Current Staphylococcus Aureus News and Events

Current Staphylococcus Aureus News and Events, Staphylococcus Aureus News Articles.
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Last-itch effort: Fighting the bacteria that exacerbate eczema with bacteria
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine use bacteriotherapy to improve symptoms of atopic dermatitis. (2021-02-22)

Direct cloning method CAPTUREs novel microbial natural products
Microorganisms possess natural product biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) that may harbor unique bioactivities for use in drug development and agricultural applications. However, many uncharacterized microbial BGCs remain inaccessible. Researchers at Illinois previously demonstrated a technique using transcription factor decoys to activate large, silent BGCs in bacteria to aid in natural product discovery. (2021-02-19)

Researchers demonstrate self-sterilizing polymers work against SARS-CoV-2
Researchers have demonstrated a family of self-sterilizing polymers that are effective at inactivating coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2 - the virus that causes COVID-19. The work opens the door to a suite of applications that could help to reduce the transmission of COVID-19 and other diseases. (2021-02-15)

New weapon against resistant bacteria
Researchers have developed a new antibiotic that can help in the fight against resistant bacteria, and they hope it will reach the patients. (2021-02-10)

Livestock workers face high MRSA risk
For Michigan State University's Felicia Wu, the surprise isn't that people who work with livestock are at higher risk of picking up antibiotic-resistant bacteria, but instead how much higher their risk levels are. (2021-01-28)

At-home swabs diagnose infections as accurately as healthcare worker-collected swabs
Self swabs and caregiver swabs are effective at detecting multiple pathogens and are just as accurate as those taken by healthcare workers, according to a team of Australian researchers. The research appears in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology. (2021-01-28)

Iron-carrying extracellular vesicles are key to respiratory viral-bacterial co-infection
The vesicles associate with bacterial cells and supply them with essential nutrients, promoting the growth of expansive bacterial communities. (2021-01-26)

Hope for a vaccination against Staphylococcus areus infections?
Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) ranks among the globally most important causes of infections in humans and is considered a dreaded hospital pathogen. Active and passive immunisation against multi-resistant strains is seen as a potentially valuable alternative to antibiotic therapy. However, all vaccine candidates so far have been clinically unsuccessful. With an epitope-based immunisation, scientists at Cologne University Hospital and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) have now described a new vaccination strategy against S. aureus in the Nature Partner Journal NPJ VACCINES. (2021-01-20)

Research establishes antibiotic potential for cannabis molecule
The main nonpsychoactive component of cannabis has been shown to kill the bacteria responsible for gonorrhoea, meningitis and legionnaires disease, which could lead to the first new class of antibiotics for resistant bacteria in 60 years. (2021-01-19)

Evolution in a test tube: these bacteria survive on deadly copper surfaces
The descendants of regular wild-type bacteria can evolve to survive for a long time on metallic copper surfaces that would usually kill them within a few minutes. An international research team led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Bundeswehr Institute of Microbiology was able to produce these tiny survivalists in the lab and has been able to study them more closely. The team reports on its findings in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. (2021-01-13)

Gene-editing produces tenfold increase in superbug slaying antibiotics
Scientists have used gene-editing advances to achieve a tenfold increase in the production of super-bug targeting formicamycin antibiotics. (2021-01-12)

Discovery pinpoints new therapeutic target for atopic dermatitis
Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have discovered a key mechanism underlying bacterial skin colonisation in atopic dermatitis, which affects millions around the globe. By identifying a major mechanism through which Staphylococcus aureus binds to the skin of patients with AD the team has opened the possibility of targeting this pathway as a therapeutic option in AD. (2021-01-11)

Scientists turned toxic pesticide into treatment against antibiotic-resistant bacteria
Russian scientists from Kaliningrad and St. Petersburg have synthesized nitrogen-containing cyclic compounds that differ only in the relative position of side substituents. They are analogs of pesticides which are toxic and carcinogenic to humans, but the modifications allowed turning them into a powerful weapon against bacteria resistant to most antibiotics. (2020-12-29)

How does pathogen sense environment? Scientists identify key proteins' structures
Recently, a team led by Prof. TAO Yuyong from the School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in cooperation with Hefei National Laboratory for Physics Sciences at the Microscale, revealed the signal transduction mystery inside S. aureus, using a comprehensive application of biochemical and structural biology research methods. The study was published online in PNAS. (2020-12-15)

Chemists from RUDN University synthesized chitin-based antibiotics
?hemists from RUDN University discovered previously unknown derivatives of chitin, a biopolymer that forms the exoskeletons of insects and carapaces of crayfish and other arthropods. The new compounds and their nanoparticles have antibacterial properties and are able to catalyze chemical reactions. (2020-12-14)

Lyme disease ticks produce antibiotic that protects them from human skin bacteria
Ticks live dangerous lives, spending most of their time questing for a host across wildly different habitats and seasons. Once they encounter a reptile, bird, or a mammal like us, they become intimately connected with it -- and all of its bacteria and viruses -- for days on end. Though ticks are notorious for transmitting pathogens such as the Lyme disease bacterium, how does their immune system keep them safe from contracting pathogens themselves? (2020-12-10)

Let the sunshine in: self-cleaning membrane under visible light treatment
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) reported that the research team led by Dr. Jeehye Byun and Director Seok Won Hong from Water Cycle Research Center developed a membrane material that self-cleans biological contaminants through irradiation of sunlight. According to the team, the newly developed membrane material is expected to significantly reduce the cost of membrane management as the membrane can be reused after just 10 minutes of sunlight irradiation. (2020-12-09)

RUDN University biologist: Fern leaves improve immunity and support growth in carps
According to a biologist from RUDN University, fern leaves powder has a positive effect on the immune system, antimicrobial activity, and growth of carps. Based on this data, fish farms can breed big and healthy fish without using any chemical additives. (2020-12-07)

Understanding lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis
For young people with cystic fibrosis, lung infection with Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, is common and is treated with antibiotics in the hope that this will prevent a decline in lung function. However there has recently been debate over the role S. aureus plays in CF lung disease. Researchers from the University of Warwick have used a new model of CF lungs which could be used to make better decisions about future use of antibiotics. (2020-11-19)

Scientists discover secret to superbug's virulence in diabetic infections
The bodies of people with uncontrolled diabetes appear to be the perfect environment for a common type of superbug to thrive unchecked and do its worst damage, according to new research reported today in Science Advances. Staphylococcus aureus -- a bacteria that is often resistant to antibiotics -- thrives in glucose-rich diabetic conditions, which trigger it to activate some of its most virulent features. A lack of insulin prevents the immune system from responding to the infection. (2020-11-13)

Review of plants' role in antibacterial activity clears new paths for drug discovery
Chemical Reviews published the work by researchers at Emory University, which includes 459 plant natural products that met rigorous criteria for demonstrating antibacterial activity. The review is also deposited on the Shared Platform for Antibiotic Research and Knowledge (SPARK), sponsored by Pew Charitable Trusts. (2020-11-11)

Hospital floors are hotspot for bacteria, creating route of transfer to patients
The floors of hospital rooms are frequently contaminated with antibiotic-resistant bacteria within hours of patient admission, creating a route of transfer of potentially dangerous organisms to patients, according to a study published today as part of the proceedings from Decennial 2020: The Sixth International Conference on Healthcare-Associated Infections. Decennial 2020, an initiative of the CDC and SHEA, was cancelled in March due to the pandemic. (2020-10-30)

Learning the language of sugars
We're told not to eat too much sugar, but in reality, all of our cells are covered in sugar molecules called glycans. Glycans regulate many important processes including infection by bacteria and viruses, but little is known about them because their structures are highly complex. A team from the Wyss Institute has created a new suite of deep learning and bioinformatics tools that enable the comprehensive study of glycan sequences, providing insights into their functions and improving our understanding of infectious diseases. (2020-10-28)

New York City's coronavirus outbreak spread from more European sources than first reported
The COVID-19 pandemic started earlier than previously thought in New York City and Long Island by dozens of people infected mostly with strains from Europe. A new analysis also shows that most of the spread was within the community, as opposed to coming from people who had traveled. (2020-10-26)

Bacterial toxin with healing effect
A bacterial toxin promoting tissue healing has been discovered by an international research team led by scientists from University of Jena (Germany). The compound α-Hemolysine found in Staphylococcus aureus does not just damage cells, but also stimulates tissue regeneration. (2020-10-13)

Penn Medicine scientists engineer bacteria-killing molecules from wasp venom
A team led by scientists in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has engineered powerful new antimicrobial molecules from toxic proteins found in wasp venom. The team hopes to develop the molecules into new bacteria-killing drugs, an important advancement considering increasing numbers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. (2020-10-12)

Coupling antibiotics with stem cells to fight off bone infections
Researchers from Kanazawa University investigated the effects of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) loaded with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin on osteomyelitis caused by implants. By administering ADSC-loaded ciprofloxacin to the site of bone infection in rats, the researchers found a significant improvement of the infection, as shown by reduced soft tissue swelling, abscess formation, and bone degradation. These findings suggest a potential new therapy for implant-related bone infections that have traditionally been difficult to treat with antibiotics. (2020-10-01)

A single-application treatment for ear infections that doesn't need refrigeration
Outer ear infections, which affect millions of people each year, are typically caused by the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus. Repeatedly administering antibiotic drops, the standard treatment, can be a problem for some people, and the only single-use suspension currently available needs to be kept and handled cold. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering have developed a single-use treatment that doesn't require refrigeration. (2020-09-30)

Customizable synthetic antibiotic outmaneuvers resistant bacteria
Antibiotic resistance is one of the world's most urgent public health threats. In the United States alone, tens of thousands of deaths result each year from drug-resistant strains of common bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecium, which can cause virtually untreatable hospital-acquired infections. Perilously few new classes of antibiotics are being developed to fight infections that have become resistant to traditional treatments, and bringing any new drugs to market could take decades. (2020-09-23)

Why do hospital germs bind more strongly to certain surfaces than to others?
Multiresistant bacteria are a serious problem in hospital and healthcare environments. By forming a biofilm, these pathogens can colonize door handles and light switches and their presence on medical implants can lead to serious cases of post-operative infection. A team of physicists at Saarland University has now shown why hospital germs adhere strongly to surfaces from which water simply rolls off, but bind so poorly to surfaces that are easily wetted by water. (2020-09-16)

Guidance balances staph infection prevention in critically ill infants with family contact
NICUs should balance prevention of Staph infections in critically ill infants with the need for skin-to-skin contact with parents and siblings, according to a Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America white paper published in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. The paper serves as a clinical companion to the new recommendations from the CDC's Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee to help clinicians in NICUs make decisions about infection prevention, detection, and control practices. (2020-09-14)

Study finds babies born in fall at higher risk for allergic diseases
Researchers at National Jewish Health have determined that many allergic conditions likely start with dry, cracked skin, which leads to a chain reaction of allergic diseases known as the atopic march. It begins in infancy with atopic dermatitis and leads to food allergies, asthma and hay fever. Their latest study in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice reveals that the time of year a baby is born may be a risk factor. (2020-09-09)

Allergic immune responses help fight bacterial infections
Researchers from CeMM, MedUni Vienna and Stanford University, have found that a module of the immune system, best known for causing allergic reactions, plays a key role in acquiring host defense against infections triggered by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. This allergy module, constituted by mast cells and Immunoglobulin E, can grant protection and increased resistance against secondary bacterial infections in the body. These findings published in Immunity indicate a beneficial function for allergic immune responses. (2020-09-09)

Probiotic skin therapy improves eczema in children, NIH study suggests
An experimental treatment for eczema that aims to modify the skin microbiome safely reduced disease severity and increased quality of life for children as young as 3 years of age, a National Institutes of Health study has found. These improvements persisted for up to eight months after treatment stopped, researchers report in Science Translational Medicine. (2020-09-09)

How to spot patients most likely to die from blood infections
Unprecedented analysis of proteins and metabolites in patient serum provides new biomarkers associated with a patient's risk of dying from Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. (2020-09-03)

Dartmouth-led team engineers new treatment for drug-resistant bacterial infections
A new antibacterial agent that has been engineered by researchers at Dartmouth to essentially hide from the human immune system may treat life-threatening MRSA infections. A new paper, published today in Science Advances, provides details on the agent, which is the first lysin-based treatment with the potential to be used multiple times on a single patient, making it ideal to treat particularly persistent drug-resistant and drug-sensitive infections. (2020-09-02)

Vaccine that harnesses antifungal immunity protects mice from staph infection
Immunization of mice with a new vaccine consisting of fungal particles loaded with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) proteins protects mice against S. aureus infection, according to a study published August 20 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by David Underhill of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, and colleague. (2020-08-20)

Oxygen therapy harms lung microbiome in mice
A new mouse study hints that oxygen therapy may have unintended consequences via an unexpected source--the microbiome. (2020-08-12)

Cold-sensitive staphylococci reveal a weakness
A team from the University of Geneva has identified a new mechanism involved in the membrane synthesis of Staphylococcus aureus. When disrupted, this mechanism makes the pathogen sensitive to cold. The discovery of this physiological process could contribute to the fight against this pathogen that is difficult to treat due to its resistance to antibiotics (2020-08-03)

'Good' virus for common infection
Australian researchers have shown how viruses can be used to save lives, developing the potential use of bacteriophages in bandages to treat life-threatening golden staph infections which may not respond to traditional antibiotics. Targeting multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ('golden staph') in diabetic foot ulcers, Flinders University microbiology researchers have joined infectious diseases and pharmaceutical partners to show the usefulness of a possible 'phage cocktail' therapy on wound infections. (2020-07-29)

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