Current Starfish News and Events

Current Starfish News and Events, Starfish News Articles.
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Cells use concentration gradients as a compass
Biophysicists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munch have developed a new theory, which accounts for the observation that cells can perceive their own shapes, and use this information to direct the distribution of proteins inside the cell. (2021-02-16)

Ophiura from Russky Island might make photodynamic therapy more affordable
An unusual biologically active porphyrin compound was isolated from seabed dweller Ophiura sarsii. The substance might be used as an affordable light-sensitive drug for innovative photodynamic therapy and for targeted treatment of triple-negative breast cancer and some other cancers. Researchers from the School of Biomedicine of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and the University of Geneva reported the findings in Marine Drugs. (2021-02-08)

New starfish-like fossil reveals evolution in action
Researchers from the University of Cambridge have discovered a fossil of the earliest starfish-like animal, which helps us understand the origins of the nimble-armed creature. (2021-01-20)

In changing oceans, sea stars may be 'drowning'
New Cornell University-led research suggests that starfish, victims of sea star wasting disease (SSWD), may actually be in respiratory distress - literally 'drowning' in their own environment - as elevated microbial activity derived from nearby organic matter and warm ocean temperatures rob the creatures of their ability to breathe. (2021-01-06)

More frequent and extreme marine heatwaves likely to threaten starfish
Common starfish cannot survive amplified marine heatwaves projected at the end of the century and experience lasting negative effects from current heatwaves, according to new research being presented on at the British Ecological Society's Festival of Ecology. (2020-12-14)

Crown-of-thorns eat themselves out of house and home
A world-first study on the Great Barrier Reef shows crown-of-thorns starfish have the ability to find their own way home -- a behavior previously undocumented--but only if their neighborhood is stocked with their favorite food: corals. The starfish will consume available Acropora and ultimately eat themselves out of house and home before dispersing in search of new feeding grounds. (2020-11-03)

People can do more than use less plastic to help save the GBR: QUT research
There are many threats to Australia's Great Barrier Reef - cyclones, shipping, crown-of-thorns starfish - but QUT researchers say climate change is its worst enemy. Yet a survey they conducted found most people don't make a connection between climate change and reef health. They say there is more individuals could do on this front, both in the home and to influence government policies (2020-10-12)

Sea star's ability to clone itself may empower this mystery globetrotter
The identity of wild cloning sea star larvae has been a mystery since they were first documented in the Caribbean. The most commonly collected cloning species was thought to belong to the Oreasteridae, on the basis of similarity with sequences from Oreaster reticulatus and Oreaster clavatus. (2020-10-12)

Future ocean conditions could cause significant physical changes in marine mussels
Scientists from the University of Plymouth showed increased temperature and acidification of our oceans over the next century could have a range of effects on an economically important marine species (2020-10-09)

'Wrong-way' migrations stop shellfish from escaping ocean warming
Ocean warming is paradoxically driving bottom-dwelling invertebrates -- including sea scallops, blue mussels, surfclams and quahogs that are valuable to the shellfish industry -- into warmer waters and threatening their survival, a Rutgers-led study shows. (2020-09-07)

New test can detect crown-of-thorns starfish as quickly as a home pregnancy kit
Researchers at the Australian Institute of Marine Science have developed a dipstick test that can detect crown-of-thorns starfish on coral reefs by using the same technology as home pregnancy tests. (2020-09-03)

Uncovering the hidden life of 'dead' coral reefs
'Dead' coral rubble can support more animals than live coral, according to University of Queensland researchers trialling a high-tech sampling method. UQ's Dr Kenny Wolfe said that reef rubble habitat was often overlooked as desolate, unattractive and 'dead', however reef rubble was very much alive. (2020-08-31)

New species of Cretaceous brittle star named in honour of Nightwish vocalist
Palaeontologists have discovered a previously unknown species of brittle star that lived in the shallow, warm sea which covered parts of the present-day Netherlands at the end of the Dinosaur Era. The starfish-like creature was unearthed more than 20 years ago but has only now been identified as new to science. The name of the new fossil pays tribute to Dutch metal vocalist Floor Jansen, in recognition of the mutual inspiration between science and music. (2020-08-24)

Crown-of-thorns enhance their growth by switching diets early
When juvenile crown-of-thorns starfish switch their diets from coralline algae to corals early after settlement, they exhibit enhanced growth rates for longer and will ultimately get much bigger. (2020-07-21)

Eating habits of baby predator starfish revealed
The varied diet of juvenile crown-of-thorns starfish complicates scientists' ability to age them. This makes plans for the management of this invasive species more difficult, as outbreaks of adults on the reef are unpredictable. (2020-07-20)

Tackling coral reefs' thorny problem
Researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have revealed the evolutionary history of the crown-of-thorns starfish -- a predator of coral that can devastate coral reefs. Their findings shed light on how the populations of these starfish have changed over time and could potentially help reduce their ecological destruction. (2020-07-08)

The state of coral reefs in the Solomon Islands
The ''Global Reef Expedition: Solomon Islands Final Report'' summarizes the foundation's findings from a monumental research mission to study corals and reef fish in the Solomon Islands and provides recommendations on how to preserve these precious ecosystems into the future. (2020-06-29)

New compounds from starfish of Kuril basin show efficacy against cancer cells.
Russian scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), G. B. Elyakov Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (PIBOC FEB RAS), and A.V. Zhirmunsky National Scientific Center for Marine Biology (NSCMB FEB RAS) have discovered four new steroid substances which target cells of human breast cancer, and colorectal carcinoma. They were extracted from the starfish Ceramaster patagonicus, a Kuril basin seabed dweller. A related article appears in Marine Drugs. (2020-06-26)

Arctic Ocean acidification worse than previously expected
Arctic Ocean acidification worse than previously expected. (2020-06-17)

Fish feces reveals which species eat crown-of-thorns
Crown-of-thorns starfish are on the menu for many more fish species than previously suspected, an investigation using fish poo and gut goo reveals. (2020-05-18)

New study shines light on mysterious giant viruses
In recent years, giant viruses have been unearthed in several of the world's most mysterious locations, from the thawing permafrost of Siberia to locations unknown beneath the Antarctic ice. But don't worry, 'The Thing' is still a work of science fiction. For now. (2020-05-08)

Hidden army: How starfish could build up numbers to attack coral reefs
It is known that crown of thorns starfish lie in wait as algae-eating young before attacking coral. But new research from the University of Sydney shows the starfish that devastates reef habitats can remain in its juvenile vegetarian state for at least 6.5 years. This has big implications for how the coral predator is managed on the Great Barrier Reef. (2020-04-08)

The growth of an organism rides on a pattern of waves
Study shows ripples across a newly fertilized egg are similar to other systems, from ocean and atmospheric circulations to quantum fluids. (2020-03-23)

The health of coral reefs in the largest marine protected area in the world
Scientists at the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation have published their findings from extensive coral and reef fish surveys conducted on the Global Reef Expedition in the Cook Islands. What they found surprised the scientists. While many reefs were in good shape, coral reefs around the island of Aitutaki had been ravaged by an outbreak of crown-of-thorns starfish. In some places in Aitutaki, the starfish had consumed 80-99% of coral on the seafloor. (2020-03-04)

Four-hundred-eighty-million-year-old fossils reveal sea lilies' ancient roots
Sea lilies, despite their name, aren't plants -- they're ancient animals related to starfish, and they've been around since before the dinosaurs. Thanks to a newly-discovered 480-million-year-old fossil (named after the Greek goddess Athena for its long, skinny arms), researchers have a better idea of how sea lily arms evolved and are rewriting their family tree. (2019-12-09)

Animal embryos evolved before animals
A new study by an international team of researchers, led by scientists from the University of Bristol and Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, has discovered that animal-like embryos evolved long before the first animals appear in the fossil record. (2019-11-27)

Researchers say animal-like embryos preceded animal appearance
Animals evolved from single-celled ancestors before diversifying into 30-40 distinct anatomical designs. When and how animal ancestors made the transition from single-celled microbes to complex multicellular organisms is unclear. But a new scientific study suggests animal-like embryological traits developed long before animals themselves. (2019-11-27)

'Love hormone' has stomach-turning effect in starfish
A hormone that is released in our brain when we fall in love also makes starfish turn their stomach inside out to feed, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London. (2019-07-30)

'The way you move': Body structure brings coordinated movement
A computer model shows that a starfish-like animal can coordinate rhythmic motion based on body structure without the brain telling them to do so. This provides insights useful for physiology and robotics. (2019-07-12)

No silver bullet for helping the Great Barrier Reef
Using a combination of advanced satellite imaging and over 20 years of coral monitoring across the Reef, a team of researchers from Dalhousie University, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University (Coral CoE), the University of Adelaide and Lancaster University in the UK has found that chronic exposure to poor water quality is limiting the recovery rates of corals across wide swaths of the Great Barrier Reef. (2019-03-11)

Key sea star predator wiped out by disease and abnormally warm waters
From California to British Columbia, the abundance of sunflower starfish -- an important predator in the Northeast Pacific -- declined dramatically in both nearshore and deep waters from 2013 to 2015, according to a new study that leveraged citizen science diving surveys. This significant decline was due to the sea star wasting disease that ravaged the waters of the Northeast Pacific during this time. (2019-01-30)

Penguins, starfish, whales: Which animals will win and lose in a warming Antarctic?
Using risk assessments, like those used for setting occupational safety limits in the workplace, researchers determined the winners and losers of climate change in the Antarctic. They show that marine animals associated with sea ice for food or breeding, such as some whales and penguins, are most at risk from the effects of climate change, while seafloor predators and open-water feeding animals like starfish and jellyfish will benefit from the opening up of new habitat. (2019-01-17)

Study: Microbial dark matter dominates Earth's environments
Uncultured microbes--those whose characteristics have never been described because they have not yet been grown in a lab culture--could be dominating nearly all the environments on Earth except for the human body, according to a new study published in mSystems. (2018-09-25)

UB researchers discover a disease threatening the most plentiful starfish in Antarctica
A study led by experts from the University of Barcelona's Faculty of Biology and Institute for Research on Biodiversity (IRBio) have identified a disease that is affecting the starfish Odontaster validus, one of the most common species on the Antarctic sea floor. (2018-08-02)

Great Barrier Reef not bouncing back as before, but there is hope
The Great Barrier Reef is losing its ability to recover from disturbances, but effective local management could revive its capacity to bounce back. (2018-07-18)

More than 12,000 marine creatures uncovered during West Java deep-sea exploration
Scientists who participated in the South Java Deep Sea Biodiversity Expedition 2018 had collected more than 12,000 creatures during their 14-day voyage to survey the unexplored deep seas off the southern coast of West Java, Indonesia. (2018-04-17)

A starfish cold case reopens, climate change remains suspect
As ocean temperatures rise and oceanic diseases proliferate, species like sea stars struggle to survive, and scientists are looking for underlying causes. To bring clarity to the sea star disease problem, the scientists propose a new, broad nomenclature in a study published in Frontiers in Marine Science. (2018-03-13)

Taking stock of a thorny issue
A new book exploring the best scientific research on preventing coral-eating Crown-Of-Thorns Starfish (COTS) outbreaks, is expected to become a critical resource for informing management of these outbreaks across the Indo-Pacific. (2017-12-21)

Worm genomes reveal a link between ourselves and our distant relatives
Researchers from the Marine Genomics Unit at OIST, in collaboration with Okayama University, have decoded two worm genomes and found that they have several genetic similarities with the vertebrates. (2017-12-04)

Resilience of Great Barrier Reef offers opportunities for regeneration
New research has found that, despite the extensive damage to coral in recent events, there are still 100 reefs on the Great Barrier Reef that are well suited to promoting the regional recovery of the ecosystem after major disturbances. (2017-11-28)

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