Current Squid News and Events

Current Squid News and Events, Squid News Articles.
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What's the catch? Algal blooms influence fishing booms
The timing of phytoplankton blooms in the Red Sea could help determine next year's fish catch. (2021-02-10)

Squid-inspired robot swims with nature's most efficient marine animals
Scientists at the University of Southampton and University of Edinburgh have developed a flexible underwater robot that can propel itself through water in the same style as nature's most efficient swimmer - the Aurelia aurita jellyfish. (2021-01-20)

Resilience to climate change?
A recent study examined the effects of acidic water on octopuses, potentially bringing new insight into both how our activities impact the world around us, and the way that world is adapting in response. (2021-01-13)

First in nation treatment for chronic subdural hematoma at Los Robles Health System
Los Robles Health System is leading the way in neurovascular clinical trials. Interventional neurologist, Dr. Asif Taqi, is the principal investigator of the STEM Study, a landmark trial that can change the management of chronic subdural hematomas completely. Los Robles enrolled and treated the first patient in the nation into this trial. (2020-12-04)

Bacteria convince their squid host to create a less hostile work environment
Bacteria living symbiotically within the Hawaiian bobtail squid can direct the host squid to change its normal gene-expression program to make a more inviting home, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Hawai'i. (2020-11-18)

Squid jet propulsion can enhance design of underwater robots, vehicles
Squids use a form of jet propulsion that is not well understood, especially when it comes to their hydrodynamics under turbulent flow conditions. Discovering their secrets can help create new designs for bioinspired underwater robots, so researchers are exploring the fundamental mechanism. They describe their numerical study in Physics of Fluids; among their discoveries, they found that thrust production and efficiency are underestimated within laminar, or nonturbulent, flows. (2020-11-03)

Mathematical modeling of processes in neurons to assist the treatment of epilepsy and depression
Researchers study the effect of neural stimulation by ultrasonic waves and analyzing the influence of ultrasonic wave parameters on the excitation of electrical signals in the nerves. The obtained results have a great practical value for further studies related to the issues of human brain modeling. (2020-11-02)

Antarctica yields oldest fossils of giant birds with 21-foot wingspans
Some of the largest birds in history, called pelagornithids, arose a few million years after the mass extinction that killed off the dinosaurs and patrolled the oceans with giant wingspans for some 60 million years. A team of paleontologists has found two fossils -- each from individual pelagornithids with wingspans of 20 feet or more -- that show this gigantism arose at least 50 million years ago and lasted at least 10 million years. (2020-10-27)

Global 'BiteMap' reveals how marine food webs may change with climate
Where are small marine animals most vulnerable to getting eaten? In a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Oct. 26, scientists sketched the first global ''BiteMap'' showing where the ocean's mid-sized predators are most active. By fishing with dried squid baits called ''squid pops,'' they discovered rising temperatures can shape entire communities of predators and have potential impacts lower down the food web. (2020-10-26)

Immune protein orchestrates daily rhythm of squid-bacteria symbiotic relationship
New research led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa scientists revealed that, in the mutually beneficial relationship between with the Hawaiian bobtail squid and the luminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, an immune protein called ''macrophage migration inhibitory factor'' is the maestro of daily rhythms. (2020-10-19)

Sprat, mollusks and algae: What a diet of the future might look like
Rethinking what we eat is essential if we hope to nourish ourselves sustainably and mind the climate. One option is to seek out alternative food sources from the sea. All the way at the bottom, where algae, cephalopods and tiny fish thrive, according to a new study from UCPH researchers. (2020-10-06)

This 'squidbot' jets around and takes pics of coral and fish
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have built a squid-like robot that can swim untethered, propelling itself by generating jets of water. The robot carries its own power source inside its body. It can also carry a sensor, such as a camera, for underwater exploration. (2020-10-06)

How the Humboldt squid's genetic past and present can secure its future
Marine biologists studying the genetic structure of the Humboldt squid population found it is vulnerable to overfishing by fleets on its migration path. (2020-09-30)

Materials scientists learn how to make liquid crystal shape-shift
A new 3D-printing method will make it easier to manufacture and control the shape of soft robots, artificial muscles and wearable devices. Researchers at UC San Diego show that by controlling the printing temperature of liquid crystal elastomer, they can control the material's degree of stiffness and ability to contract--known as degree of actuation. What's more, they are able to change the stiffness of different areas in the same material by exposing it to heat. (2020-09-25)

A tiny instrument to measure the faintest magnetic fields
Physicists at the University of Basel have developed a minuscule instrument able to detect extremely faint magnetic fields. At the heart of the superconducting quantum interference device are two atomically thin layers of graphene, which the researchers combined with boron nitride. Instruments like this one have applications in areas such as medicine, besides being used to research new materials. (2020-09-07)

Ichthyosaur's last meal is evidence of triassic megapredation
Some 240 million years ago, a dolphin-like ichthyosaur ripped to pieces and swallowed another marine reptile only a little smaller than itself. Then it almost immediately died and was fossilized, preserving the first evidence of megapredation, or a large animal preying on another large animal. (2020-08-20)

Seafood study finds plastic in all samples
A study of five different seafoods has found traces of plastic in every sample tested. (2020-08-12)

How fish stocks will change in warming seas
New research out today highlights the future effects of climate change on important fish stocks for south-west UK fisheries. (2020-08-10)

Exact climate data from the past
Corals and cave carbonates can reveal the temperatures that prevailed at the Earth's surface at the time they formed. An international team of geoscientists led by Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany, has developed a new method that makes it possible to identify whether the composition of these deposits was exclusively controlled by temperature, or if the formation process itself exerted an additional control. The new method allows scientists to determine past Earth surface temperatures more reliably. (2020-08-10)

Fossil mystery solved: Super-long-necked reptiles lived in the ocean, not on land
By CT scanning crushed fossilized skulls and digitally reassembling them, and by examining the fossils' growth rings, scientists were able to describe a new species of prehistoric sea creature. Tanystropheus hydroides, named after mythology's hydra, was a twenty-foot-long animal with a ten-foot-long neck. (2020-08-06)

Long neck helped reptile hunt underwater
Its neck was three times as long as its torso, but had only 13 extremely elongated vertebrae: Tanystropheus, a bizarre giraffe-necked reptile which lived 242 million years ago, is a paleontological absurdity. A new study led by the University of Zurich has now shown that the creature lived in water and was surprisingly adaptable. (2020-08-06)

First gene knockout in a cephalopod is achieved at Marine Biological Laboratory
A team at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) has achieved the first gene knockout in a cephalopod using the squid Doryteuthis pealeii, an exceptionally important research organism in biology for nearly a century. The milestone study is reported in the July 30 issue of Current Biology. The team used CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to knock out a pigmentation gene in squid embryos, which eliminated pigmentation in the eye and in skin cells (chromatophores) with high efficiency. (2020-07-30)

Soft robot actuators heal themselves
Repeated activity wears on soft robotic actuators, but these machine's moving parts need to be reliable and easily fixed. Now a team of researchers has a biosynthetic polymer, patterned after squid ring teeth, that is self-healing and biodegradable, creating a material not only good for actuators, but also for hazmat suits and other applications where tiny holes could cause a danger. (2020-07-27)

Army project turns to nature for help with self-healing material
An Army-funded project developed a self-healing material patterned after squid ring teeth protein. The biodegradable biosynthetic polymer could be used to repair materials that are under continual repetitive movement such as robotic machines, prosthetic legs, ventilators and personal protective equipment like hazmat suits. (2020-07-27)

Atomtronic device could probe boundary between quantum, everyday worlds
A new device that relies on flowing clouds of ultracold atoms promises potential tests of the intersection between the weirdness of the quantum world and the familiarity of the macroscopic world we experience every day. (2020-07-17)

Wind beneath their wings: Albatrosses fine-tuned to wind conditions
A new study of albatrosses has found that wind plays a bigger role in their decision to take flight than previously thought, and due to their differences in body size, males and females differ in their response to wind. (2020-06-19)

Self-assembling, biomimetic composites possess unusual electrical properties
Sometimes, breaking rules is not a bad thing. Especially when the rules are apparent laws of nature that apply in bulk material, but other forces appear in the nanoscale. (2020-06-04)

The consequences of exploiting the ocean depths
A group of international experts has just published an article in the prestigious review Nature in which they suggest responses to question such as how organisms live in the Twilight zone and how diverse they are; which organic processes transform and consume the zone's organic material; and how the organic material is carried into and out of it (2020-06-01)

Squid studies illuminate neural dysfunction in ALS; suggest new route to therapy
Yuyu Song of Harvard Medical School was a Grass Fellow at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) when she took advantage of a powerful research organism in neuroscience, the local squid, to start asking how a mutant protein associated with familial ALS behaves under controlled conditions. Her study, recently published in eNeuro, clarifies the mechanisms underlying neural dysfunction in ALS, and also suggests a novel approach to restoring the health of motor neurons in patients with the disease. (2020-06-01)

There is no escaping from climate change, even in the deep sea
Even though the deeper layers of the ocean are warming at a slower pace than the surface, animals living in the deep ocean are more exposed to climate warming and will face increasing challenges to maintain their preferred thermal habitats in the future. (2020-05-25)

Researchers go cuckoo: Antarctic penguins release an extreme amount of laughing gas
In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have demonstrated that penguins in Antarctica emit copious amounts of nitrous oxide via their feces. So much so, that the researchers went ''cuckoo'' from being surrounded by penguin poop. (2020-05-19)

Fossil reveals evidence of 200-million-year-old 'squid' attack
Researchers say a fossil found on the Jurassic coast of southern England in the 19th century demonstrates the world's oldest known example of a squid-like creature attacking its prey. (2020-05-06)

HKUST researchers unlock genomic secrets of scaly-foot snail
Researchers from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have decoded for the first time the genome of Scaly-foot Snail, a rare snail inhabited in what scientists called 'the origin of life'- deep-sea hydrothermal vents characterized with impossible living condition. Unraveling the genome of this unique creature will not only shed light on how life evolved billions of years ago, but will also lay foundation for the discovery of potential remedies offered by these ancient creatures. (2020-04-28)

Surprising hearing talents in cormorants
The great cormorant has more sensitive hearing under water than in air. This new knowledge may help protect vulnerable bird species. (2020-04-01)

New genetic editing powers discovered in squid
Revealing yet another super-power in the skillful squid, scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory have discovered that squid massively edit their own genetic instructions not only within the nucleus of their neurons, but also within the axon -- the long, slender neural projections that transmit electrical impulses to other neurons. This is the first time that edits to genetic information have been observed outside of the nucleus of an animal cell (2020-03-23)

Stanford researcher investigates how squid communicate in the dark
Researchers begin to reveal how social squid communicate in the near-blackness of the deep sea. (2020-03-23)

Why organisms shrink
Everyone is talking about global warming. A team of paleontologists at GeoZentrum Nordbayern at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has recently investigated how prehistoric organisms reacted to climate change, basing their research on belemnites. These shrunk significantly when the water temperature rose as a result of volcanic activity approximately 183 million years ago, during the period known as the Toarcian. The FAU research team published their results in the online publication Royal Society Open Science. (2020-03-09)

Gene regulatory factors enable bacteria to kill rivals and establish symbiosis in a squid
Two factors that control the expression of a key gene required by luminescent bacteria to kill competing bacterial cells have been identified. (2020-03-06)

Cuttlefish eat less for lunch when they know there'll be shrimp for dinner
Cuttlefish can rapidly learn from experience and adapt their eating behavior accordingly, a new study has shown. (2020-02-04)

Squid brains approach that of dogs
We are closer to understanding the incredible ability of squid to instantly camouflage themselves thanks to research from The University of Queensland. Dr. Wen-Sung Chung and Professor Justin Marshall, from UQ's Queensland Brain Institute, completed the first MRI-based mapping of the squid brain in 50 years to develop an atlas of neural connections. (2020-01-28)

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