Current Subduction Zones News and Events | Page 2

Current Subduction Zones News and Events, Subduction Zones News Articles.
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'Portfolio' of marine reserves enhances fish populations
No-take fishing zones on their own act as valuable sources of fish for neighbouring reefs. These areas support more fish, which then produce even greater numbers of baby fish. But, just how many babies survive and where they end up varies greatly from year to year. Multiple smaller reserves instead of one large reserve can ensure a stable supply of fish. (2020-09-28)

Detaching and uplifting, not bulldozing
ETH researchers have used a computer model to test a new hypothesis about the formation of the Alps while simulating seismic activity in Switzerland. This will help improve current earthquake risk models. (2020-09-17)

Most landslides in western Oregon triggered by heavy rainfall, not big earthquakes
Deep-seated landslides in the central Oregon Coast Range are triggered mostly by rainfall, not by large offshore earthquakes. (2020-09-16)

Antarctica: cracks in the ice
In recent years, the Pine Island Glacier and the Thwaites Glacier on West-Antarctica have been undergoing rapid changes, with potentially major consequences for rising sea levels. However, the processes that underlie these changes and their impact on these ice sheets have not been fully charted. One of these processes has now been described in detail: the emergence and development of damage/cracks in part of the glaciers and how this process reinforces itself. (2020-09-14)

Shedding light on coral reefs
New research published in the journal Coral Reefs generates the largest characterization of coral reef spectral data to date. These data are an initial step in building a quantitative understanding of reef water clarity. With these data, coral reef scientists can begin to develop models to address fundamental questions about how reefs function, such as how much light reaches the various reef zones or how ecological zonation on reefs might be driven by light absorption. (2020-09-11)

Land development in New Jersey continues to slow
Land development in New Jersey has slowed dramatically since the 2008 Great Recession, but it's unclear how the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to fight societal and housing inequality will affect future trends, according to a Rutgers co-authored report. (2020-09-09)

Targeting 'cost-effective zones' to protect global biodiversity could help balance conservation goals and political priorities
Scientists have identified regions of land around the world with both high conservation value and low levels of human impact. These cost-effective zones (CEZs) - only 24% of which are currently covered by protected areas - could be incorporated into a post-2020 international biodiversity framework that balances conservation imperatives with political. (2020-09-09)

Fossil growth reveals insights into the climate
Panthasaurus maleriensis is an ancestor of today's amphibians and has been considered the most puzzling representative of the Metoposauridae. Paleontologists from Bonn (Germany) and Opole (Poland) examined the fossil's bone tissue and compared it with other representatives of the family also dating from the Triassic. They discovered phases of slower and faster growth in the bone, which apparently depended on the climate. (2020-09-08)

Japan's geologic history in question after discovery of metamorphic rock microdiamonds
A collaboration of researchers based in Kumamoto University, Japan have discovered microdiamonds in the Nishisonogi metamorphic rock formation in Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. Microdiamonds in metamorphic rocks are important minerals because they form in continental collision zones and show that the crust has penetrated deeper than 120 km below the surface. This is the second area in the world, after the Italian Alps, that shows microdiamonds can form in metamorphic rocks through subduction of oceanic plates. (2020-09-04)

A review of ridge subduction, magmatism and metallogenesis
Ridge subduction events are very common and important geodynamic processes in modern oceanic plate tectonics (Figure 1), and play an important role in the generation of arc magmatism, material recycling, growth and evolution of continental crust, deformation and modification of overlying plates and metallogenesis. Many issues concerning ridge subductions remain controversial. Recently, researchers reviewed the progress in the study of ridge subduction and discussed some developing research frontiers in the fields related to ridge subduction. (2020-08-28)

A Politecnico di Milano study reveals DNA "grammar"
DNA three-dimensional structure is determined by a series of spatial rules based on particular protein sequences and their order. This was the finding of a study recently published in Genome Biology by Luca Nanni, PhD student in Computer Science and Engineering at Politecnico di Milano, together with Professors Stefano Ceri of the same University and Colin Logie of the University of Nijmegen. (2020-08-27)

High walk and bike scores associated with greater crash risk
Neighbourhoods with high bikeability and walkability scores actually present higher crash risks to cyclists and pedestrians in Vancouver, according to new research from the University of British Columbia. (2020-08-27)

NBA playoff format is optimizing competitive balance by eliminating travel
In addition to helping protect players from COVID-19, the NBA 'bubble' in Orlando may be a competitive equalizer by eliminating team travel. Researchers analyzing the results of nearly 500 NBA playoff games over six seasons found that a team's direction of travel and the number of time zones crossed were associated with its predicted win probability and actual game performance. (2020-08-25)

UCalgary research delivers new insights into how skin can regenerate after severe burns
New research led by Dr. Jeff Biernaskie, PhD, has made an exciting leap forward in understanding how skin heals, which could lead to drug treatments to vastly improve wound healing. The study, published in the scientific journal Cell Stem Cell, was co-led by Dr. Sepideh Abbasi, PhD, Sarthak Sinha, MD/PhD candidate and Dr. Elodie Labit, PhD, postdoctoral fellow. (2020-08-19)

Machine learning unearths signature of slow-slip quake origins in seismic data
Combing through historical seismic data, researchers using a machine learning model have unearthed distinct statistical features marking the formative stage of slow-slip ruptures in the earth's crust months before tremor or GPS data detected a slip in the tectonic plates. (2020-08-18)

Traces of ancient life tell story of early diversity in marine ecosystems
If you could dive down to the ocean floor nearly 540 million years ago just past the point where waves begin to break, you would find an explosion of life--scores of worm-like animals and other sea creatures tunneling complex holes and structures in the mud and sand--where before the environment had been mostly barren. (2020-08-14)

Plate tectonics goes global
A research team led by Dr. WAN Bo from the Institute of Geology and Geophysics (IGG) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has revealed that plate tectonics went global 2 billion years ago. (2020-08-05)

Study: Oriole hybridization is a dead end
A half-century of controversy over two popular bird species may have finally come to an end. In one corner: the Bullock's Oriole, found in the western half of North America. In the other corner: the Baltimore Oriole, breeding in the eastern half. Where their ranges meet in the Great Plains, the two mix freely and produce apparently healthy hybrid offspring. But according to scientists from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, hybridization is a dead end and both parent species will remain separate (2020-08-03)

Is the Earth's transition zone deforming like the upper mantle?
In a recently published paper in Earth and Planetary Science Letters, researchers from the Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University and the University of Lille combine numerical modeling of dislocation glide and results from diffusion experiments to revisit the rheology of wadsleyite, ringwoodite and majorite garnet under geological strain rates across the transition zone of the Earth's mantle based on theoretical plasticity modeling. (2020-07-29)

Knowledge, concerns, behaviors of individuals during 1st week of COVID-19 pandemic in Italy
This is a survey study that examined the knowledge, concerns and behaviors of people living in different COVID-19 exposure zones during the first week of the pandemic in Italy. (2020-07-24)

Popular seafood species in sharp decline around the world
The first-ever global study of long-term trends in the population biomass of exploited marine fish and invertebrates for all coastal areas on the planet. (2020-07-21)

Microplastics in shrimp harmless to animal health and no effects on consumption quality
A study conducted by the UAB certifies that despite the presence of microplastics in deep-sea shrimp, the amounts detected do not cause any types of health problems. The research coincides with other studies pointing to the fact that there is no danger for human consumption, either. The research will be available in the next issue of Environmental Pollution. (2020-07-21)

Long-term strategies to control COVID-19 must treat health and economy as equally important
Strategies for the safe reopening of low and middle-income countries (LMICs) from months of strict social distancing in response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic must recognise that preserving people's health is as important as reviving the economy, argue an international team of researchers. (2020-07-12)

Reducing radioactive waste in processes to dismantle nuclear facilities
Margarita Herranz, professor of nuclear engineering at the UPV/EHU, leads one of the working groups in the Europe H2020 INSIDER project. The project aims to improve the management of contaminated materials by designing a methodology which allows the best scenarios in the dismantling, closing down and remediation of nuclear facilities to be specified and selected; the ultimate aim is for the waste to be properly characterised and for its storage and disposal routes to be clearly identified. (2020-07-08)

Curtin study could rewrite Earth's history
Curtin University-led research has found new evidence to suggest that the Earth's first continents were not formed by subduction in a modern-like plate tectonics environment as previously thought, and instead may have been created by an entirely different process. (2020-07-07)

New Curtin research uncovers the two 'faces' of the Earth
New Curtin University-led research has uncovered how rocks sourced from the Earth's mantle are linked to the formation and breakup of supercontinents and super oceans over the past 700 million years, suggesting that the Earth is made up of two distinct 'faces'. (2020-06-30)

FSU News: MagLab geochemists solve mystery of Earth's vanishing crust
A team of geochemists based at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has found new evidence that Earth has been consistently churning out crust since its formation 4.5 billion years ago and that some crust is made of ancient, resurfaced chunks. (2020-06-26)

New research reveals how water in the deep Earth triggers earthquakes and tsunamis
In a new study, published in the journal Nature, an international team of scientists provide the first conclusive evidence directly linking deep Earth's water cycle and its expressions with magmatic productivity and earthquake activity. (2020-06-24)

The Kerguelen oceanic plateau sheds light on the formation of continents
How did the continents form? Although to a certain extent this remains an open question, the oceanic plateau of the Kerguelen Islands may well provide part of the answer, according to a French-Australian team led by the Géosciences Environnement Toulouse laboratory (CNRS/Université Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier/IRD/CNES). (2020-06-19)

Polymers can fine-tune attractions between suspended nanocubes
In new research published in EPJ E, researchers demonstrate a high level of control over a type of colloid in which the suspended particles take the form of hollow, nanoscale cubes. This case has only previously been explored through theoretical calculations. (2020-06-19)

Geoscientists create deeper look at processes below Earth's surface with 3D images
Geoscientists at The University of Texas at Dallas recently used massive amounts of earthquake data and supercomputers to generate high-resolution, 3D images of the dynamic geological processes taking place far below the Earth's surface. In a study published April 29 in Nature Communications, the research team described how it created images of mantle flows in a subduction region under Central America and the Caribbean Sea. (2020-06-17)

The rafts used by viruses
The study may suggest new strategies to limit virus attacks and prevent or combat diseases like Sars and Covid-19 based on biomedical and engineering principles. The research was conducted by the University of Trento and by the University of Napoli Federico II, in collaboration with researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and at the University of Pittsburgh, in the USA, and with the universities of Palermo and Ferrara, where experiments were carried out (2020-06-16)

Scientists review the metallogenesis and challenges of porphyry copper systems above subduction zone
Porphyry copper ± molybdenum ± gold deposits (PCDs) are the most economically important magmatic-hydrothermal metallogenic system above subduction zones, which have supplied nearly 3/4 of the world's copper, 1/2 of the molybdenum and 1/5 of the gold, as well as large amounts of silver, zinc, tin and tungsten, with however their metallogenesis remaining controversial. Now researchers in Guangzhou have reviewed the recent progress in understanding the metallogenesis and remaining challenges of PCDs. (2020-06-15)

A raft that won't save you
New interdisciplinary research published in the Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids sheds light on how and why the cell membrane forms and grows lipid rafts triggered by ligand-receptor activity. The work could lead to new strategies and innovative approaches to prevent or fight the action of the virus through the integration of biomedical and engineering knowledge. (2020-06-15)

Steering new mobility in the right direction
The latest report from the National Institute for Transportation and Communities (NITC), by Marc Schlossberg and Heather Brinton of the University of Oregon, is a guide for city staff and leadership on adopting local policy and code to respond to the emergence of emerging transportation technologies and encourage their responsible use. (2020-06-12)

Which factors control the height of mountains?
Which forces and mechanisms determine the height of mountains? A group of researchers from Münster and Potsdam has now found a surprising answer: It is not erosion and weathering of rocks that determine the upper limit of mountain massifs, but rather an equilibrium of forces in the Earth's crust. This finding, published in Nature, is fundamentally new and important for the earth sciences. (2020-06-11)

Matrix imaging: An innovation for improving ultrasound resolution
In conventional ultrasounds, variations in soft tissue structure distort ultrasound wavefronts. They blur the image and can hence prove detrimental to medical diagnosis. Researchers at the Institut Langevin (CNRS/ESPCI Paris-PSL) have developed a new non-invasive ultrasound method that avoids such aberrations. (2020-06-11)

Remixed mantle suggests early start of plate tectonics
New Curtin University research on the remixing of Earth's stratified deep interior suggests that global plate tectonic processes, which played a pivotal role in the existence of life on Earth, started to operate at least 3.2 billion years ago. (2020-06-11)

Temperate insects as vulnerable to climate change as tropical species
In previous research, it has been assumed that insects in temperate regions would cope well with or even benefit from a warmer climate. Not so, according to researchers from the Universities of Uppsala and Lund in Sweden and Oviedo, Spain, in a new study. The earlier models failed to take into account the fact that insects in temperate habitats are inactive for much of the year. (2020-06-08)

New discovery could highlight areas where earthquakes are less likely to occur
Scientists from Cardiff University have discovered specific conditions that occur along the ocean floor where two tectonic plates are more likely to slowly creep past one another as opposed to drastically slipping and creating catastrophic earthquakes. (2020-06-02)

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