Current Sunflower News and Events | Page 2

Current Sunflower News and Events, Sunflower News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 6 | 219 Results
Cleaning out pollen shells (video)
As allergy season intensifies, many people are cursing pollen -- the powdery substance released by plants for reproduction. However, pollen may serve a purpose beyond making new plants and triggering sneezes. In ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, researchers report a new method for cleaning out the insides of pollen grains so that the non-allergenic shells can be used to carry medicines or vaccines into the human body. (2018-07-11)

RUDN chemists have completely changed the direction of Diels-Alder reaction
RUDN-based researchers together with Russian colleagues studied the Diels-Alder reaction in the derivatives of furan (a heterocyclic organic substance) and managed to reach 100 percent control over the composition of its products. The described patterns may be useful for creating new methods of agricultural waste processing. Moreover, the reaction may be used for the manufacture of graphene fragments and a number of biologically active substances. The results of the study were published in the Journal of Organic Chemistry. (2018-06-27)

Garden seed diet for threatened turtle doves has negative impact
New research into Britain's fastest declining bird species has found that young turtle doves raised on a diet of seeds foraged from non-cultivated arable plants rather than food provided in people's gardens are more likely to survive after fledging. Ecologists at the University of Lincoln, UK, investigated the dietary habits of European turtle doves using DNA analysis of faecal samples and found significant associations between the body condition and the source of the bird's diet. (2018-06-21)

RNA changes aided sunflower's rapid evolutionary transformation, domestication
A new University of Colorado Boulder-led study sheds light on the genetic mechanisms that allowed sunflowers to undergo a relatively rapid evolutionary transition from wild to domesticated in just over 5,000 years. (2018-06-11)

Genetics help make a weed a weed
New University of British Columbia research finds that the success of weedy and invasive plants like the Jerusalem artichoke lies in their genes. (2018-05-07)

Natural enemies reduce pesticide use
Crop variety in agriculture has a positive impact on the natural enemies of aphids. Farmers can use this insight to keep aphids at bay and cut down on pesticides. (2018-03-20)

A starfish cold case reopens, climate change remains suspect
As ocean temperatures rise and oceanic diseases proliferate, species like sea stars struggle to survive, and scientists are looking for underlying causes. To bring clarity to the sea star disease problem, the scientists propose a new, broad nomenclature in a study published in Frontiers in Marine Science. (2018-03-13)

Researchers find low magnesium levels make vitamin D ineffective
Vitamin D can't be metabolized without sufficient magnesium levels, meaning Vitamin D remains stored and inactive for as many as 50 percent of Americans. In addition, Vitamin D supplements can increase a person's calcium and phosphate levels even while they remain Vitamin D deficient. People may suffer from vascular calcification if their magnesium levels aren't high enough to prevent the complication. (2018-02-26)

Climate change, urbanization driving opossum's northward march
The headline reads like something from the satirical newspaper The Onion: 'Grand Forks opossum slain; body to go to University of Michigan for research.' (2018-02-08)

Omega-6 fats may help prevent type 2 diabetes
The risk of developing type 2 diabetes could be significantly reduced by eating a diet rich in omega-6 polyunsaturated fats, a new study suggests. These findings, published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, shed new light on the potential health benefits of omega-6, which is found in bean and seed oils such as soybean and sunflower oils and in nuts, and support clinical recommendations to increase dietary intake of omega-6 rich foods. (2017-10-11)

Pollinator extinctions alter structure of ecological networks
The absence of a single dominant bumblebee species from an ecosystem disrupts foraging patterns among a broad range of remaining pollinators in the system -- from other bees to butterflies, beetles and more, field experiments show. (2017-06-21)

Sunflower genome sequence to provide roadmap for more resilient crops
University of Georgia researchers are part of an international team that has published the first sunflower genome sequence. This new resource will assist future research programs using genetic tools to improve crop resilience and oil production. (2017-05-22)

In brain evolution, size matters -- most of the time
Which came first, overall bigger brains or larger brain regions that control specialized behaviors? Neuroscientists have debated this question for decades, but a new Cornell University study settles the score. (2017-05-10)

New findings may explain the advantages of polyunsaturated fat
Previous research has demonstrated that saturated fat is more fattening and less muscle building than polyunsaturated fats. A new study shows that the choice of fat causes epigenetic changes which in turn could contribute to differences in fat storage. (2017-05-08)

Lubing up industry, the natural way
Sesame oil might make a viable and sustainable alternative to mineral oil as an industrial lubricant, according to research published in the International Journal of Agricultural Resources, Governance and Ecology. (2017-05-08)

Turning chicken poop and weeds into biofuel
Chicken is a favorite, inexpensive meat across the globe. But the bird's popularity results in a lot of waste that can pollute soil and water. One strategy for dealing with poultry poop is to turn it into biofuel, and now scientists have developed a way to do this by mixing the waste with another environmental scourge, an invasive weed that is affecting agriculture in Africa. They report their approach in ACS' journal Energy & Fuels. (2017-05-03)

Sunflower seeds traced as source of toxic mold, potent liver carcinogen
Michigan State University researchers have shown that sunflower seeds are frequently contaminated with a toxin produced by molds and pose an increased health risk in many low-income countries worldwide. (2017-04-21)

Busy city living makes some house finches more savvy than others
House finches that frequent North American cities and towns are better at solving problems than their rural counterparts. They are able to solve new problems even when humans are around, says Meghan Cook of Arizona State University in the US, lead author of a study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. The study investigated how increased urbanization and human presence affects the behavior and foraging habits of wildlife, and how birds, in particular, cope. (2017-04-18)

New lettuce genome assembly offers clues to success of huge plant family
UC Davis researchers have unlocked a treasure-trove of genetic information about lettuce and related plants, completing the first reported comprehensive genome assembly for lettuce and the massive Compositae plant family. (2017-04-12)

UBC researchers connect common fats to a lazy lifestyle and diabetes
A UBC researcher is suggesting the types of cooking oils people consume may be sabotaging their efforts to stay healthy and avoid illnesses such as diabetes. (2017-04-12)

Wildly stronger sunflowers
Annually, diseases, weeds, and insects are estimated to cause more than $1.3 billion in losses for sunflower growers. To combat this, researchers are preserving the genetic diversity of wild sunflowers. Wild plants retain the genes needed to resist pests and survive in different environments. (2017-03-15)

Physicians analyze food trends and publish dietary prescription for optimal heart health
Nutrition researcher Neal Barnard, M.D., F.A.C.C., president and founder of the nonprofit Physicians Committee, and 11 other authors, including Andrew Freeman, M.D., Pamela Morris, M.D., Caldwell Esselstyn, M.D., Dean Ornish, M.D., and Kim Williams, M.D., reviewed the latest research behind popular food trends for 'Trending Cardiovascular Nutrition Controversies,' which appears in the March 7, 2017 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2017-03-03)

Diverse natural fatty acids follow 'Golden Mean'
Bioinformatics scientists at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena (Germany) have discovered that the number of theoretically possible fatty acids with the same chain length but different structures can be determined with the aid of the famous Fibonacci sequence. As they explain in Scientific Reports, the number of possible fatty acids with increasing chain length rises at each step by a factor of approximately 1.618, and therefore agrees with what is called the 'Golden Mean.' (2017-01-27)

New plant named to honor the peace-making efforts of the Colombian President
Named to honor the peace-making efforts of Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, a new species of the sunflower family genus Espeletia is described from the Páramo de Presidente. The study was published in the open access journal PhytoKeys. (2017-01-06)

Sea star wasting disease had severe impact on sunflower sea stars in the Salish Sea
Sea star wasting disease caused a severe decline in sunflower sea star populations in the Salish Sea off the coast of British Columbia and northern Washington state, according to a study published Oct. 26, 2016, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Diego Montecino-Latorre from the University of California Davis, USA and colleagues. (2016-10-26)

Survey shows impact of sea star wasting disease in Salish Sea
Sea star wasting disease has devastated intertidal populations of these animals on the West coast from Mexico to Alaska. But what about sea stars that live below the low tide line, mostly out of sight? An analysis of data collected by divers in the Salish Sea shows severe impacts on some species, especially the sunflower sea star, Pycnopodia helianthoides. (2016-10-26)

Cut dietary omega 6 and boost omega 3 to curb soaring obesity rates, urge experts
Governments and international bodies should ditch their obsession with calories and energy expenditure to curb soaring obesity rates, and instead focus on restoring the correct balance of omega 6 and omega 3 fatty acids in the food supply chain and diet, urge experts in an editorial in the online journal Open Heart. (2016-10-24)

A tough day could erase the perks of choosing 'good' fat sources, study finds
The type of fat you eat matters, but a new study suggests that the benefits of good fats vanish when stress enters the picture. (2016-10-05)

Sunflowers move from east to west, and back, by the clock
At the nearby University of California, Davis, plant biologists have now discovered how sunflowers use their internal circadian 'clocks,' acting on growth hormones, to follow the sun during the day as they grow. (2016-08-25)

Polyunsaturated fat in adipose tissue linked to lower mortality
In a study from Uppsala University, published in the American journal JAMA Cardiology, the fatty acid linoleic acid (Omega 6) in subcutaneous adipose tissue was linked to lower mortality among older men followed over a 15-year period. (2016-08-18)

Undergraduates uncover mechanism tied to plant height
Dwarfed plants add color and a diversity of architectures to landscapes and gardens, and a Purdue University undergraduate class discovered a key mechanism that leads to their small stature. (2016-08-08)

Sunflowers move by the clock
Plant biologists at UC Davis and colleagues have discovered how sunflowers use their internal circadian clock, acting on growth hormones, to follow the sun during the day as they grow. Following the sun allows the plants to grow faster and put on more biomass. (2016-08-04)

Population boom preceded early farming
University of Utah anthropologists counted the number of carbon-dated artifacts at archaeological sites and concluded that a population boom and scarce food explain why people in eastern North America domesticated plants for the first time on the continent about 5,000 years ago. (2016-08-02)

Sea star death triggers ecological domino effect
A new study by Simon Fraser University marine ecologists has discovered that a mass mortality of sea stars resulted in a domino effect on the B.C. West Coast's Howe Sound marine ecology. In the summer of 2013, millions of sea stars along the West Coast contracted a wasting disease and died in one of the largest wildlife mass mortality events ever recorded. (2016-06-23)

Sunflower pollen protects bees from parasites
Solitary mason bees specializing on sunflower pollen were not attacked by a common brood-parasitic wasp, which lays eggs in the nests, where its larvae kill bee eggs and eat their pollen provisions. (2016-06-14)

How females store sperm
The science of breeding chickens has revealed part of the mystery of how certain female animals are able to store sperm long-term. Droplets of fat transferred from female cells to sperm cells may contribute to keeping sperm alive. A scientific understanding of how sperm can be kept viable longer could benefit any fertility-related work. (2016-06-13)

Omega-3 fatty acids shown to exert a positive effect on the aging brain
Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin were able to show that omega-3 fatty acid supplementation improves memory function in humans. They studied the effects of supplementation with natural omega-3 fatty acids in healthy older adults over a period of six months. Results from the study, which show that supplementation leads to significant improvements in memory function, have been published in the current issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. (2016-03-15)

Zinnias from space!
In space, there is no scent of baking bread, no wind on your face, no sound of raindrops hitting the roof, no favorite kitten to curl up in your lap. Over time, being deprived of these common earthbound sense stimulations takes a toll. Having limited access to stimuli to the senses is identified as a significant risk by NASA's Behavioral Health and Performance team. (2016-01-19)

Beyond species counts: Using evolutionary history to inform conservation
With limited funding available, a common strategy for conservation planners is to identify areas of high species richness and endemicity, but this approach ignores evolutionary history and so may overlook important regions for conservation. A recent study, available in Applications in Plant Sciences, argues for the importance of incorporating phylogenetic diversity metrics in conservation planning. The study tests a dozen commonly used metrics so users can determine which metrics should be used in which situations. (2015-09-03)

Mechanism outlined by which inadequate vitamin E can cause brain damage
Researchers have discovered how vitamin E deficiency may cause neurological damage by interrupting a supply line of specific nutrients and robbing the brain of the 'building blocks' it needs to maintain neuronal health. It found that nutrients needed to build and maintain the brain can be cut by more than half, with possible implications for an elevated risk of Alzheimer's disease. (2015-04-13)

Page 2 of 6 | 219 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.