Current Standards News and Events

Current Standards News and Events, Standards News Articles.
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Army researchers expand study of ethics, artificial intelligence
The Army of the future will involve humans and autonomous machines working together to accomplish the mission. According to Army researchers, this vision will only succeed if artificial intelligence is perceived to be ethical. (2021-02-16)

A benchmark for single-electron circuits
Manipulating individual electrons with the goal of employing quantum effects offers new possibilities in electronics. In order to gain new insights into the physical origin and into metrological aspects of the small, but inevitable fundamental uncertainties governed by the rules of quantum mechanics, scientists from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt(PTB) and the University of Latvia have collaborated to develop a statistical testing methodology. Their results have been published in the journal Nature Communications. (2021-01-26)

North Carolina simplifies medicaid enrollment, improves coverage for pregnant women
North Carolina did not expand Medicaid eligibility under the ACA, which continued to put many low-income women at risk for losing health care coverage post partum. The state did comply with ACA standards for simplifying Medicaid enrollment. By automating the process and removing a stringent and often cumbersome financial assessment process, more low-income women qualified for full Medicaid and reduced the number of women who instead qualified for more limited benefits under the state's Medicaid for Pregnant Women program. (2021-01-12)

How effective are educational support programs for children with cancer?
As children undergo treatment for cancer, they may miss school and risk falling behind in their education. An analysis published in Pyscho-Oncology has examined the educational support programs provided to children with cancer. (2021-01-06)

Estonian-led international network publishes first study of growing influence of social media
The Global Digital Human Rights Network has published a study on the growing role of social media in the processing of information and the fight against misinformation related to COVID-19. (2020-12-23)

New guidelines for treating the complications of brain tumours
Experts from the leading oncology societies ESMO (European Society for Medical Oncology) and EANO (European Association of Neuro-Oncology) hav now compiled international guidelines and standards for the treatment of complications of brain tumours (2020-12-09)

Research finds that UK consumers dislike hormones in beef and chlorine washed chicken
New reveals the extent to which UK consumers dislike food produced using production methods such as hormones in beef and chlorine washed chicken. The research also reveals that UK consumers highly value food production that adheres to food safety standards set by the EU as well as UK produced food. This is particularly relevant for post-Brexit trade deals and the ongoing debates about UK food standards. (2020-11-12)

High social and ecological standards for chocolate
Worldwide demand for food from the tropics that meets higher environmental and social standards has risen sharply in recent years. Consumers often have to make ethically questionable decisions: products may be available through child labour, starvation wages or environmental destruction. Building on an interdisciplinary project in Peru, an international research team including Göttingen Univeristy published an overview on the transition to responsible, high-quality cocoa production. This 'Perspective' article appeared in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution. (2020-10-19)

IVF success rates higher at clinics that provide more outcomes data
Success rates for in vitro fertilization are higher at clinics that voluntarily share more information than required by government regulators, according to new research by faculty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. In a review of data reported between 2014 and 2017, CU researchers found that clinics that reported more data than required by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had higher rates of success in achieving pregnancy and birth. (2020-10-18)

Climate change undermines the safety of buildings and infrastructure in Europe
The higher temperatures expected over the next 50 years in Europe will accelerate corrosion of buildings, and will expose infrastructure to higher stresses, thus undermining the safety of constructions. CMCC researchers and members of the scientific network established by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission, co-authored two studies, suggesting a review of the EU standards for structural design. (2020-10-14)

Port engineers need guidance incorporating sea level rise into construction designs
A survey of maritime infrastructure engineers by University of Rhode Island researchers found that the rising sea level is often not factored into designs of ports, breakwaters, fishing piers and other coastal infrastructure. (2020-10-13)

The valuation of a company's investment properties may bring surprises
In addition to the financial statements and balance sheet, an investor should also go through the notes and understand their content. For example, the valuation of a company's investment properties in the financial statements may bring surprises depending on whether the company has performed the valuation itself or used an external party for it. (2020-10-12)

Battery fires: Industry and research must work together for safer batteries
Fire safety issues with lithium-ion batteries could be addressed with better collaboration across sectors, Imperial College London experts have said. (2020-09-23)

Comprehensive look at US fuel economy standards show big savings on fuel and emissions
In one of the first comprehensive assessments of the fuel economy standards in the US, researchers found that, over their 40-year history, the standards helped reduce reliance on foreign oil producers, saved $5 trillion in fuel costs and prevented 14 billion metric tons of carbon from being released into the atmosphere. The standards (known as CAFE standards), first enacted to reduce foreign oil dependence, were cost-effective, fair, durable and adaptive, the researchers found. (2020-09-03)

ITMO University scientists develop a tool for wireless charging of multiple devices
When we need to borrow a charger for our device, we often face the fact that different manufacturers produce different charger connectors. Wireless charging isn't a solution either: companies use different power transfer systems that work at different frequencies. One of the research teams based at ITMO University's Department of Physics and Engineering is engaged in this problem and has made a significant progress (2020-08-26)

New way to check the quality of nanomaterials like graphene
A new way to check the quality of nanomaterials like graphene has emerged from a team at the University of Sussex. (2020-08-12)

Inconsistent EPA regulations increase lead poisoning risk to kids, study finds
As new lead protection rules from the Environmental Protection Agency move toward finalization, research shows that tens of thousands of children are at increased risk under the current set of inconsistent standards. (2020-08-06)

For-profit long-term care homes have COVID-19 outbreaks with more cases, deaths
For-profit status is associated with the extent of an outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in long-term care (LTC) homes and the number of resident deaths from COVID-19, but not the likelihood of an outbreak, which was related to the infection rate in the surrounding local public health unit and the total number of beds in the home, found new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) https://www.cmaj.ca/content/early/2020/07/22/cmaj.201197.1. (2020-07-22)

Corporate social responsibility practices often lack 'on the ground' change -- SFU research
Companies that practice corporate social responsibility (CSR) could ensure more positive outcomes by tackling ''real change on the ground'' rather than focusing on single projects and budgets, according to Simon Fraser University political science professor Andy Hira. (2020-07-22)

More evidence of causal link between air pollution and early death
Strengthening U.S. air quality standards for fine particulate pollution to be in compliance with current World Health Association (WHO) guidelines could save more than 140,000 lives over the course of a decade, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (2020-06-26)

Study finds strong evidence for a causal link between long-term exposure to fine air particles and greater mortality in elderly Americans
A new analysis of 16 years of publicly accessible health data on 68.5 million Medicare enrollees provides broad evidence that long-term exposure to fine particles in the air - even at levels below current EPA standards - leads to increased mortality rates among the elderly. Based on the results of five (2020-06-26)

Old drug standards delay new drug approvals
The more information the FDA has about existing drugs, the longer it takes to OK new ones for the same conditions. (2020-06-19)

NJIT researchers develop easier and faster way to quantify, explore therapeutic proteins
Researchers at New Jersey Institute of Technology in collaboration with Ohio University and Merck & Co. Inc. recently developed a new efficient method for targeted protein analysis -- one they say could speed up processes for disease testing, drug discovery and vaccine development. (2020-06-17)

Study finds 82 percent of avocado oil rancid or mixed with other oils
The country's first extensive study of commercial avocado oil quality and purity finds the vast majority of avocado oil sold in the U.S. is of poor quality, mislabeled or adulterated with other oils. (2020-06-17)

Better patient identification could help fight the coronavirus
In a peer-reviewed commentary published in npj Digital Medicine, experts from Regenstrief Institute, Mayo Clinic and The Pew Charitable Trusts write that matching patient records from disparate sources is not only achievable, but fundamental to stem the tide of the current pandemic and allow for fast action for future highly contagious viruses. (2020-06-02)

SCAI issues position statement on the performance of percutaneous coronary intervention in ambulatory surgical centers
The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) today issued a position statement on the performance of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs). The document was published in SCAI's official journal, Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions. (2020-05-14)

Crises are no excuse for lowering scientific standards, say ethicists
Ethicists from Carnegie Mellon and McGill universities are calling on the global research community to resist treating the urgency of the current COVID-19 outbreak as grounds for making exceptions to rigorous research standards in pursuit of treatments and vaccines. (2020-04-23)

Avoid making exceptions for research quality during COVID-19 pandemic
Global crises are no excuse for lowering scientific standards, argue Alex London and Jonathan Kimmelman in a Policy Forum. (2020-04-23)

Poor coastal hypoxia and acidification policy leaves marine fisheries at risk
Current regulatory standards regarding the dissolved oxygen and pH levels of coastal waters have not kept pace with the scientific understanding of hypoxia and acidification, nor with the mounting evidence of their negative impact on coastal marine life. (2020-04-23)

Major new study charts course to net zero industrial emissions
A major new study by an interdisciplinary team of researchers finds that it is possible -- and critical -- to bring industrial greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2070. Published Sunday in Applied Energy, the study assesses the range of technologies and policies interventions available to enable global industry decarbonization. This paper was the result of a collaboration among almost two dozen leading technical experts, led by Jeffrey Rissman of Energy Innovation and coauthored by Resources for the Future (RFF) Senior Fellow Dallas Burtraw. (2020-04-01)

Scientists seek to establish community-driven metadata standards for microbiomes research
As the collective body of microbiome data for diverse crops grows, the lack of consistency in recording data makes it harder for the data to be utilized across research projects. In a recent article published in Phytobiomes Journal, Dundore-Arias and others in his field discuss the need for agriculture-specific metadata standards for microbiome research. (2020-03-25)

Concerns over 'exaggerated' study claims of AI outperforming doctors
Many studies claiming that artificial intelligence is as good as (or better than) human experts at interpreting medical images are of poor quality and are arguably exaggerated, posing a risk for the safety of 'millions of patients' warn researchers in The BMJ today. (2020-03-25)

Corporate social irresponsibility: Which cases are critically reported -- and which aren't?
A new study on media reports about corporate misconduct in five countries shows that reporting or no reporting often depends on interests of the media companies. (2020-03-12)

Daily exposure to ozone pollution linked to increased risk of death
Daily exposure to ground level ozone in cities worldwide is associated with an increased risk of death, finds the largest study of its kind published by The BMJ today. (2020-02-10)

Measuring the world of social phenomena
Economists working with Professor Marko Sarstedt from University of Magdeburg are demanding that the same scientific standards be applied to economics and the behavioral sciences in general as are used in the natural sciences. (2020-01-20)

Healthier school meals are evidence of the success of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act
In this editorial, concerns used to support the rollbacks of nutrition standards set forth in the 2010 Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act are analyzed, with researchers finding not only that these concerns are not supported by evidence, but also that the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act had notable positive effects on the dietary quality of meals served to school-aged children. (2020-01-14)

CLICS: World's largest database of cross-linguistic lexical associations
A team of scientists, led by scholars from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, has published a new version of the Database of Cross-Linguistic Colexifications (CLICS), covering lexical associations in more than 3,100 languages varieties. The new version of the database offers lexical data on an unprecedented scale and provides a detailed, reproducible workflow for data aggregation, allowing scholars from all over the world to contribute to future versions. (2020-01-13)

NIST study suggests universal method for measuring light power
The proposed definition promises a more precise, less expensive and more portable method for measuring this important quantity for science, technology, manufacturing, commerce and national defense. (2019-12-20)

Counting photons is now routine enough to need standards
NIST has taken a step toward enabling universal standards for single-photon detectors (SPDs), which are becoming increasingly important in science and industry. (2019-12-20)

Concerns over regulation of oral powders or gels sold as medical devices in Europe
Oral powders or gels, sold as medical devices in the European Union (EU), aren't regulated to the same safety standards as those applied to medicines, reveals research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. (2019-12-03)

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