Current Strawberries News and Events

Current Strawberries News and Events, Strawberries News Articles.
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Plant droplets serve as nutrient-rich food for insects
Small watery droplets on the edges of blueberry bush leaves are loaded with nutrients for many insects, including bees, wasps and flies, according to a Rutgers-led study, the first of its kind. The study, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, suggests that these droplets are an important but underexplored feature in plants, with profound implications for insects in agricultural and natural ecosystems. (2020-09-29)

Glyphosate residue in manure fertilizer decrease strawberry and meadow fescue growth
A new study finds that glyphosate residue from herbicides in manure fertilizer decrease the growth of strawberry and meadow fescue as well as runner production of strawberry. (2020-09-18)

Single-cell RNA sequencing sheds new light on cancer cells' varied response to chemotherapy
Single-cell analysis, done in three colon cancer cell lines, is believed to be the first to profile transcriptome-level changes in response to DNA damage across individual cells. (2020-08-25)

More berries, apples and tea may have protective benefits against Alzheimer's
Older adults with low intake of foods and drinks containing flavonoids, such as berries, apples, and tea, were more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease and related dementias over 20 years, compared with people who consumed more of those items, according to a new study. (2020-05-05)

California's strict air quality regulations help farmers prosper, UCI-led study finds
In a new study in Nature Food, scientists from the University of California, Irvine and other institutions found that pollution controls mandated by the government of California have helped perennial crops produce more fruits and nuts, boosting productivity by $600 million per year from 1980 to 2015. (2020-03-16)

The discovery of a new gene that 'supervises' strawberry ripening
For the first time, a University of Cordoba research group has characterized a transcription factor that modulates more than 600 genes involved in strawberry ripening (2020-03-13)

Natural habitat around farms a win for strawberry growers, birds and consumers
Conserving natural habitat around strawberry fields can help protect growers' yields, their bottom line and the environment with no detectable threat to food safety, indicates a study led by the University of California, Davis. (2020-03-11)

Half billion-year-old 'social network' observed in early animals
Some of the first animals on Earth were connected by networks of thread-like filaments, the earliest evidence yet found of life being connected in this way. (2020-03-05)

Eliminating viruses in our food with cranberries and citrus fruit
Fresh produce is a major vehicle for noroviruses, a group of viruses that are the most common cause of gastroenteritis in developed countries. However, the viruses are quite resistant to cold pasteurization treatments such as irradiation, which are used to destroy bacteria, moulds, parasites, and insects. The irradiation process uses gamma rays or X-rays to destroy these viruses but at the dose needed to eliminate them, it can affect the physicochemical properties of fresh produce. (2020-02-19)

Dance of the honey bee reveals fondness for strawberries
Bees are pollinators of many plants, but their diversity and density is declining. A team led by Göttingen investigated their foraging behaviour in agricultural landscapes. They found that honey bees prefer strawberry fields, even if flowering next to oilseed rape fields. Only when oilseed rape was in full bloom were fewer honey bees in the strawberries. Wild bees, on the other hand, consistently chose the strawberry field. Results appeared in the journal Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment. (2020-01-24)

New study shows 'organic' wounds improve produce
Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists found benefits of insect leaf-wounding in fruit and vegetable production. Stress responses created in the fruits and vegetables initiated an increase in antioxidant compounds prior to harvest, making them healthier for human consumption. (2020-01-09)

A new gene involved in strawberry fruiting time is identified
The study, published by the University of Cordoba (Spain) and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA-ARS), takes a step further in understanding the mechanisms that control fruiting in strawberries. (2019-12-04)

Chameleon inspires 'smart skin' that changes color in the sun
Chemists used photonic crystals to develop a flexible smart skin that reacts to heat and sunlight while maintaining a near constant volume. (2019-09-11)

Part of the immune strategy of the strawberry plant is characterized
A University of Cordoba research group classified a gene family responsible for partial control of strawberry defense mechanisms when attacked by common pathogens in crop fields (2019-06-14)

As bumblebee diets narrow, ours could too
A new study from the University of California, Riverside, reveals the loss of plant diversity harms the humble bumble at a critical stage in its development from egg to adult. (2019-05-15)

The hunger gaps: How flowering times affect farmland bees
For the very first time, researchers from the University of Bristol have measured farmland nectar supplies throughout the whole year and revealed hungry gaps when food supply is not meeting pollinator demand. This novel finding reveals new ways of making farmland better for pollinators, benefitting the many crop plants and wildflowers that depend on them. (2019-05-01)

Breeding a better strawberry
An international team of scientists led by the University of California, Davis, and Michigan State University have sequenced and analyzed the genome of the cultivated strawberry, which will provide a genetic roadmap to help more precisely select desired traits. (2019-02-25)

The prospects of american strawberries
A team of 12 researchers from 10 different states embarked on an academic journey designed to generate an effective guideline essential for research, policy, and marketing strategies for the strawberry industry across the country, and to enable the development of general and region-specific educational and production tools. (2019-02-15)

Research characterizes evolution of pathway for reproductive fitness in flowering plants
Small RNAs are key regulators involved in plant growth and development. Two groups of sRNAs are abundant during development of pollen in the anthers. One of these pathways for sRNA production, previously believed present in grasses and related monocots, has now been demonstrated to be present widely in the flowering plants, evolved over 200 million years ago, and is arguably one of the evolutionary innovations that made them so successful. (2019-02-11)

Where do the best strawberries grow?
Agricultural production benefits enormously from flower-visiting bees and other insects. Hedgerows and the edges of forests represent important habitats for pollinators. A team from the University of Göttingen investigated whether hedgerows and their proximity to forests might affect the pollination of strawberries. In fact, both the weight and the quality of strawberries increased when plants were at hedgerows or hedgerows next to forests. The results were published in the journal Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment. (2019-02-04)

Fighting the crave for fattening food? Just surround yourself in its scent
A new study proves one sense can compensate another. (2019-01-16)

Genome published of the small hive beetle, a major honey bee parasite
Beekeepers and researchers will welcome the unveiling of the small hive beetle's genome by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their colleagues. The small hive beetle (SHB) is a major parasite problem of honey bees for which there are few effective treatments. Completing the SHB genome takes on even more importance when you realize that among the SHB's close relatives are the destructive and invasive Asian longhorned beetle. (2018-12-20)

Kiwifruit duplicated its vitamin C genes twice, 50 million and 20 million years ago
Today's kiwifruit, a member of the Chinese gooseberry family, contains about as much vitamin C as an orange. This extra boost in vitamin C production is the result of the kiwifruit's ancestors' spontaneously duplicating their DNA in two separate evolutionary events approximately 50-57 million and 18-20 million years ago, as reported September 20 in the journal iScience. (2018-09-20)

Jumping genes drive sex chromosome changes in strawberries
The discovery shows that plant sex regions can 'jump' and indicates that the phenomenon may be adaptive by gathering and locking new genes into linkage with sex. (2018-09-10)

What's that smell? Scientists find a new way to understand odors
Scientists from the Salk Institute and Arizona State University have discovered a new way to organize odor molecules based on how often they occur together in nature, and to map this data to discover regions of odor combinations humans find most pleasurable. (2018-08-29)

Strawberries could help reduce harmful inflammation in the colon
Inflammatory bowel disease is a set of painful conditions that can cause severe diarrhea and fatigue. Researchers are now reporting that a simple dietary intervention could mitigate colonic inflammation and improve gut health. In this case, a strawberry -- or rather, less than a cupful of strawberries -- a day could help keep the doctor away. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-08-20)

First study on physical properties of giant cancer cells may inform new treatments
Giant cancer cells are much larger and stiffer than other cancer cells and move further, study shows. (2018-08-13)

Allergy potential of strawberries and tomatoes depends on the variety
Strawberries and tomatoes are among the most widely consumed fruits and vegetables worldwide. However, many people are allergic to them, especially if they have been diagnosed with birch pollen allergy. A team from the Technical University of Munich has investigated which strawberry or tomato varieties contain fewer allergens than others and to what extent cultivation or preparation methods are involved. (2018-07-13)

Yeast adaptation study finds diploids evolve more slowly than haploids
A team of Lehigh University set out to answer a basic question: how do the rates of adaptation differ between haploid and diploid organisms? They found that diploids--with two copies of the genome--evolve more slowly than haploids--with only one copy. They also that the beneficial mutations diploids pick up look different compared to what is seen in haploids. Their results have been published in a paper in Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2018-03-26)

Algorithm could streamline harvesting of hand-picked crops
Richard Sowers, a professor of industrial and enterprise systems engineering and mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a team of students have developed an algorithm that promises to give valuable information to farmers of crops picked by hand. (2018-03-13)

Lab-made hormone may reveal secret lives of plants
A new synthetic hormone promises to tease apart the many different roles of the plant hormone auxin and could lead to a new way to ripen fruit. (2018-01-22)

Study shows that the consumption of antioxidant-rich foods is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes
A lower risk of type 2 diabetes has been observed among individuals consuming food rich in antioxidants. This effect is largely contributed by fruit, vegetables, tea and other hot beverages, as well as moderate consumption of alcohol, as shown in a recent study from an Inserm research group, published in Diabetologia. (2017-11-09)

Size matters: How thrips choose their partners
The bigger the male, the higher his chances to successfully mate -- this applies, at least, to thrips, insects that are hard to recognise with the naked eye. The larger males not only drive off their smaller rivals, they also have better immune systems and produce more sperm. This is a discovery that was made by biologists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) that recently appeared in the international Journal of Insect Behaviour. (2017-11-08)

Solar greenhouses generate electricity and grow healthy crops
Crops grown in electricity-generating solar greenhouses were as healthy as those raised in conventional ones, signaling the promise of this 'smart' technology. (2017-11-03)

Intake of pesticide residue from fruits, vegetables and infertility treatment outcomes
Eating more fruits and vegetables with high-pesticide residue was associated with a lower probability of pregnancy and live birth following infertility treatment for women using assisted reproductive technologies. (2017-10-30)

Material-independent nanocoating antimicrobial spray extends the shelf life of produce
The research team led by Professor Insung Choi of the Department of Chemistry developed a sprayable nanocoating technique using plant-derived polyphenol that can be applied to any surface. This new nanocoating process can be completed in seconds to form nanometer-thick films, allowing for the coating of commodity goods, such as shoe insoles and fruits, in a controlled fashion. (2017-08-10)

Parasitic worms may lead to agricultural stem cell breakthrough
A plant parasitic nematode is a pest that parasitizes the roots of agricultural crops and creates nests called 'galls' which deprive plants of nutrition. Research from Japan on plant reactions to parasitic worms shows that parasitism activates plant stem cells which grow to form galls on their roots. This finding is expected to improve crop breeds and alleviate nematode damage, which is estimated to cost hundreds of billions of dollars each year worldwide. (2017-07-18)

UNH researchers extend N.H. growing season for strawberries
Researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have succeeded in quadrupling the length of the Granite State's strawberry growing season as part of a multi-year research project that aims to benefit both growers and consumers. (2017-07-10)

More evidence shows natural plant compound may reduce mental effects of aging
Salk scientists find benefits of antioxidant fisetin in mouse model of premature aging, Alzheimer's disease. (2017-07-10)

Diatoms have sex after all, and ammonium puts them in the mood
New research shows a species of diatom, a single-celled algae, thought to be asexual does reproduce sexually, and scientists learned it's a common compound -- ammonium -- that puts the ubiquitous organism in the mood. (2017-07-07)

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