Current Sports Medicine News and Events

Current Sports Medicine News and Events, Sports Medicine News Articles.
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One in five has a mutation that provides superior resilience to cold
Almost one in five people lacks the protein α-actinin-3 in their muscle fibre. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden now show that more of the skeletal muscle of these individuals comprises slow-twitch muscle fibres, which are more durable and energy-efficient and provide better tolerance to low temperatures than fast-twitch muscle fibres. The results are published in the scientific journal The American Journal of Human Genetics. (2021-02-17)

How Spanish children get to school: New study on active commuting
The researchers analysed how Spanish children and adolescents get to school, based on studies examining the commuting patterns of 36,781 individuals over a 7-year period (2010-2017) (2021-02-17)

Clues for improving sleep in visually impaired athletes
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that approximately one-third of a group of visually impaired athletes had sleep disorders. A later wake-up time and stress regarding interpersonal relationships in competition activities were related to the rate of sleep disorders. Addressing these factors may be key in improving sleep quality in this population. (2021-02-14)

Age shall not weary them when it comes to discus and javelin
Discus and javelin throwers as well as marathon runners and race walkers are likely to achieve their best performances at a later age than sprinters, hurdlers and middle-distance runners. Why? It comes down to muscle fibres and technique. (2021-02-10)

New guidance on how cardiac patients with diabetes can exercise more safely
Cardiac patients who also have diabetes will be able to do their rehabilitation exercises more safely, thanks to the world's first guidance on the subject, which has been published by international experts including a Swansea University academic. The guidance will be a crucial resource for healthcare professionals, so they can help the growing number of cardiac rehabilitation patients who also have diabetes. (2021-02-04)

Blink! The link between aerobic fitness and cognition
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found evidence that spontaneous eye blink activity, which reflects activity in the dopaminergic system, explains the connection between fitness and cognitive function. This is the first study to indicate that dopamine has an essential role in linking aerobic fitness and cognition. These findings open the door to new research regarding the mechanisms by which exercise improves brain function, and may lead to novel fitness strategies for enhancing cognition. (2021-02-03)

Sport participation levels lower in students from lower socio-economic groups
Students from lower socio-economic groups (SEG) are less likely to participate in sport or physical activity at university, research from Sheffield Hallam University has found. (2021-02-01)

Study finds revised concussion guidelines shorten duration of symptoms
New research published in the Journal of Osteopathic Medicine shows adoption of the latest concussion guidelines can dramatically reduce symptoms in 11- to 18-year-old athletes with first-time concussions. The study's lead researcher, John Neidecker, DO, a sports concussion specialist in Raleigh, North Carolina, found the median length of concussion symptoms dropped from 1 month to 1 week in female athletes, and from 11 days to 5 days in male athletes. (2021-02-01)

Schoolchildren are learning about health through football (soccer)
Knowledge about health is a cornerstone in a child's development of physical and psychosocial health. A new study from the University of Southern Denmark shows that health knowledge in relation to diet, exercise, hygiene and wellbeing can be increased through a programme of European football exercises as part of school lessons. (2021-01-29)

Football and inclusion: It all comes down to the right motivational climate
Playing football has the potential to promote the inclusion of young people who are not from the predominant culture of a country, i.e. young migrants. Crucially, the feeling of belonging and being accepted depends on the trainer's approach to training - or more precisely, the motivational climate they create. Task-oriented training is significantly more suitable than training that is geared towards performance and competition. (2021-01-29)

Americans like sports, but heterosexual men especially do
Nearly nine out of 10 Americans say they enjoy sports at least a little, but heterosexual men more commonly identify as passionate sports fans, a new study suggests. A survey of nearly 4,000 American adults found that only 11% said they did not identify as sports fans at all. Over 40% were passionate fans, identifying themselves as being ''quite a bit'' or ''very much so'' sports fans. (2021-01-29)

Screening asymptomatic health care personnel for COVID-19 not recommended by experts
Routine screening of asymptomatic health care personnel in the absence of confirmed exposures to COVID-19 is not a recommended strategy for preventing transmission of COVID-19, according to a new review. It found that such testing is unlikely to affect the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in health care settings and could even have unintended negative consequences. (2021-01-28)

Risk analysis helps contend with uncertainty of in-person activities
People now have access to better real-time information about COVID-19 infection and transmission rates, but they still have to decide what is safe to do. A new model co-authored by mathematician John McCarthy at Washington University in St. Louis helps to contend with the uncertainty. (2021-01-28)

No overall difference in concussion recovery time for male and female college athletes
Researchers found female and male collegiate athletes take approximately the same amount of time to recover from a concussion, with subtle differences in recovery time depending on the type of sports being played and the division level of the sport. The findings suggest that equity in access to sports medical care among college athletes may be contributing to these similar outcomes. (2021-01-26)

Sport may fast-track numeracy skills for Indigenous children
Greater sports participation among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children is linked with better academic performance, according to new research from the University of South Australia. (2021-01-25)

Study recommends rugby league invests in young players' diets
New QUT study recommends NRL rugby league clubs 'invest' in young players' diets to aid performance and recovery with the research outlining specific nutritional needs for the high-impact sport. (2021-01-22)

Lack of sleep, stress can lead to symptoms resembling concussion
A new study suggests that a lot of people might be going through life with symptoms that resemble concussion - a finding supporting researchers' argument that athletes recovering from a brain injury should be assessed and treated on a highly individualized basis. (2021-01-22)

Using VR training to boost our sense of agency and improve motor control
Patients with motor dysfunctions are on the rise across Japan as its population continues to age. A Tohoku University researcher has developed a new method of rehabilitation using virtual reality to increase the sense of agency over our body and aid motor skills. (2021-01-20)

Clumsy kids can be fit too
Clumsy kids can be as aerobically fit as their peers with better motor skills, a new Finnish study shows. The results are based on research conducted at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences of the University of Jyväskylä and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Eastern Finland, and they were published in Translational Sports Medicine. (2021-01-19)

K-State medical director contributes to research behind updated CDC quarantine guidance
Kyle Goerl, the medical director of Kansas State University's Lafene Health Center, is part of a collaborative team that has published recent research on SARS-CoV-2 transmission and quarantine periods. (2021-01-11)

Hardly any sports -- but more physical activity during lockdown
In spring, when sports clubs closed due to the Corona pandemic, children looked for alternative physical activities. According to a study covering more than 1,700 children and adolescents as part of the Motorik-Modul Study (MoMo) conducted by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Karlsruhe University of Education (PHKA), the children were active about 36 minutes longer every day, but also spent an hour more in front of monitors. Results published in Scientific Reports. (2020-12-21)

Female athletes in WNBA don't return to elite performance for at least 2 years after ACL surgery
Study findings of ACL injuries in WNBA athletes sets return to sport expectations for all female athletes (2020-12-21)

Nearly half of young drivers are resuming driving just weeks after sustaining a concussion
Researchers found that nearly half of adolescents who sought specialty care for a concussion were back to driving when asked approximately two weeks after the injury, even though few had returned to exercise and sports. (2020-12-15)

The video referee in the spotlight
Since the 2019/20 season, controversial referee calls in the English Premier League may be technically reviewed and, if deemed necessary, corrected. Using a Twitter analysis of 129 games in the English Premier League, a research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now determined how decisions made by video referees affect the mood of the fans. (2020-12-14)

Age not just a number: Causes of joint stiffness differ between older and younger adults
As people age, joints become less flexible, causing balance problems that lower quality of life. Dr. Kosuke Hirata, Mr. Ryosuke Yamadera, and Prof. Ryota Akagi from the Shibaura Institute of Technology revealed that among younger adults, muscle but not nerve stiffness is associated with the ankle's range of motion (ROM), whereas only nerve stiffness is linked to ankle ROM among older adults. In other words, non-muscle tissue becomes more important for joint flexibility with age. (2020-11-25)

Neuroscientists measure fans' reactions to the big game
In a study published November 25 in the journal Neuron, researchers show how the feelings of surprise experienced while watching sports creates shifts in brain patterns. These shifts are important for neuroscientists to understand because they contribute to the formation of memories that are particularly strong. (2020-11-25)

Basketball on the brain: Neuroscientists use sports to study surprise
Princeton neuroscientists tracked the brains and pupils of self-described basketball fans as they watched March Madness games, to study how people process surprise -- an unexpected change of circumstances that shifts an anticipated outcome. They found that that shifts in the pattern of activity in high-level brain areas only happened at moments that contradicted the watchers' current beliefs about which team was more likely to win. (2020-11-25)

51% of Americans agree paying college athletes should be allowed
More Americans than not believe that college athletes should be allowed to be paid more than what it costs them to go to school, a new national study of nearly 4,000 people suggests. Findings from the National Sports and Society Survey (NSASS) suggest that 51 percent of adults agree that college athletes should have the ability to be paid above school costs, 41 percent disagree and 8 percent don't know. (2020-11-24)

OHIO professor publishes first article that looks at concussion risk in stunt performers
Dr. Jeff Russell, associate professor of athletic training within the College of Health Sciences and Professions at Ohio University, is shining a light on a segment of concussion patients who often go unnoticed in comparison to athletes: performing artists. (2020-11-23)

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy guideline encourages shared decision-making
The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology today released an updated guideline for managing patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The guideline encourages shared decision-making between the clinician and patient as essential when determining treatment course and updates recommendations for sudden cardiac death (SCD) risk assessment and HCM center referrals based on the latest evidence. (2020-11-20)

Simple measurement could transform injury rehabilitation
Researchers from Edith Cowan University in Western Australia have found a simple way to analyse the effectiveness of exercise training that could one day be conducted easily at a local gym or physio. Using vertical jumps as a test activity, the researchers could predict detailed information regarding technique and muscle activation patterns just through a relatively simple analysis of forces produced against the ground during the jump. (2020-11-19)

Racket sports may worsen knee arthritis
Racket sports like tennis and racquetball appear to accelerate knee joint degeneration in overweight people with osteoarthritis, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). (2020-11-17)

Stretchable 'skin' sensor gives robots human sensation
Cornell University researchers have created a fiber-optic sensor that combines low-cost LEDs and dyes, resulting in a stretchable ''skin'' that detects deformations such as pressure, bending and strain. This sensor could give soft robotic systems - and anyone using augmented reality technology - the ability to feel the same rich, tactile sensations that mammals depend on to navigate the natural world. (2020-11-12)

Team sport lowers blood pressure in postmenopausal women
Team sport effectively counteracts diminished vascular function in women with high blood pressure, even several years after the onset of menopause. Estrogen loss associated with transition into menopause increases women's risk of developing cardiovascular disease and reduces their ability to benefit from training. However, a new study from the Center for Team Sports and Health at the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen demonstrates that postmenopausal women do benefit from playing small-sided floorball twice a week. (2020-11-11)

For young athletes, inadequate sleep leads to decreased performance
Most young athletes don't get enough sleep - and that may significantly affect their sports performance, according to a paper in the November issue of Current Sports Medicine Reports, official journal of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-11-09)

Teens who participate in extracurriculars, get less screen time, have better mental health
A new study from UBC researchers finds that teens, especially girls, have better mental health when they spend more time taking part in extracurricular activities, like sports and art, and less time in front of screens. (2020-11-02)

Compression garments reduce strength loss after training
Regular training enhances your strength, but recovery is equally important. Elastic bandages and compression garments are widely used in sports to facilitate recovery and prevent injuries. Now, a research team from Tohoku University has determined that compression garments also reduce strength loss after strenuous exercise. (2020-10-30)

Menstrual dysfunction is more common among young athletes than among non-athletes
Menstrual dysfunction is more prevalent in young Finnish athletes than it is among non-athletes of a similar age, but athletes experience less body weight dissatisfaction than non-athletes do. These findings are from a recent study at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. The study was conducted among members of sports clubs who exercised at least four times a week (athletes) and non-members (non-athletes). (2020-10-28)

Sports science: quality wins games
''Quality Wins Games'' - this is the conclusion drawn by scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in their study ''Success Factors in Football: An Analysis of the German Bundesliga''. The most important success criteria they identified is avoiding errors in the defense, efficiency in scoring goals especially after counter-attacks and the market value of the team. The findings are reported in the International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport. (DOI: 10.1080/24748668.2020.1726157) (2020-10-27)

Judges' decisions in sport focus more on vigour than skill
Researchers from the University of Plymouth analysed almost 550 men's and women's mixed martial arts contests, using data collated for the Ultimate Fighting Championship, and found the rate at which competitors fight is more likely to result in judges awarding victory than the skill with which they attack their opponents. (2020-10-27)

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