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Current Supercapacitors News and Events, Supercapacitors News Articles.
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Need more energy storage? Just hit 'print'
Drexel University researchers have developed a conductive ink made from a special type of material they discovered, called MXene, that was used by the Trinity College researchers to print components for electronic devices. The ink is additive-free, which means it can print the finished devices in one step without any special finishing treatments. (2019-04-17)

New 'blue-green' solution for recycling world's batteries
Rice University materials scientists demonstrate an environmentally friendly solution to remove valuable cobalt and lithium metals from spent lithium-ion batteries. The metals and the eutectic solvent they use to extract them can then be recycled. (2019-04-01)

Right electrolyte doubles novel two-dimensional material's ability to store energy
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Drexel University and their partners have discovered a way to improve the energy density of promising energy-storage materials, conductive two-dimensional ceramics called MXenes. (2019-03-04)

New materials for high-voltage supercapacitors
A research team led by Tohoku University in Japan has developed new materials for supercapacitors with higher voltage and better stability than other materials. Their research was recently published in the journal Energy and Environmental Science. (2019-02-07)

Insight into the catalytic activity of MXenes for hydrogen evolution reaction
MXenes have exhibited great potential as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). However, insight into the origin of activity is still missing. Herein, on the basis of a systematical investigation of the HER performance of 20 MXenes, a Fermi-abundance model is proposed to understand variation of the activity in different MXenes. It is found that the occupied p electronic states of surface O atoms play a decisive role in the HER activity of MXenes. (2018-11-29)

The shape of things to come: Flexible, foldable supercapacitors for energy storage
A team of researchers from the Plasma Physics Research Centre, Science and Research Branch of Islamic Azad University in Tehran, Iran, have discovered a way of making paper supercapacitors for electricity storage. (2018-11-20)

Materials scientist creates fabric alternative to batteries for wearable devices
A major factor holding back development of wearable biosensors for health monitoring is the lack of a lightweight, long-lasting power supply. Now scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst led by materials chemist Trisha L. Andrew report that they have developed a method for making a charge-storing system that is easily integrated into clothing for 'embroidering a charge-storing pattern onto any garment.' (2018-11-08)

3D-printed supercapacitor electrode breaks records in lab tests
Scientists at UC Santa Cruz and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have reported unprecedented performance results for a supercapacitor electrode. The researchers fabricated electrodes using a printable graphene aerogel to build a porous three-dimensional scaffold loaded with pseudocapacitive material. In laboratory tests, the novel electrodes achieved the highest areal capacitance (electric charge stored per unit of electrode surface area) ever reported for a supercapacitor. (2018-10-18)

Greater than the sum of its parts
Argonne scientists and their collaborators have developed a new model that merges basic electrochemical theory with theories used in different contexts, such as the study of photoelectrochemistry and semiconductor physics, to describe phenomena that occur in any electrode. (2018-09-18)

FeCo-selenide -- Next-generation material in energy storage devices?
In a paper in the forthcoming issue of NANO, a team of researchers have fabricated an asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) based on FeCo-selenide nanosheet arrays as positive electrode and Fe2O3 nanorod arrays as negative electrode. There is evidence that FeCo-selenide could be the next-generation promising electrode materials in energy storage devices. (2018-08-28)

Genetically engineered virus spins gold into beads
Engineers at the University of California, Riverside, have altered a virus to arrange gold atoms into spheroids measuring a few nanometers in diameter. The finding could make production of some electronic components cheaper, easier, and faster. (2018-08-23)

A computational method for designing a new type of 2D carbons
Scientists from EPFL and Berkeley have developed a computational method for designing a new type of two-dimensional carbon materials called Schwarzites. (2018-08-13)

Hybrid nanomaterials bristle with potential
Triple-layered nanoarray electrode promises to boost battery performance and enhance other electrochemical processes. (2018-08-12)

A breakthrough of monitoring energy storage at work using optical fibers
An optic fiber sensing system developed by researchers in China and Canada can peer inside supercapacitors and batteries to observe their state of charge. (2018-07-29)

Wood to supercapacitors
Carbon aerogels are ultralight, conductive materials, which are extensively investigated for applications in supercapacitor electrodes in electrical cars and cell phones. Chinese scientists have now found a way to make these electrodes sustainably. The aerogels can be obtained directly from cellulose nanofibrils, the abundant cell-wall material in wood, finds the study reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2018-05-24)

A new way to atomically thin materials
Metallic conductivity and hydrophilicity of MXenes have established them as electrodes in rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, as well as other applications, including photothermal cancer therapy, electromagnetic shielding, water purification and gas sensing. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers have now introduced a new production method. Instead of using conventional, yet more expensive, titanium aluminum carbide, they selectively etch silicon out of titanium silicon carbide, a cheaper and more common precursor, to synthesize titanium carbide. (2018-04-04)

'Candy cane' polymer weave could power future functional fabrics and devices
If scientists are going to deliver on the promise of implantable artificial organs or clothing that dries itself, they'll first need to solve the problem of inflexible batteries that run out of juice too quickly. Today, researchers report that they've developed a new material by weaving two polymers together in a way that increases charge storage capacity. The researchers are presenting their results at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-03-20)

Durable wood 'sponges' act as green sensors of mechanical strain
Striking just the right balance between softness and sturdiness, balsa wood is a choice material for crafting anything from model airplanes to full-size wind turbine blades. Scientists have opened up a new realm of possibilities for balsa by hijacking its natural structure with chemical and physical treatments to transform it into a 'wood carbon sponge' capable of enduring repeated compression and other extreme mechanical conditions. Their work appears March 1 in the journal Chem. (2018-03-01)

Durable wood carbon sponge could be the future of wearable sensors, pollutant treatment
Engineers have for the first time demonstrated that wood can be directly converted into a carbon sponge capable of enduring repeated compression and other extreme mechanical conditions. This new wood carbon sponge overcomes several limiting factors of other lightweight, compressible carbon sponges because it is simpler, less expensive, and more sustainable to produce. It can be used in various applications such as energy storage (e.g., batteries), pollutant treatment, and electronic devices and sensors. (2018-03-01)

New graphene laser technique opens door for edible electronics
Electronics, the lifeblood of the modern world, could soon be part of our daily diet. In a study appearing in ACS Nano, scientists report that they have developed a way to write graphene patterns onto virtually any surface including food. They say the new technique could lay the groundwork for the edible electronics capable of tracing the progression of foods from farm to table, as well as detecting harmful organisms that can cause gastric distress. (2018-02-28)

Inspired by nature: Design for new electrode could boost supercapacitors' performance
Mechanical engineers from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science and four other institutions have designed a super-efficient and long-lasting electrode for supercapacitors. The device's design was inspired by the structure and function of leaves on tree branches, and it is more than 10 times more efficient than other designs. (2018-02-23)

NTU scientists create customizable, fabric-like power source for wearable electronics
Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have created a customizable, fabric-like power source that can be cut, folded or stretched without losing its function. Being highly stretchable, these flexible power sources are promising next-generation 'fabric' energy storage devices that could be integrated into wearable electronics. The team's findings have been published in the journal Advanced Materials. (2018-01-30)

TU Wien develops new semiconductor processing technology
Extremely fine porous structures with tiny holes -- resembling a kind of sponge at nano level -- can be generated in semiconductors. This opens up new possibilities for the realization of tiny sensors or unusual optical and electronic components. There have already been experiments in this area with porous structures made from silicon. Now, researchers at TU Wien have succeeded in developing a method for the controlled manufacture of porous silicon carbide. (2018-01-22)

Working in the cold
When it is cold in winter, cars tend to have starting problems. This is not much better with electric cars, which inevitably lose capacity of their rechargeable lithium-ion batteries at freezing temperatures. Now, Chinese scientists have offered a strategy to avoid plunging battery kinetics. In a study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie, they designed a battery system with a cold-enduring hard-carbon anode and a powerful lithium-rich cathode, with the important initial lithiation step integrated. (2017-12-05)

Hybrid electrolyte enhances supercapacitance in vertical graphene nanosheets
Supercapacitors can store more energy than and are preferable to batteries because they are able to charge faster, mainly due to the vertical graphene nanosheets that are larger and positioned closer together. Using VGNs as the material for supercapacitor electrodes offers advantages that can be enhanced depending on how the material is grown, treated and prepared to work with electrolytes. In this week's Journal of Applied Physics, researchers discuss ways to improve the material's properties. (2017-12-05)

Hydrogen cars for the masses one step closer to reality, thanks to UCLA invention
UCLA researchers have designed a new device that can inexpensively and efficiently create and store energy and create hydrogen fuel, and that needs only sunlight to operate. (2017-11-20)

Synthetic material acts like an insect cloaking device
Synthetic microspheres with nanoscale holes can absorb light from all directions across a wide range of frequencies, making them a candidate for antireflective coatings, according to a team of Penn State engineers. The synthetic spheres also explain how the leaf hopper insect uses similar particles to hide from predators in its environment. (2017-11-03)

Rapid cellphone charging getting closer to reality
The ability to charge cellphones in seconds is one step closer after researchers at the University of Waterloo used nanotechnology to significantly improve energy-storage devices known as supercapacitors. (2017-10-25)

Taming 'wild' electrons in graphene
Graphene -- a one-atom-thick layer of the stuff in pencils -- is a better conductor than copper and is very promising for electronic devices, but with one catch: Electrons that move through it can't be stopped. Until now, that is. Scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick have learned how to tame the unruly electrons in graphene, paving the way for the ultra-fast transport of electrons with low loss of energy in novel systems. Their study was published online in Nature Nanotechnology. (2017-10-23)

Paper-based supercapacitor uses metal nanoparticles to boost energy density
Using a simple layer-by-layer coating technique, researchers from the US and Korea have developed a paper-based flexible supercapacitor that could be used to help power wearable devices. The device uses metallic nanoparticles to coat cellulose fibers in the paper, creating supercapacitor electrodes with high energy and power densities -- and the best performance so far in a textile-based supercapacitor. (2017-10-05)

Spinning a lighter, safer electrode
A group of Drexel University researchers have created a fabric-like material electrode that could help make energy storage devices -- batteries and supercapacitors -- faster and less susceptible to leaks or disastrous meltdowns. Their design for a new supercapacitor, which looks something like a furry sponge infused with gelatin, offers a unique alternative to the flammable electrolyte solution that is a common component in these devices. (2017-09-20)

Just squeeze in -- when spaces are tight, nature loosens its laws
It turns out that when they're in a hurry and space is limited, ions, like people, will find a way to cram in -- even if that means defying nature's norms. Recently published research from an international team of scientists, including Drexel University's Yury Gogotsi, PhD, shows that the charged particles will actually forgo their 'opposites attract' behavior, called Coulombic ordering, when confined in the tiny pores of a nanomaterial. (2017-09-18)

Innovation could mean flexible rechargeable batteries for pacemakers
Experts at Queen's University Belfast have designed a flexible and organic alternative to the rigid batteries that power up medical implants. (2017-09-13)

High-tech electronics made from autumn leaves
Northern China's roadsides are peppered with deciduous phoenix trees, producing an abundance of fallen leaves in autumn. These leaves are generally burned in the colder season, exacerbating the country's air pollution problem. Investigators in Shandong, China, recently discovered a new method to convert this organic waste matter into a porous carbon material that can be used to produce high-tech electronics. The advance is reported in the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy. (2017-08-29)

Candy cane supercapacitor could enable fast charging of mobile phones
Supercapacitors promise recharging of phones and other devices in seconds and minutes as opposed to hours for batteries. But current technologies are not usually flexible, have insufficient capacities, and for many their performance quickly degrades with charging cycles. Researchers at Queen Mary University of London and the University of Cambridge have found a way to improve all three problems in one stroke. (2017-08-16)

From greenhouse gas to 3-D surface-microporous graphene
Tiny dents in the surface of graphene greatly enhances its potential as a supercapacitor. Even better, it can be made from carbon dioxide in a novel approach developed by researchers from Michigan Technological University and Brookhaven National Laboratory. The process uses a heat-releasing reaction to dig micropores into 3-D graphene and could be a useful supercapacitor material. (2017-08-07)

Natural molecule to boost the performance of electrodes for rechargeable batteries
Chlorophyll, blood, and vitamin B12 are all based on the porphyrin molecule. But porphyrin can also be used as an electrode material where it speeds up the charging process of rechargeable batteries. In the 'Angewandte Chemie International Edition' journal, researchers from KIT now present the new material system that could mark the beginning of an era of high-performance energy storage and supercapacitors. (2017-07-25)

Smart toys without the batteries
The greatest challenge in entertaining young children is keeping their toys powered up. Now, one group reports in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering that they are one step closer to battery-free interactive games. (2017-07-19)

Team develops fast, cheap method to make supercapacitor electrodes
University of Washington researchers have developed a fast, inexpensive method to make electrodes for supercapacitors, with applications in electric cars, wireless telecommunications and high-powered lasers. (2017-07-17)

In the fast lane -- conductive electrodes are key to fast-charging batteries
Can you imagine fully charging your cell phone in just a few seconds? Researchers in Drexel University's College of Engineering can, and they took a big step toward making it a reality with their recent work unveiling of a new battery electrode design in the journal Nature Energy. (2017-07-10)

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