Current Steel News and Events

Current Steel News and Events, Steel News Articles.
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Controlling deflection in construction beams
In civil engineering, flexural beams are used to control the effect of vibrations that can cause cracks to appear in surfaces (concrete slabs) and beams. This is particularly important in buildings that require high tensile strength and where the use of machinery can cause a lot of vibrations that can disturb structural integrity. (2021-02-22)

Eating more refined grains increases risk of heart attack & death: SFU researcher
A new study published in The British Medical Journal by researchers including SFU health sciences professor Scott Lear found consuming a high number of refined grains, such as croissants and white bread, is associated with a higher risk of major cardiovascular disease, stroke and death. (2021-02-19)

Nanotechnologies reduce friction and improve durability of materials
A team of scientists from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI and Immanuel Kant Baltic State Federal University suggested using innovative thin films to considerably reduce friction and thus increase the durability of surfaces in mechanisms. This discovery can be important for many fields, from medicine to space technologies. (2021-02-16)

Porous materials unfavorable for coronavirus survival
As COVID-19 spreads via respiratory droplets, researchers have become increasingly interested in the drying of droplets on impermeable and porous surfaces; surfaces that accelerate evaporation can decelerate the spread of the virus. In Physics of Fluids, researchers show a droplet remains liquid for a much shorter time on a porous surface, making it less favorable to survival of the virus. On paper and cloth, the virus survived for only three hours and two days, respectively. (2021-02-09)

Bio-inspired: How lobsters can help make stronger 3D printed concrete
New research addresses some of the technical issues that still need to be solved for 3D printed concrete to be strong enough for use in more free-form structures. Researchers found lobster-inspired printing patterns can make 3DCP stronger and help direct the strength where it's needed. And combining the patterns with a concrete mix enhanced with steel fibres can deliver a material that's stronger than traditionally-made concrete. (2021-01-19)

New nanobiomaterial from the silk of a mite with 'promising biomedical properties'
An international team of researchers has developed a new nanomaterial from the silk produced by the Tetranychus lintearius mite. This nanomaterial has the ability to penetrate human cells without damaging them and, therefore, has ''promising biomedical properties''. (2020-12-17)

Monash engineers improve fatigue life of high strength aluminium alloys by 25 times
A world-first study by Monash University engineers has demonstrated improvements in the fatigue life of high strength aluminium alloys by 25 times -- a significant outcome for the transport manufacturing industry. (2020-10-15)

Cnew research on SARS-CoV-2 virus 'survivability'
COVID-19 causing virus lasts for 10 days longer than Influenza on some surfaces Lower temps, glass, stainless steel and paper banknotes give virus longer life (2020-10-11)

Detecting SARS-CoV-2 in the environment
Researchers have outlined an approach to characterize and develop an effective environmental monitoring methodology for SARS CoV-2 virus, that can be used to better understand viral persistence in built environments. The investigators from 7 institutions published their research this week in mSystems, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2020-10-07)

Hydrogen embrittlement creates complications for clean energy storage, transportation
Hydrogen is becoming a crucial pillar in the clean energy movement, and developing safe and cost-effective storage and transportation methods for it is essential but complicated, because hydrogen can cause brittleness in several metals including ferritic steel. Recent advancements provide insight into the embrittlement process and a review of various methods in Applied Physics Reviews improves the understanding of the structure, property, and performance of ferritic steels subjected to mechanical loading in a hydrogen environment. (2020-10-06)

Story Tips: Remote population counting, slowing corrosion and turning down the heat
ORNL Story tips: Remote population counting, slowing corrosion and turning down the heat (2020-10-06)

Research may curb economic losses to power plants after earthquakes
Sitting atop power transformers are bushing systems that play a critical role in supplying communities with electricity. However, these objects are also susceptible to breaking during earthquakes. Once damaged, bushings can cause widespread outages and burden a state with expensive repairs. (2020-10-01)

Study shows heating in vaping device as cause for lung injury
Early results of an experimental vaping study have shown significant lung injury from E-cigarette (eC) devices with nickel-chromium alloy heating elements. The findings were consistent, with or without the use of nicotine, vitamin E oil or tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which have previously been thought to contribute to the life-threatening respiratory problem. (2020-09-28)

Dynamic kirigami shoe grip designed to reduce risks of slips and falls
The new kirigami-based shoe sole is intended to reduce the risks of slips and falls by adjusting as a person steps, increasing friction with pop-up spikes as necessary. (2020-08-20)

How soft hair deforms the sharpest steel blades
Why do the edges of a steel razor dull from cutting far softer materials? (2020-08-06)

Why shaving dulls even the sharpest of razors
Engineers at MIT have studied the simple act of shaving up close, observing how a razor blade can be damaged as it cuts human hair -- a material that is 50 times softer than the blade itself. They found that hair shaving deforms a blade in a way that is more complex than simply wearing down the edge over time. (2020-08-06)

Transforming e-waste into a strong, protective coating for metal
A typical recycling process converts large quantities of items made of a single material into more of the same. However, this approach isn't feasible for old electronic devices, or ''e-waste,'' because they contain small amounts of many different materials that cannot be readily separated. Now, in ACS Omega, researchers report a selective, small-scale microrecycling strategy, which they use to convert old printed circuit boards and monitor components into a new type of strong metal coating. (2020-07-29)

In one hour, surface coating inactivates virus that causes COVID-19
A chemical engineering professor at Virginia Tech has developed a surface coating that, when painted on common objects, inactivates SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. (2020-07-15)

Freshly printed magnets
During metal processing in the 3D laser printer, temperatures of more than 2,500 degrees Celsius are reached within milliseconds, causing some components of the alloys to evaporate. While widely considered a problem inherent to the process, Empa researchers spotted an opportunity - and are now using the effect to create new alloys with novel properties and embed them in 3D-printed metallic work pieces with micrometer precision. (2020-06-11)

New research leads to lighter and greener bridges
A recently completed research project revealed the potential for reducing material used for a suspension bridge deck by more than 25 per cent -- meaning a saving of up to 30 per cent of CO2 emissions. (2020-06-03)

Recycling plastics together, simple and fast
Scientists successfully blended different types of plastics to be recycled together, providing a solution to the environmental problem of plastic waste and adding economic value to plastic materials. (2020-06-02)

Coatings for shoe bottoms could improve traction on slick surfaces
MIT engineers, inspired by kirigami, the Japanese art of paper cutting, have designed a friction-boosting material that could be used to coat the bottom of your shoes, giving them a much stronger grip on ice and other slippery surfaces. (2020-06-01)

New Army 3-D printing study shows promise for predictive maintenance
Army researchers have discovered a way to monitor the performance of 3D printed parts, which tend to have imperfections that affect performance in ways traditionally-machined parts do not. (2020-05-21)

Emissions from road construction could be halved using today's technology
The construction sector accounts for a quarter of carbon dioxide emissions, in Sweden and globally. Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg studied the construction of an eight km stretch of road and calculated how emissions could be reduced now and by 2045, looking at everything from materials choice, production technology, supply chains and transport. (2020-05-18)

Riddled with holes: Making flexible thin-film electronics more durable
Researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology develop a simple approach for controlling the otherwise random formation of cracks in flexible thin-film conductors, greatly increasing the durability of flexible electrodes and transistors against bending and folding. (2020-05-18)

HKU super steel project attains major breakthrough
The Super Steel project led by Professor Huang Mingxin at the Department of Mechanical Engineering of the University of Hong Kong (HKU), with collaborators at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL), has made important breakthrough in its new super D&P steel (produced using a new deformed and partitioned method) to greatly enhance its fracture resistance while maintaining super strong in strength for advanced industrial applications. (2020-05-12)

Editorial: US healthcare must take a more proactive approach to prepare for future disasters
The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed major deficiencies and inequities in the US healthcare system, shining a spotlight on improvements that must be made to steel the country for future disasters, argues Maia. (2020-05-07)

Sustainable structural material for plastic substitute
A team lead by Prof. Shu-Hong Yu from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) report a high-performance sustainable structural material called cellulose nanofiber plate (CNFP) which is constructed from bio-based CNF and ready to replace the plastic in many fields. (2020-05-01)

Utilizing the impact resistance of the world's hardest concrete for disaster prevention
A team including Kanazawa University tested the impact performance of steel fiber-reinforced porosity-free concrete and estimated the maximum response to such impacts. They found that increasing the steel fiber content from 1% to 2% reduced the damage by impacts and that the behavior could be predicted with 80% accuracy. These findings are important contributions to the development of ultra-high-strength concrete for protecting buildings against natural disasters and incidents such as rock falls and blasts. (2020-04-22)

Texas A&M researchers uncover the art of printing extremely hard steels flawlessly
For millennia, metallurgists have been meticulously tweaking the ingredients of steel to enhance its properties. As a result, several variants of steel exist today; but one type, called martensitic steel, stands out from its steel cousins as stronger and more cost-effective to produce. Hence, martensitic steels naturally lend themselves to applications in the aerospace, automotive and defense industries, among others, where high-strength, lightweight parts need to be manufactured without boosting the cost. (2020-04-17)

Pushing the limits of 2D supramolecules
Researchers at the University of South Florida have reached a 'world record' in the development of two-dimensional supramolecules. (2020-04-16)

Achieving strong structures with carbon fiber reinforced plastics
Researchers of the Structural Engineering Laboratory, Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology have developed a new concept for strengthening steel in critical building structures using bond-free carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminates to enhance the buckling performance of structural steel elements. This method does not require steel surface treatment prior to CFRP application because the CFRP is not bonded onto the surface, which contributes to structural strength through its flexural rigidity. (2020-04-09)

Making stronger concrete with 'sewage-enhanced' steel slag
Researchers examined whether steel slag that had been used to treat wastewater could then be recycled as an aggregate material for concrete. Their findings? Concrete made with post-treatment steel slag was about 17% stronger than concrete made with conventional aggregates, and 8% stronger than raw steel slag. (2020-04-06)

Coffee grounds show promise as wood substitute in producing cellulose nanofibers
Researchers at Yokohama National University (YNU) meticulously examined cellulose nanofibers extracted from spent coffee grounds, identifying them as a viable new raw source. The YNU team, led by Izuru Kawamura, an associate professor at the Graduate School of Engineering Science, set out to build upon previous research into extracting cellulose nanofibers from coffee grounds. They published their findings on April 1 in the journal Cellulose. (2020-04-06)

How fire causes office-building floors to collapse
NIST researchers spent months meticulously recreating the long concrete floors supported by steel beams commonly found in high-rise office buildings, only to set the structures ablaze. These experiments indicate that structures built to code are not always equipped to survive the forces induced by extreme shifts in temperature, but the data gained here could help researchers develop and validate new design tools and building codes that bolster fire safety. (2020-03-24)

Study reveals how long COVID-19 remains infectious on cardboard, metal and plastic
The virus that causes COVID-19 remains for several hours to days on surfaces and in aerosols, a new scientific study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found. The study suggests that people may acquire the coronavirus through the air and after touching contaminated objects. (2020-03-20)

Composite metal foams take the heat, move closer to widespread applications
Engineering researchers have demonstrated that composite metal foams (CMFs) can pass so-called 'simulated pool fire testing' with flying colors, moving the material closer to use in applications such as packaging and transportation of hazardous materials. In addition, researchers used this experimental data to develop a model for predicting how variations in the CMF would affect its performance. (2020-03-19)

Metabolic fossils from the origin of life
Since the origin of life, metabolic networks provide cells with nutrition and energy. Modern networks require thousands of enzymes that perform catalysis. Such networks must have arisen from simpler precursors. Investigating the metabolism of modern cells, Xavier et al. have identified ancient and conserved autocatalytic networks at the core of microbial metabolism that require only co-factors and metals as catalysts. (2020-03-11)

New approach to sustainable building takes shape in Boston
A new building about to take shape in Boston's Roxbury area could, its designers hope, herald a new way of building residential structures in cities. (2020-03-05)

BAT study shows new vaping technology significantly reduces exposure to toxicants
A vapor product that contains new-to-world technology has significantly fewer and lower levels of certain toxicants compared to cigarette smoke, a study has shown. (2020-03-03)

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