Current Supercomputer News and Events

Current Supercomputer News and Events, Supercomputer News Articles.
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Supercomputer turns back cosmic clock
Astronomers have tested a method for reconstructing the state of the early Universe by applying it to 4000 simulated universes using the ATERUI II supercomputer at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ). They found that together with new observations the method can set better constraints on inflation, one of the most enigmatic events in the history of the Universe. The method can shorten the observation time required to distinguish between various inflation theories. (2021-02-16)

Supercomputer in your bedroom
University of Sussex academics have established a method of turbocharging desktop PCs to give them the same capability as supercomputers worth tens of millions of pounds. (2021-02-02)

Turbulence model could enhance rotorcraft, munitions performance
Design of Army aerial vehicles and weapon systems relies on the ability to predict aerodynamic behavior, often aided by advanced computer simulations of the flow of air over the body. High-fidelity simulations assist engineers in maximizing how much load a rotorcraft can lift or how far a missile can fly, but these simulations aren't cheap. A new turbulence model could change that (2021-01-25)

Turbulence model could help design aircraft capable of handling extreme scenarios
To help build aircraft that can better handle violent turbulence, Purdue University researchers developed a new model that allows engineers to incorporate the physics of an entire vortex collision into their design codes. (2021-01-21)

OHIO researchers ID potential target for anti-viral drugs to battle COVID
This is a non-coding section of the RNA, which means that it is not translated into a protein, but it is likely key to the virus's replication. (2021-01-20)

Improving long-term climate calculations
Climate researchers have found a simple but efficient way to improve estimations of ultimate global warming from complex climate models. The finding is relevant for the evaluation and comparison of climate models and thus for accurate projections of future climate change - especially beyond the year 2100. (2021-01-19)

Compressive fluctuations heat ions in space plasma
New simulations carried out in part on the ATERUI II supercomputer in Japan have found that the reason ions exist at higher temperatures than electrons in space plasma is because they are better able to absorb energy from compressive turbulent fluctuations in the plasma. These finding have important implications for understanding observations of various astronomical objects such as the images of the accretion disk and shadow of the M87 supermassive black hole. (2020-12-18)

A smart ring shows it's possible to detect fever before you feel it
Advance could pave the way for early warning system on COVID-19 and flu using wearables. (2020-12-14)

Shrinking massive neural networks used to model language
Deep learning neural networks can be massive, demanding major computing power. In a test of the ''lottery ticket hypothesis,'' MIT researchers have found leaner, more efficient subnetworks hidden within BERT models. The discovery could make natural language processing more accessible. (2020-12-01)

Volcanic eruptions have more effect in summer
Modeling shows that volcanic eruptions can cause changes in global climate, if the timing is right. (2020-11-18)

Keep the data coming
A continuous data supply ensures data-intensive simulations can run at maximum speed. (2020-11-09)

Blue whirl flame structure revealed with supercomputers
Main structure and flow structure of 'blue whirl' flame revealed through supercomputer simulations. Flame simulations entailed four million CPU hours distributed over the Deepthought2 system from the University of Maryland; the Thunder system from the Air Force Research Laboratory; and Stampede2 of TACC allocated through NSF-funded XSEDE. Further research on blue whirls might help scientists develop ways to burn fuels more cleanly. (2020-11-09)

Final dance of unequal black hole partners
Lousto and James Healy (both of Rochester Institute of Technology) used the Frontera supercomputer to model for the first time a black hole merger of two black holes with very different sizes (128:1). The research required seven months of constant computation. The results, published in Physical Review Letters, predicts the gravitational waves such a merger would produce, as well as characteristics of the resulting merged black hole. (2020-11-06)

Hidden states of the COVID-19 spike protein
Computer modeling of the COVID-19 virus on supercomputers showed that the spike protein visits an intermediate state before it can dock to the receptor protein on the host cell membrane. This intermediate state can be useful for drug targeting to prevent the spike protein to initiate viral infection. The initial findings, which showed the existence of an intermediate semi-open state of the spike protein, was published in the Journal of Chemical Physics. (2020-10-21)

Targeting the shell of the Ebola virus
As the world grapples with COVID-19, the Ebola virus is again raging. A research team at University of Delaware is using supercomputers to simulate the inner workings of Ebola (as well as COVID-19), looking at how molecules move, atom by atom, to carry out their functions. Now, they have revealed structural features of the Ebola virus's protein shell to provide therapeutic targets to destabilize the virus and knock it out with an antiviral treatment. (2020-10-20)

First detailed look at how molecular Ferris wheel delivers protons to cellular factories
All cells with nuclei, from yeast to humans, use molecular machines called proton pumps to regulate the acidity of organelles - compartments where various types of work are done. A new study reveals a key step in how these Ferris wheel-like pumps operate. (2020-10-07)

Planet collision simulations give clues to atmospheric loss from Moon's origin
Earth could have lost anywhere between ten and 60 per cent of its atmosphere in the collision that is thought to have formed the Moon. (2020-09-29)

Engineers pre-train AI computers to make them even more powerful
Engineers at CSEM have developed a new machine-learning method that paves the way for artificial intelligence to be used in applications that until now have been deemed too sensitive. The method, which has been tested by running simulations on a climate-control system for a 100-room building, is poised to deliver energy savings of around 20%. (2020-09-22)

Zooming in on dark matter
Cosmologists have zoomed in on the smallest clumps of dark matter in a virtual universe - which could help us to find the real thing in space. (2020-09-02)

Researchers develop molecule to store solar energy
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed a molecule that absorbs energy from sunlight and stores it in chemical bonds. A possible long-term use of the molecule is to capture solar energy efficiently and store it for later consumption. The current results have been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, JACS. (2020-08-31)

2D materials for ultrascaled field-effect transistors
Since the discovery of graphene, two-dimensional materials have been the focus of materials research. Among other things, they could be used to build tiny, high-performance transistors. Researchers at ETH Zurich and EPF Lausanne have now simulated and evaluated one hundred possible materials for this purpose and discovered 13 promising candidates. (2020-08-17)

Busting Up the Infection Cycle of Hepatitis B
Researchers at the University of Delaware have gained new understanding of the virus that causes hepatitis B and the ''spiky ball'' that encloses its genetic blueprint. They looked at how the capsid--a protein shell that protects the blueprint and also drives the delivery of it to infect a host cell--assembles itself. The capsid is an important target in developing drugs to treat hepatitis B, a life-threatening and incurable infection that afflicts more than 250 million people worldwide. (2020-08-13)

Molecular additives enhance mechanical properties of organic solar cell material
Ganesh Balasubramanian, P.C. Rossin assistant professor of Mechanical Engineering & Mechanics at Lehigh University, and his graduate student Joydeep Munshi demonstrated that adding small molecules to a semiconducting polymer blend enhances the performance and stability of material used in organic solar cells. The study is described in an article, 'Elasto-morphology of P3HT:PCBM bulk heterojunction organic solar cells' featured on the back cover of Soft Matter. (2020-08-12)

Skoltech supercomputer helps scientists reveal most influential parameters for crop
Skoltech researchers have used the supercomputer to perform a very precise sensitivity analysis to reveal crucial parameters for different crop yields in the chernozem region of Russia, famous for its high-quality, fertile soil. Agricultural lands occupy 13 percent of the territory of Russia, droughts, dryness, humus reserves exhaustion are the major negative factor for national agriculture. Being able to simulate all possible variants, reveal the most crucial parameters without time-consuming and costly work is important. (2020-08-07)

Break it down: A new way to address common computing problem
A new algorithm developed in the lab of Jr-Shin Li at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis provides a framework for solving complex linear inverse problems that doesn't require a supercomputer and also enhances security and privacy. (2020-08-04)

Re-engineering antibodies for COVID-19
Catholic University of America researcher uses 'in silico' analysis to fast-track passive immunity (2020-07-30)

Computational gene study suggests new pathway for COVID-19 inflammatory response
A team led by Dan Jacobson of the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory used the Summit supercomputer at ORNL to analyze genes from cells in the lung fluid of nine COVID-19 patients compared with 40 control patients. (2020-07-28)

New learning algorithm should significantly expand the possible applications of AI
The e-prop learning method developed at Graz University of Technology forms the basis for drastically more energy-efficient hardware implementations of Artificial Intelligence. (2020-07-17)

USTC achieves million core parallel first-principles computing simulation on Sunway TaihuLight
USTC researchers have realized first-principles computing simulation of the large-scale solid system with tens of thousands of atoms and molecules based on DGDFT with the help of super large-scale millions of cores parallel computation on the supercomputer Sunway TaihuLight. (2020-07-17)

Supercomputer reveals atmospheric impact of gigantic planetary collisions
The giant impacts that dominate late stages of planet formation have a wide range of consequences for young planets and their atmospheres, according to new research. (2020-07-14)

Experiment confirms liquids show properties of solid bodies at microscopic scales
The collaborators are Kazan Federal University, Vereschagin Institute of High Pressure Physics (Russian Academy of Sciences), Queen Mary University of London, Imperial College London, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Wuhan University of Technology, and Sichuan University. (2020-07-13)

Artificial intelligence could revolutionize sea ice warnings
Today, large resources are used to provide vessels in the polar seas with warnings about the spread of sea ice. Artificial intelligence may make these warnings cheaper, faster, and available for everyone. (2020-06-18)

Quantum material research facilitates discovery of better materials that benefit our society
By means of the state-of-art quantum many-body simulations, performed on the world's fastest supercomputers, researchers from various institutions including the University of Hong Kong have achieved accurate model calculations for a rare-earth magnet TmMgGaO4 (TMGO). They found that the material, under the correct temperature regime, could realise the the long-sought-after two-dimensional topological Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) phase, which completed the pursuit of identifying the KT physics in quantum magnetic materials for half a century. (2020-06-16)

New research leads to lighter and greener bridges
A recently completed research project revealed the potential for reducing material used for a suspension bridge deck by more than 25 per cent -- meaning a saving of up to 30 per cent of CO2 emissions. (2020-06-03)

Supercomputer model simulations reveal cause of Neanderthal extinction
IBS climate scientists discover that according to new supercomputer model simulations, only competition between Neanderthals and Homo sapiens can explain the rapid demise of Neanderthals around 43 to 38 thousand years ago. (2020-05-20)

Variance in tree species results in the cleanest urban air
What kind of an effect do trees have on aerosol particle concentrations in cities? Modelling carried out at the University of Helsinki revealed that the air was cleanest on the street level with three rows of trees of variable height situated along boulevard-type city street canyons. (2020-05-07)

Shedding new light on nanolasers using 2D semiconductors
Cun-Zheng Ning, a professor of electrical engineering in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University, and collaborators from Tsinghua University in China discovered a process of physics that enables low-power nanolasers to be produced in 2D semiconductor materials. Understanding the physics behind lasers at nanoscale and how they interact with semiconductors can have major implications for high-speed communication channels for supercomputers and data centers. (2020-05-06)

Supercomputer simulations present potential active substances against coronavirus
Several drugs approved for treating hepatitis C viral infection were identified as potential candidates against COVID-19, a new disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. This is the result of research based on extensive calculations using the MOGON II supercomputer at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). (2020-05-05)

Understanding the diversity of cancer evolution based on computational simulation
Understanding the principles of cancer evolution is important in designing a therapeutic strategy. A research group at The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (IMSUT) announced a new simulation model that describes various modes of cancer evolution in a unified manner. (2020-04-30)

Supercomputers and Archimedes' law enable calculating nanobubble diffusion in nuclear fuel
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have proposed a method that speeds up the calculation of nanobubble diffusion in solid materials. This method makes it possible to create significantly more accurate fuel models for nuclear power plants. (2020-04-20)

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