Current Stratosphere News and Events

Current Stratosphere News and Events, Stratosphere News Articles.
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Life from Earth could temporarily survive on Mars
German Aerospace Center scientists. The researchers launched these small lifeforms into Earth's stratosphere, which replicates key characteristics of the Martian environment, and found that some microorganisms, in particular spores of black mold, survived the trip. This new way of testing endurance to space travel will be invaluable for understanding the threats and opportunities of microbes in future missions to Mars. (2021-02-22)

Improved model estimates impact of ozone on soy crops
The impact of ozone on soybean production can be predicted more accurately thanks to improvements to a computer modelling system. (2021-02-01)

Climate change in antiquity: mass emigration due to water scarcity
The absence of monsoon rains at the source of the Nile was the cause of migrations and the demise of entire settlements in the late Roman province of Egypt. This demographic development has been compared with environmental data for the first time by professor of ancient history, Sabine Huebner of the University of Basel - leading to a discovery of climate change and its consequences. (2021-01-25)

Imminent sudden stratospheric warming to occur, bringing increased risk of snow over coming weeks
A new study led by researchers at the Universities of Bristol, Exeter, and Bath helps to shed light on the winter weather we may soon have in store following a dramatic meteorological event currently unfolding high above the North Pole. Weather forecasting models are predicting with increasing confidence that a sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) event will take place today, 5 January 2021. (2021-01-05)

Large volcanic eruption caused the largest mass extinction
Researchers in Japan, the US and China say they have found more concrete evidence of the volcanic cause of the largest mass extinction of life. Their research looked at two discrete eruption events: one that was previously unknown to researchers, and the other that resulted in large swaths of terrestrial and marine life going extinct. (2020-11-10)

International team tracks record-setting smoke cloud from Australian wildfires
Researchers with the University of Saskatchewan's Institute of Space and Atmospheric Studies are part of a global team that has found that the smoke cloud pushed into the stratosphere by last winter's Australian wildfires was three times larger than anything previously recorded. (2020-10-29)

Volcanic eruptions may explain Denmark's giant mystery crystals
Researchers have long been stumped for an explanation of how tens of millions of years-old giant crystals known as glendonites came to be on the Danish islands of Fur and Mors. A recent study from the University of Copenhagen offers a possible explanation to the conundrum: major volcanic eruptions resulted in episodes of much cooler prehistoric climates than once thought. (2020-10-14)

Indian monsoon can be predicted better after volcanic eruptions
Large volcanic eruptions can help to forecast the monsoon over India - the seasonal rainfall that is key for the country's agriculture and thus for feeding one billion people. As erratic as they are, volcanic eruptions improve the predictability, an Indian-German research team finds. What seems to be a paradox is in fact due to a stronger coupling between the monsoon over large parts of South and South-East Asia and the El Niño phenomenon after an eruption. (2020-09-18)

Gravity wave insights from internet-beaming balloons
A better understanding of how gravity waves in the upper atmosphere interact with the jet stream, polar vortex and other phenomena could be key to improved weather predictions and climate models. (2020-09-02)

First in situ radiation measurements 21 km up into the air over Tibetan Plateau
In situ vertical radiation measurements from the surface up to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), about 10~22 km in altitude, are rare over the TP or even over a large territory of China. The Institute of Atmospheric Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), in collaboration with the Aerospace Information Research Institute of CAS, developed a balloon-based measurement system to measure stratospheric radiation. (2020-08-27)

Discovery lays blame on supernova for extinction event nearly 360 million years ago
Between a decline in biodiversity and a series of extinction events, the Late Devonian period was not the most hospitable time on Earth. And then came one or more supernovae explosions whose resulting ionizing radiation was the final push that spelled the end for armored fish, most trilobites and other life. (2020-08-20)

Geoengineering is just a partial solution to fight climate change
Could we create massive sulfuric acid clouds that limit global warming and help meet the 2015 Paris international climate goals, while reducing unintended impacts? Yes, in theory, according to a Rutgers co-authored study in the journal Earth System Dynamics. Spraying sulfur dioxide into the upper atmosphere at different locations, to form sulfuric acid clouds that block some solar radiation, could be adjusted every year to keep global warming at levels set in the Paris goals. Such technology is known as geoengineering or climate intervention. (2020-07-20)

Geoengineering's benefits limited for apple crops in India
Geoengineering - spraying sulfur dioxide into the atmosphere to combat global warming - would only temporarily and partially benefit apple production in northern India, according to a Rutgers co-authored study. But abruptly ending geoengineering might lead to total crop failure faster than if geoengineering were not done, according to the study - believed to be the first of its kind - in the journal Climatic Change. (2020-07-15)

New opportunities for ocean and climate modelling
The continuous development and improvement of numerical models for the investigation of the climate system is very expensive and complex. At GEOMAR a new modular system has now been presented, which allows investigations to be carried in a flexible way, with varying levels of complexity. The system, called FOCI (Flexible Ocean and Climate Infrastructure), consists of different components that can be adapted and used, depending on the research question and available computing power. (2020-06-23)

Scientists present new method for remote sensing of atmospheric dynamics
Physicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have developed a new method for wind speed remote measurements. It may complement the widely employed lidar and radar sensing techniques. (2020-06-10)

Study: Reflecting sunlight to cool the planet will cause other global changes
Study finds reflecting sunlight to cool the planet will weaken extratropical storm tracks, causing other global changes. (2020-06-02)

Philippine volcanic eruption could prompt El Niño warming next winter
Climatological models suggest that gases from an erupting Philippine volcano could have significant impact on the global climate if more explosive eruptions occur. (2020-06-02)

Volcanic eruptions reduce global rainfall
POSTECH Professor Seung-Ki Min's joint research team identifies the mechanism behind the reduction in precipitation after volcanic eruptions. Volcano-induced El Niño amplifies the reduction in precipitation. Safety of geoengineering that mimic volcanoes is not guaranteed. (2020-05-27)

A new look into the sources and impacts of greenhouse gases in China
Special issue of Advances in Atmospheric Sciences reveals new findings on China's GHG emissions and documents changes in local and regional environments. (2020-05-18)

Why relying on new technology won't save the planet
Why relying on new technology won't save the planet Overreliance on promises of new technology to solve climate change is enabling delay, say researchers from Lancaster University. Their research in Nature Climate Change calls for an end to a longstanding cycle of technological promises and reframed climate change targets. They argue instead for cultural, social and political transformation to enable widespread deployment of both behavioural and technological responses to climate change. (2020-04-20)

NASA reports Arctic stratospheric ozone depletion hit record low in March
Ozone levels above the Arctic reached a record low for March, NASA researchers report. An analysis of satellite observations show that ozone levels reached their lowest point on March 12 at 205 Dobson units. While such low levels are rare, they are not unprecedented. Similar low ozone levels occurred in the upper atmosphere, or stratosphere, in 1997 and 2011. In comparison, the lowest March ozone value observed in the Arctic is usually around 240 Dobson units. (2020-04-16)

The right dose of geoengineering could reduce climate change risks
Injecting the right dose of sulphur dioxide into Earth's upper atmosphere to thicken the layer of light reflecting aerosol particles artificially could reduce the effects of climate change overall, exacerbating change in only a small fraction of places, according to new research by UCL and Harvard. (2020-03-19)

Verifying forecasts for major stratospheric sudden warmings
A new study sought to verify multi-system forecasts for major stratospheric sudden warmings using hindcasts of four systems archived in the subseasonal-to-seasonal prediction project database. (2020-02-17)

Galactic cosmic rays affect Titan's atmosphere
Planetary scientists using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) revealed the secrets of the atmosphere of Titan, the largest moon of Saturn. The team found a chemical footprint in Titan's atmosphere indicating that cosmic rays coming from outside the Solar System affect the chemical reactions involved in the formation of nitrogen-bearing organic molecules. This is the first observational confirmation of such processes, and impacts the understanding of the intriguing environment of Titan. (2020-02-14)

Iodine may slow ozone layer recovery
Air pollution and iodine from the ocean contribute to damage of Earth's ozone layer. (2020-01-13)

Snowmageddon warnings in North America come from tropics more than Arctic stratosphere
Scientists conducted the first ever study to identify how the four main winter weather patterns in the US and Canada behave depending on the strength of the stratospheric polar vortex. They found a strong connection with three of the patterns, but that the coldest conditions may be influenced more by the tropics. (2019-12-27)

Satellite analysis reveals and asymmetric Typhoon Bualoi
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite and NASA's Aqua satellite both passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and both used infrared light to obtain temperature data and shape information on Typhoon Bualoi. (2019-10-24)

Earthquakes can be predicted five days ahead
An international team of researchers, which includes physicists from HSE University and the RAS Space Research Institute (IKI), have discovered that, with an impending earthquake, the parameters of internal gravity waves (IGWs) can change five days before a seismic event. This data can help experts develop short-term earthquake forecast methods. The results of the study have been published in the journal Doklady Earth Sciences. (2019-10-23)

NASA-NOAA satellite finds overshooting tops, gravity waves in Tropical Storm Nestor
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided night-time and infrared views of developing Tropical Storm Nestor in the Gulf of Mexico and found over-shooting cloud tops and gravity waves. When the satellite passed over the potential tropical depression early on Oct. 18, it was consolidating. Less than 12 hours later, it became a tropical storm. (2019-10-18)

L-chondrite breakup might have contributed to Ordovician biodiversification
About 466 Mya, a major impact event took place between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. Space dust spread all across the solar system, and some of it was found near Saint-Petersburg, Russia, and in the south of Sweden. (2019-10-03)

Nuclear war between India and Pakistan would launch a global climate catastrophe
With ongoing tensions between India and Pakistan raising concerns about the possibility of nuclear conflict, even as neither country is likely to initiate without significant provocation, researchers have evaluated both the direct fatalities and global climate anomalies that would result if nuclear war did break out. The researchers evaluated this scenario for the year 2025. (2019-10-02)

Plugging the ozone hole has indirectly helped Antarctic sea ice to increase
A new study demonstrates that the recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole causes decreases in clouds over Southern Hemisphere (SH) high latitudes and increases in clouds over the SH extratropics. The decrease in clouds leads to a reduction in downward infrared radiation, especially in austral autumn. This results in cooling of the Southern Ocean surface and increasing Antarctic sea ice. (2019-09-29)

NASA-NOAA satellite catches Hurricane Kiko at night
Hurricane Kiko continued to track west through the Eastern Pacific Ocean when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and provided a view of the storm. Satellite imagery revealed an elongated shape, which indicated wind shear was still affecting Kiko. (2019-09-17)

New study investigates the role of Tambora eruption in the 1816 'year without a summer'
A new study has estimated for the first time how the eruption of Mount Tambora changed the probability of the cold and wet European 'year without a summer' of 1816. It found that the observed cold conditions were almost impossible without the eruption, and the wet conditions would have been less likely. (2019-09-17)

Mega-cloud from Canadian wildfires will help model impacts of nuclear war
Extreme wildfires in British Columbia, Canada, pumped so much smoke into the upper atmosphere in August 2017 that an enormous cloud circled most of the Northern Hemisphere -- a finding in the journal Science that will help scientists model the climate impacts of nuclear war. (2019-08-08)

Reevaluating the impacts of smoke plumes aloft, based on the 2017 Pacific Northwest wildfires
Extensive wildfires in the Pacific Northwest in the summer of 2017 unleashed a vast plume of smoke that ascended high into the stratosphere, persisted for more than eight months and provided researchers a rare opportunity to evaluate current models of smoke ascent. (2019-08-08)

Persistent plume
Thunderstorms generated by a group of giant wildfires in 2017 injected a small volcano's worth of aerosol into the stratosphere, creating a smoke plume that lasted for almost nine months. In a new paper in Science, authors led by Pengfei Yu (CIRES, NOAA, Jinan University), explore implications for climate modeling, including models of nuclear winter and geoengineering. (2019-08-08)

Making a case for returning airships to the skies
Reintroducing airships into the world's transportation-mix could contribute to lowering the transport sector's carbon emissions and can play a role in establishing a sustainable hydrogen based economy. According to the authors of an IIASA-led study, these lighter-than-air aircraft could ultimately increase the feasibility of a 100% sustainable world. (2019-08-02)

Airborne lidar system poised to improve accuracy of climate change models
Researchers have developed a laser-based system that can be used for airborne measurement of important atmospheric gases with unprecedented accuracy and resolution. The ability to collect this data will help scientists better understand how these atmospheric gases affect the climate and could help improve climate change predictions. (2019-07-22)

Chaos theory produces map for predicting paths of particles emitted into the atmosphere
Floating air particles following disasters and other geological events can have a lasting impact on life on Earth, and a new model drawing on chaos theory looks to help predict how these particles move, with an eye toward applications for geoengineering. Tímea Haszpra developed a model for following particles as they travel around the globe. Using it, she has generated maps that can be used to predict how particles will be dispersed above the world. (2019-07-16)

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