular spintronics. (2018-11-26)

2-D magnetism: Atom-thick platforms for energy, information and computing research
A class of 2-D magnetic materials -- known as van der Waals materials -- may offer one of the most ambitious platforms yet to understand and control phases of matter at the nanoscale. (2018-10-31)

Understanding the building blocks for an electronic brain
Computer bits are binary, with a value of 0 or one. By contrast, neurons in the brain can have all kinds of different internal states, depending on the input that they received. This allows the brain to process information in a more energy-efficient manner than a computer. University of Groningen (UG) physicists are working on memristors, resistors with a memory, made from niobium-doped strontium titanate, which mimic how neurons work. (2018-10-21)

Exploring new spintronics device functionalities in graphene heterostructures
Graphene Flagship researchers have shown in a paper published in Science Advances how heterostructures built from graphene and topological insulators have strong, proximity induced spin-orbit coupling which can form the basis of novel information processing technologies. (2018-10-16)

Blue phosphorus -- mapped and measured for the first time
Until recently, the existence of 'blue' phosphorus was pure theory: Now an HZB team was able to examine samples of blue phosphorus at BESSY II for the first time and confirm via mapping of their electronic band structure that this is actually this exotic phosphorus modification. Blue phosphorus is an interesting candidate for new optoelectronic devices. (2018-10-15)

Heusler, weyl and berry
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute Chemical Physics of Solids have written a review paper about magnetic topological materials in the family of Heusler compounds. The review explains the connection between topology, symmetry and magnetism at a level suitable for undergraduate students in physics, chemistry and materials science with a basic knowledge of condensed matter physics. (2018-10-10)

Precise electron spin control yields faster memory storage
Enhancing the speed and reducing the size of data storage devices requires gaining control over the force making electrons spins. In a recent study published in EPJ B, John Kay Dewhurst and colleagues, have developed a new theory to predict the complex dynamics of spin procession in materials subjected to ultra-short laser pulses. The advantage of this approach is that it is predictive. (2018-10-09)

Nanoscale pillars as a building block for future information technology
Researchers from Linköping University and the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden propose a new device concept that can efficiently transfer the information carried by electron spin to light at room temperature -- a stepping stone towards future information technology. They present their approach in an article in Nature Communications. (2018-10-05)

Graphene bilayer provides efficient transport and control of spins
University of Groningen physicists in collaboration with a theoretical physics group from Universität Regensburg have built an optimized bilayer graphene device which displays both long spin lifetimes and electrically controllable spin-lifetime anisotropy. It has the potential for practical applications such as spin-based logic devices. The results were published in Physical Review Letters on 20 September. (2018-09-20)

When 80 microns is enough
Physicists report in Nature magazine how they have sent and controlled a spin current across longer distances than ever before -- and in a material that was previously considered unsuitable for the task. (2018-09-14)

New devices based on rust could reduce excess heat in computers
Scientists have succeeded in observing the first long-distance transfer of information in a magnetic group of materials known as antiferromagnets. (2018-09-13)

Detecting hydrogen using the extraordinary hall effect in cobalt-palladium thin films
Scientists looking to hydrogen as a next-generation clean energy source are developing hydrogen-sensing technologies, the most common of which uses palladium-based thin films because palladium readily absorbs hydrogen gas. However, it also readily absorbs other gases, decreasing the overall efficiency of these sensors. Researchers conducted a systematic study of hydrogen detection using the Extraordinary Hall Effect to measure the hydrogen magnetization response in cobalt-palladium thin films, and reports in the Journal of Applied Physics. (2018-09-12)

Novel nano material for quantum electronics
An international team led by Assistant Professor Kasper Steen Pedersen, DTU Chemistry, has synthesized a novel nano material with electrical and magnetic properties making it suitable for future quantum computers and other applications in electronics. (2018-09-10)

Scientists create 'impossible' materials in simple way
Scientists from NUST MISIS and colleagues from the University of Bayreuth, the University of Münster (Germany), the University of Chicago (US), and Linköping University (Sweden) have created nitrides, a material previously considered impossible to obtain. More amazing, they have shown that the material can be obtained using a very simple method of direct synthesis. Articles about the revolutionary research results have been published in Nature Communications and Angewandte Chemie International Edition. (2018-07-27)

EPFL uses excitons to take electronics into the future
EPFL researchers have developed a transistor based on excitons -- a type of particle most people have not heard of -- that is able to function at room temperature. This breakthrough could lead to a new breed of faster, more energy efficient and smaller electronics. (2018-07-25)

Underlying mechanism discovered for magnetic effect in superconducting spintronics
Superconductor-ferromagnet structures are widely regarded as the building blocks of superconducting spintronic technology. More conventional spintronic devices typically require large currents, so researchers are investigating the viability of low-resistance superconductors. Their new results could answer longstanding questions about how SF structures interact. They reveal a general mechanism of the long-range electromagnetic proximity effect in SF structures in Applied Physics Letters. (2018-07-10)

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