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Current Stem Cells News and Events, Stem Cells News Articles.
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Research sheds new light on how brain stem cells are activated
This is a peer-reviewed observational study conducted in fruit flies. Neural stem cells are normally found in dormant states but can be reactivated by certain signals. This study sheds new light on what these signals are Scientists have found that neural stem cells use molecules that form a complex called STRIPAK to 'wake up' and produce new neurons (nerve cells) and surrounding glial cells in the brain. (2019-06-06)

Breaking down pathological protein aggregates
ETH researchers have discovered a new mechanism that brain cells use to protect themselves from protein aggregates. Such aggregates play a key role in Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases. This new finding might provide the basis for new therapeutic approaches. (2019-06-06)

NIH HIV experts prioritize research to achieve sustained ART-free HIV remission
Achieving sustained remission of HIV without life-long antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a top HIV research priority, according to a new commentary in JAMA by experts at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. (2019-06-06)

Scientists recreate blood-brain barrier defect outside the body
Scientists can't make a living copy of your brain outside your body. That's the stuff of science fiction. But in a new study, they recreated a critical brain component, the blood-brain barrier, that functioned as it would in the individual who provided the cells to make it. Their achievement provides a new way to make discoveries about brain disorders and, potentially, predict which drugs will work best for an individual patient. (2019-06-06)

Special issue: Organoids open frontiers in biomedicine, as design challenges are addressed
A Special Issue of Science featuring four Reviews illuminates ways in which organoid technology is opening up frontiers of research in biomedicine, allowing for the testing of cancer drugs on cells from individual patients, for example. (2019-06-06)

Cancer research using mini-organs from tumors and healthy tissue
Hans Clevers and David Tuveson, experts in the field of stem cells and organoids, have written a review that summarizes the use of organoids in cancer research and shines a light on prospects for the future. These mini-organs can be used to study tumor biology, model tumor development, and to test existing and new therapies in a patient specific way. The review was published in the scientific journal Science, on the 6th of June, 2019. (2019-06-06)

Brighter possibilities for treating blindness
Advances in preclinical research are now being translated into innovative clinical solutions for blindness, a review published in the 10th anniversary series of science Translational Medicine depicts. (2019-06-05)

Improved human brain organoids to boost neurological disease research
Research led by scientists at Harvard and the Broad Institute has optimized the process of making human brain 'organoids' -- miniature 3D organ models -- so they consistently follow growth patterns observed in the developing human brain. Researchers can use this reproducible experimental system to test drugs for neuropsychiatric diseases like autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia directly in human tissues. (2019-06-05)

Replicating fetal bone growth process could help heal large bone defects
To treat large gaps in long bones, like the femur, which often can result in amputation, researched developed a process in a rodent model that partially recreates the bone growth process that occurs before birth. (2019-06-05)

Nanotechnology treatment shows promise against multiple sclerosis
A nanotechnology treatment derived from bone marrow stem cells has reversed multiple sclerosis symptoms in mice and could eventually be used to help humans, according to a new study led by University of California, Irvine researchers. (2019-06-05)

Recreating embryonic conditions at break sites can help bones heal faster
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania have developed a unique technique that uses stem cells and flexible implantable bone-stabilizing plates to help speed the healing of large breaks or defects. (2019-06-05)

Researchers discover cells that change their identity during normal development
The ability of a developed cell to transform into another type of cell is exceptionally rare. But UVA researchers have discovered this in zebrafish. (2019-06-04)

Novel insights into cholesterol regulation may lead to new therapies for heart disease
In a landmark study, scientists at Houston Methodist Research Institute discovered what makes white blood cell counts spike in individuals who have high cholesterol, possibly leading to new therapies for heart disease. They looked at hypercholesterolemia, which is the type of high cholesterol that causes very high levels of LDL -- the so-called 'bad' cholesterol -- to circulate in the blood. They identified a new regulatory mechanism in zebrafish models responsible for this increase. (2019-06-04)

Killing the unkillable cancer cells
We all know someone affected by the battle against cancer. And we know that treatments can be quite efficient at shrinking the tumor but too often, they can't kill all the cells, and so it may come back. With some aggressive types of cancer, the problem is so great that there is very little that can be done for the patients. (2019-06-04)

'Only the stressed die young'
A new study has found that fruit flies lacking the transcription factor Ets21c live longer in a favourable, unstressed environment, but die earlier under stress. This serves as a promising lead that stress signalling pathways in which Ets-type transcription factors are involved may govern renewal in human epithelial tissues. (2019-06-04)

Zebrafish capture a 'window' on the cancer process
Cancer-related inflammation impacts significantly on cancer development and progression. New research has observed in zebrafish, for the first time, that inflammatory cells use weak spots or micro-perforations in the extracellular matrix barrier layer to access skin cancer cells. (2019-06-04)

Major stem cell discovery to boost research into development and regenerative medicine
A new approach has enabled researchers to create Expanded Potential Stem Cells (EPSCs) of both pig and human cells. The research from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and collaborators offers incredible potential for studying human development and regenerative medicine. Published in Nature Cell Biology today, this is the first time scientists have been able to derive stem cells from early pig embryos and will also be beneficial for animal health and food production. (2019-06-03)

'Organs in a dish' pave the way for personalized medicine in gut and liver disease
One of the most exciting advancements in stem cell research has been the development of organoid systems, which are organ-like three-dimensional structures that mimic their corresponding organ in vivo. In this important review in Digestive and Liver Disease, published by Elsevier, scientists highlight some of the established and exciting novel uses for organoids or 'organs in a dish' in gastroenterology and hepatology and look towards the future in this exciting field. (2019-06-03)

NIH-supported study reveals a novel indicator of influenza immunity
A study of influenza virus transmission in Nicaraguan households reveals new insights into the type of immune responses that may be protective against influenza virus infection, report investigators. The findings could help scientists design more effective influenza vaccines and lead to the development of novel universal influenza vaccines. The research was funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. (2019-06-03)

New genetic weapons challenge sickle cell disease
Researchers advancing gene-editing techniques to help patients with sickle cell disease discover an unexpected boost in fetal hemoglobin production, which mutes the effect of the disease. (2019-06-03)

Scientists bioengineer human liver disease in the lab to find new treatments
Scientists successfully bioengineered human liver organoids that faithfully mimic key features of fatal liver disease in the laboratory. This allowed them to uncover underlying disease biology in the organoids and test a potential therapy that in preclinical lab tests reversed an often-fatal childhood condition called Wolman disease. In findings published online by the journal Cell Metabolism, study overcomes major hurdles to unraveling the molecular mysteries of liver diseases and finding desperately needed new therapies. (2019-05-30)

Intranasal stem cell therapy restores smell in mice
A stem cell therapy delivered into the nose can restore the sense of smell in a mouse model of olfactory loss. The findings, published May 30, 2019 in the journal Stem Cell Reports, provide proof of principle for an approach that has the potential to be of broad utility for a range of clinical conditions causing loss of olfaction. (2019-05-30)

The FASEB Journal: Alternative molecular mechanisms observed in cancer cells
Current anti-cancer drugs can be quite effective but too often, tumors are not fought off completely and end up returning. A recent study published in The FASEB Journal provides the first evidence that some cancer cells evade therapy by switching over to alternative molecular mechanisms that are not affected by existing anti-cancer treatments. (2019-05-30)

CNIO researchers discover a new way to protect against high-dose radiation damage
Intensive radiotherapy can be toxic in 60% of patients with tumors located in the gastrointestinal cavity. Increases in URI levels protect mice against high-dose ionizing radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome and enhance mouse intestinal regeneration and survival in 100% of the cases. This finding could be useful to mitigate side effects of other sources of intensive radiation, such as nuclear accidents, nuclear warfare or the exposure to cosmic radiation during space explorations. (2019-05-30)

Combination of three gene mutations results in deadly human heart disease
The Human Genome project allowed scientists to identify some rare cases of disease caused by severe mutations of a single gene, but scientists believe that more common forms of disease may be the result of a combination of more subtle genetic mutations that act together. Yet experimental proof for this concept of human disease has remained elusive -- until now. (2019-05-30)

Scientists develop gel-based delivery system for stem cell-derived factors
In ongoing research to find a treatment for acute kidney injury, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) scientists have further advanced a promising approach using therapeutic factors produced by stem cells by creating a more efficient delivery method that would improve tissue regeneration. (2019-05-30)

Researchers identify new roles for common oncogene MYC
Cancer researchers have discovered surprising new functions for a protein called MYC, a powerful oncogene that is estimated to drive the development of almost half a million new cancer cases in the US every year. The study, which will be published May 29 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that MYC affects the efficiency and quality of protein production in lymphoma cells, fueling their rapid growth and altering their susceptibility to immunotherapy. (2019-05-29)

Stem cell study determines most harmful vape liquids
Novel approach reveals vaping's effect on endothelial cells and the most harmful flavors. (2019-05-28)

Stem cell identity unmasked by single cell sequencing technology
Scientists from The University of Queensland's Diamantina Institute have revealed the difference between a stem cell and other blood vessel cells using gene-sequencing technology. (2019-05-28)

Could gold be the key to making gene therapy for HIV, blood disorders more accessible?
Scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center took a step toward making gene therapy more practical by simplifying the way gene-editing instructions are delivered to cells. Using a gold nanoparticle instead of an inactivated virus, they safely delivered gene-editing tools in lab models of HIV and inherited blood disorders, as reported May 27, 2019 in Nature Materials. (2019-05-27)

First-of-its-kind study in endothelial stem cells finds exposure to flavored e-cigarette liquids, e-cigarette use exacerbates cell dysfunction
There has been a rapid rise in e-cigarette use, but its health effects have not been well-studied and their effect on vascular health remains unknown. A first of its kind study in endothelial stem cells, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, found acute exposure to flavored e-liquids or e-cigarette use exacerbates endothelial cell dysfunction, which often precedes heart disease. (2019-05-27)

New neurons form in the brain into tenth decade of life, even in people with Alzheimer's
Researchers examining post-mortem brain tissue from people ages 79 to 99 found that new neurons continue to form well into old age. The study provides evidence that this occurs even in people with cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, although neurogenesis is significantly reduced in these people compared to older adults with normal cognitive functioning. (2019-05-24)

Cancer cells are quick-change artists adapting to their environment
Until now, researchers have assumed that the growth of solid tumors originates from cancer stem cells characterized by specific surface markers, which develop in a fixed, hierarchical order. In a joint interdisciplinary project led by the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH), researchers now show that cancer cells of glioblastomas -- conspicuously aggressive solid brain tumors -- manifest developmental plasticity and their phenotypic characteristics are less constrained than believed. (2019-05-24)

Researchers discover how three-dimensional organization of the genome regulates cell differentiation
A new study from the University of Minnesota Medical School clarifies how the three-dimensional organization of the genome is regulated at the onset of skeletal muscle formation. (2019-05-24)

Plant stem cells require low oxygen levels
Joint Danish, Italian and German efforts reveal that low oxygen is required for proper development of plants. Their discovery is now published in the international scientific journal Nature. (2019-05-23)

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in non-Hodgkin lymphoma: benefit remains unclear
Meaningful studies are lacking for certain patient groups. Disease-specific registries could help close the data gap. (2019-05-23)

Targeting key gene could help lead to down syndrome treatment
Targeting a key gene before birth could someday help lead to a treatment for Down syndrome by reversing abnormal embryonic brain development and improving cognitive function after birth, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2019-05-23)

Experimental fertility preservation provides hope for young men
Testicular tissue samples obtained from 189 males who were facing procedures that could imperil fertility were cryopreserved at one university, proving the feasibility of centralized processing and freezing of testicular tissue obtained from academic medical centers, including Children's National, scattered around the world. (2019-05-23)

A road map to stem cell development
Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report they have created a method of mapping how the central nervous system develops by tracking the genes expressed in cells. The technique, demonstrated in mouse retinas for this study, follows the activity of the genes used by individual cells during development, allowing researchers to identify patterns in unprecedented detail. This precise kind of road map, say the researchers, could be used to develop future regenerative treatments for blinding and other neurological diseases. (2019-05-22)

Spatial DNA organization forms first, then the rest
The fundamental organization of the DNA in active and inactive compartments arises immediately after fertilization of the oocyte, even before genes are activated. This was discovered by researchers from the Hubrecht Institute and Helmholtz Center Munich and will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms behind the development of a single fertilized oocyte into a complete organism consisting of many different cell types. The results are published in Nature. (2019-05-22)

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