Current Squirrels News and Events

Current Squirrels News and Events, Squirrels News Articles.
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Eating omega-3 fat helps hibernating Arctic ground squirrels warm up during deep cold
By feeding arctic ground squirrels special diets, researchers have found that omega-3 fatty acids, common in flax seed and fish oil, help keep the animals warmer in deep hibernation. (2021-01-14)

Territorial red squirrels live longer when they're friendly with their neighbors
Researchers publishing December 17, 2020 in the journal Current Biology found that red squirrels in the Yukon have a greater chance of survival when living near neighbors. These fitness benefits depended on familiarity, or how long the same squirrels lived next to each other. These benefits were more pronounced in older squirrels, whom the data suggested could sharply offset the effects of aging by maintaining all of their neighbors from one year to the next. (2020-12-17)

Squirrels need good neighbours
Living beside familiar neighbours boosts a squirrel's chances of survival and successful breeding, new research shows. (2020-12-17)

Arctic ground squirrels recycle nutrients to endure deep hibernation
By studying the body chemistry of hibernating Arctic ground squirrels, researchers have found that the animals are able to recycle their body's own nutrients to survive during a long, inactive winter. A University of Alaska Fairbanks-led study monitored ground squirrels in a laboratory environment for two years, measuring the almost undetectable flow of nutrients through their hibernating bodies. Researchers found that the animals were able to convert the free nitrogen they were creating into amino acids. (2020-12-07)

Natural selection plays major role in an organism's capacity to evolve and adapt
It's widely assumed within the evolutionary biology field that weak selection provides an advantage to an organism's ability to evolve. But new research, published in the journal Science, may offer the first experimental proof that strong selection pressure enhances an organism's evolvability, by boosting robustness. (2020-12-03)

The keys to the squirrel's evolutionary success in the face of climate change have been identified
Squirrels form a diverse family of rodents. Nearly 300 species have been described, and they occur in every land environment on the planet, from tropical forests to hot and cold deserts. But why are there so many species? A study led by researchers from the Complutense University of Madrid and the Institute of Geosciences (UCM-CSIC) has examined the characteristics of squirrel species that contribute to their evolutionary success in the face of global climate change. (2020-11-25)

Shining a (UV) light on the glow-in-the-dark platypus
The fur of the platypus - an Australian species threatened with extinction - glows green under ultraviolet light, a new study finds. This is the first observation of biofluorescence in an egg-laying mammal (monotreme), suggesting this extraordinary trait may not be as rare as previously thought. (2020-10-29)

Dog training methods help JHU teach robots to learn new tricks
With a training technique commonly used to teach dogs to sit and stay, Johns Hopkins University computer scientists showed a robot how to teach itself several new tricks, including stacking blocks. With the method, the robot, named Spot, was able to learn in days what typically takes a month. (2020-10-26)

Wildlife flock to backyards for food from people
A new study helps explain why some animals are sometimes more often found in suburban areas than wild ones. (2020-10-26)

Study reveals element in blood is part of human--and hibernating squirrel--stress response
A new study published in the journal Critical Care Explorations shows for the first time that part of the stress response in people and animals involves increasing the levels of a naturally circulating element in blood. The discovery demonstrates a biological mechanism that rapidly responds to severe physiologic stress and potentially serves to protect us from further damage due to life-threatening conditions. (2020-10-01)

UBCO researchers concerned about prey and predator species in post-fire logging areas
New research from UBC Okanagan shows that salvage logging on land damaged by wildfires has negative impacts on a variety of animals. While post-fire salvage logging is used to mitigate economic losses following wildfire, Karen Hodges, a biology professor in the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science, says the compounded effects of wildfire and post-fire salvage logging are more severe than what wildlife experience from fire alone. (2020-09-22)

Snowshoe hare carcasses feed more then the usual suspects, study shows
What do lynx, flying squirrels, ravens, and wolverines have in common? They will all scavenge from snowshoe hare carcasses under the right conditions, according to a new study by University of Alberta ecologists. And they're not alone. In fact, researchers documented 24 different species feeding from snowshoe hare carcasses in Canada's northern boreal forest. (2020-08-13)

For rufous hummingbirds, migration looks different depending on age and sex
Plucky, beautiful and declining in numbers at about a 2% annual rate, the rufous hummingbird makes its long annual migration in different timing and route patterns based the birds' age and sex, new research by Oregon State University shows. (2020-07-28)

Red squirrels making comeback as return of pine marten spells bad news for invasive grey squirrel
The number of red squirrels is on the increase in Ireland thanks to the return of the pine marten, a native carnivore, a new survey led by NUI Galway has found. (2020-06-17)

Pine martens like to have neighbors -- but not too near
Pine martens need neighbors but like to keep their distance, according to new research. (2020-05-15)

New freeze-resistant trichinella species discovered in wolverines
A new freeze-resistant Trichinella species has been discovered in wolverines by Agricultural Research Service scientists and their colleagues. Trichinella are parasites that cause the disease trichinosis (formally referred to as trichinellosis), which people can get by eating raw or undercooked meat from infected animals. (2020-05-06)

Charismatic invasive species have an easier time settling into new habitats
An international study, in which the University of Cordoba participated, assessed the influence of charisma in the handling of invasive species and concluded that the perception people have of them can hinder our control over these species and condition their spread (2020-04-21)

Parasite carried by grey squirrels negatively impacts red squirrel behavior
Research published in the Journal of Animal Ecology reveals a new mechanism of how grey squirrels affect native red squirrels in Europe through parasite-mediated competition. (2020-04-16)

How gliding animals fine-tuned the rules of evolution
Since its inception in 1867, The American Naturalist has maintained its position as one of the world's premier peer-reviewed publications in ecology, evolution, and behavior research. Its goals are to publish articles that are of broad interest to the readership, pose new and significant problems, introduce novel subjects, develop conceptual unification, and change the way people think. AmNat emphasizes sophisticated methodologies and innovative theoretical syntheses--all in an effort to advance the knowledge of organic evolution and other broad biological principles. (2020-02-17)

Revving up the engine
Research using heart cells from squirrels, mice and people identifies an evolutionary mechanism critical for heart muscle function. (2020-01-27)

Strongly 'handed' squirrels less good at learning
Squirrels that strongly favour their left or right side are less good at learning, new research suggests. (2020-01-19)

'Like a video game with health points,' energy budgets explain evolutionary body size
Budgeting resources isn't just a problem for humans preparing a holiday dinner, or squirrels storing up nuts for the winter. A new model of how animals budget their energy sheds light on how they live and explains why they tend to evolve toward larger body sizes. The research, published in PNAS, proposes that animal energy budgets are governed by a key mechanism: resource variation -- a measure of how spread out or clumped up food and water are. (2019-12-18)

Leaving home is beneficial for male squirrels but not for females, study shows
In the world of squirrels, moving away from your home turf has better outcomes for males than for females, according to a new study by University of Alberta ecologists. (2019-12-13)

Northern Ireland's recovering pine marten population benefits red squirrels
The recovery of pine marten in Ireland and Britain is reversing native red squirrel replacement by invasive grey squirrels, according to new research presented at the British Ecological Society's annual meeting in Belfast today. (2019-12-12)

Squirrels listen in to birds' conversations as signal of safety
Grey squirrels eavesdrop on the chatter between nearby songbirds as a sign of safety, according to a paper by Marie Lilly and colleagues at Oberlin College in the United States, publishing Sept. 4, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. (2019-09-04)

Understanding the animal brain could help robots wash your dishes
CSHL neuroscientist Anthony Zador shows how evolution and animal brains can be a rich source of inspiration for machine learning, especially to help AI tackle some enormously difficult problems, like doing the dishes. (2019-08-21)

Interbreeding turned grey squirrels black -- study
Research published in the journal BMC Evolutionary Biology has shed new light on why some grey squirrels are black. (2019-08-13)

'Mega-fires' may be too extreme even for a bird that loves fire
Fire is a natural part of western forests, but the changing nature of fire in many parts of North America may pose challenges for birds. One bird in particular, the Black-backed Woodpecker, specializes in using recently-burned forests in western North America, but new research suggests that these birds actually prefer to nest near the edges of burned patches -- and these edges are getting harder to find as wildfires have become bigger and more severe. (2019-08-06)

New species of flying squirrel from Southwest China added to the rarest and 'most wanted'
Described in 1981, the genus Biswamoyopterus is regarded as the most mysterious and rarest amongst all flying squirrels. It comprises two species, each known from a single specimen. Recent research by Chinese and Australian scientists described a third species found to inhabit low-altitude forests in Yunnan Province, China. By publishing their discovery in the open-access journal ZooKeys, the research team aims to promote further study and conservation of these squirrels. (2019-07-18)

Highway medians are a source of food for wildlife, study shows
Vegetated highway medians are a proverbial buffet for small mammals, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. Animals such as weasels, mink, and chipmunks use the roadside bands of vegetation as habitat to find food. (2019-07-08)

Study: Internet perpetuates job market inequality
Recent research finds the internet is giving employers and job seekers access to more information, but has not made the hiring process more meritocratic. Instead, lower-wage jobs have become 'black holes,' with intense competition for positions, while many higher-wage jobs are going to targeted candidates and are open to only limited competition. (2019-06-26)

New Jurassic non-avian theropod dinosaur sheds light on origin of flight in Dinosauria
A new Jurassic non-avian theropod dinosaur from 163-million-year-old fossil deposits in northeastern China provides new information regarding the incredible richness of evolutionary experimentation that characterized the origin of flight in the Dinosauria. (2019-05-08)

Hold the mustard: What makes spiders fussy eaters
It might be one of nature's most agile and calculating hunters, but the wolf spider won't harm an insect that literally leaves a bad taste in its mouth, according to new research by a team of Wake Forest University sensory neuroscientists, including C.J. Saunders. (2019-04-15)

Food for thought: Why did we ever start farming?
In UConn researcher Elic Weitzel's recent publication, he hopes to shed light on the question regarding the adaptation farming in early populations in the Eastern United States. (2019-04-02)

In the squirrel world, prime real estate is determined by previous owner, study reveals
Researchers found that if a squirrel inherits territory from a male rather than a female, it will have about 1,300 more cones in its midden. This stored energy will keep the squirrel alive an extra 17 days. For females it means she will enough food to breed earlier, resulting in her offspring leaving the nest earlier. This shows how the behavior of a complete stranger can impact the genetic contribution of another. (2019-02-13)

Think Pink: Texas A&M student aids in discovery of fluorescent pink flying squirrel
Texas A&M graduate student aids in the discovery of flying squirrels fluorescing pink in UV light. (2019-02-04)

Camera trap study reveals the hidden lives of island carnivores
Researchers placed 160 cameras on 19 of the 22 Apostle Islands in northern Wisconsin to see which carnivores were living there. After taking more than 200,000 photos over a period of three years, the team discovered that several carnivores are living on various islands in this remote archipelago in Lake Superior. (2018-12-21)

Giant flying squirrel fossil from a Barcelona landfill clarifies the squirrel family tree
A study just published in eLife shows a fossil found in a Barcelona landfill to be about 11.6 million years old -- making the Miopetaurista neogrivensis specimen the oldest-known giant flying squirrel discovered. (2018-10-24)

Oldest fossil of a flying squirrel sheds new light on its evolutionary tree
The oldest flying squirrel fossil ever found has unearthed new insight on the origin and evolution of these airborne animals. (2018-10-09)

Two new truffle species discovered in Florida pecan orchards
Two new species of truffles were recently discovered on the roots of pecan trees in Florida orchards. The good news is that you can eat them - the bad news is that you wouldn't want to. (2018-08-23)

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