Current Supercomputers News and Events

Current Supercomputers News and Events, Supercomputers News Articles.
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Story tips: Modeling COVID, permafrost lost and taking the heat
ORNL story tips: Modeling COVID, permafrost lost and taking the heat. (2021-02-16)

Supercomputer in your bedroom
University of Sussex academics have established a method of turbocharging desktop PCs to give them the same capability as supercomputers worth tens of millions of pounds. (2021-02-02)

Understanding how genetic motifs conduct "the music of life"
Our genetic codes control not only which proteins our cells produce, but also - to a great extent - in what quantity. This ground-breaking discovery, applicable to all biological life, was recently made by systems biologists at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, using supercomputers and artificial intelligence. Their research, which could also shed new light on the mysteries of cancer, was recently published in the scientific journal Nature Communications. (2021-01-28)

Simulating 800,000 years of California earthquake history to pinpoint risks
A new study presents a prototype Rate-State earthquake simulator that simulates hundreds of thousands of years of seismic history in California. Coupled with another code, the framework can calculate the amount of shaking that would occur for each quake. The new approach improves the ability to pinpoint how big an earthquake might occur in a given location, allowing building code developers and structural engineers to design more resilient buildings that can survive earthquakes. (2021-01-25)

Compressive fluctuations heat ions in space plasma
New simulations carried out in part on the ATERUI II supercomputer in Japan have found that the reason ions exist at higher temperatures than electrons in space plasma is because they are better able to absorb energy from compressive turbulent fluctuations in the plasma. These finding have important implications for understanding observations of various astronomical objects such as the images of the accretion disk and shadow of the M87 supermassive black hole. (2020-12-18)

Expect fewer, but more destructive landfalling tropical cyclones
A study based on new high-resolution supercomputer simulations, published in this week's issue of the journal Science Advances, reveals that global warming will intensify landfalling tropical cyclones of category 3 or higher in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, while suppressing the formation of weaker events. (2020-12-16)

UMBC team reveals possibilities of new one-atom-thick materials
New 2D materials have the potential to transform technologies, but they're expensive and difficult to synthesize. Researchers at UMBC used computer modeling to predict the properties of 2D materials that haven't yet been made in real life. These highly-accurate predictions show the possibility of materials whose properties could be ''tuned'' to make them more efficient than existing materials in particular applications. A separate paper demonstrated a way to integrate these materials into real electronic devices. (2020-12-14)

Confirming simulated calculations with experiment results
Dr Zi Yang MENG from Division of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Science, the University of Hong Kong (HKU), is pursuing a new paradigm of quantum material research that combines theory, computation and experiment in a coherent manner. Recently, he teamed up with Dr Wei LI from Beihang University, Professor Yang QI from Fudan University, Professor Weiqiang YU from Renmin University and Professor Jinsheng WEN from Nanjing University to untangle the puzzle of Nobel Prize-winning theory Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) phase. (2020-11-19)

No matter the size of a nuclear party, some protons and neutrons will pair up and dance
No matter the size of a nuclear party, certain protons and neutrons will always pair up and dance, a new MIT study finds. The results will help map the workings within neutron stars and heavy radioactive nuclei. (2020-11-09)

New black hole merger simulations could help power next-gen gravitational wave detectors
Rochester Institute of Technology scientists have developed new simulations of black holes with widely varying masses merging that could help power the next generation of gravitational wave detectors. RIT Professor Carlos Lousto and Research Associate James Healy from RIT's School of Mathematical Sciences outline these record-breaking simulations in a new Physical Review Letters paper. (2020-11-09)

Final dance of unequal black hole partners
Lousto and James Healy (both of Rochester Institute of Technology) used the Frontera supercomputer to model for the first time a black hole merger of two black holes with very different sizes (128:1). The research required seven months of constant computation. The results, published in Physical Review Letters, predicts the gravitational waves such a merger would produce, as well as characteristics of the resulting merged black hole. (2020-11-06)

For the first time: Realistic simulation of plasma edge instabilities in tokamaks
Among the loads to which the plasma vessel in a fusion device may be exposed, so-called edge localised modes are particularly undesirable. By computer simulations the origin and the course of this plasma-edge instability could now be explained for the first time in detail. (2020-10-22)

Targeting the shell of the Ebola virus
As the world grapples with COVID-19, the Ebola virus is again raging. A research team at University of Delaware is using supercomputers to simulate the inner workings of Ebola (as well as COVID-19), looking at how molecules move, atom by atom, to carry out their functions. Now, they have revealed structural features of the Ebola virus's protein shell to provide therapeutic targets to destabilize the virus and knock it out with an antiviral treatment. (2020-10-20)

AI used to show how hydrogen becomes a metal inside giant planets
Researchers have used a combination of AI and quantum mechanics to reveal how hydrogen gradually turns into a metal inside giant planets. (2020-09-09)

Foiling illicit cryptocurrency mining with artificial intelligence
Los Alamos National Laboratory computer scientists have developed a new artificial intelligence (AI) system that may be able to identify malicious codes that hijack supercomputers to mine for cryptocurrency such as Bitcoin and Monero. (2020-08-20)

Mathematical tool helps calculate properties of quantum materials more quickly
Many quantum materials have been nearly impossible to simulate mathematically because the computing time required is too long. Now a joint research group at Freie Universität Berlin and the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB, Germany) has demonstrated a way to considerably reduce the computing time. This could accelerate the development of materials for energy-efficient IT technologies of the future. (2020-08-14)

USTC achieves million core parallel first-principles computing simulation on Sunway TaihuLight
USTC researchers have realized first-principles computing simulation of the large-scale solid system with tens of thousands of atoms and molecules based on DGDFT with the help of super large-scale millions of cores parallel computation on the supercomputer Sunway TaihuLight. (2020-07-17)

Artificial intelligence could revolutionize sea ice warnings
Today, large resources are used to provide vessels in the polar seas with warnings about the spread of sea ice. Artificial intelligence may make these warnings cheaper, faster, and available for everyone. (2020-06-18)

KU Leuven researchers shed new light on solar flares
Plasma astrophysicists at KU Leuven have created the first self-consistent simulation of the physical processes that occur during a solar flare. The researchers used Flemish supercomputers and a new combination of physical models. (2020-06-18)

Geoscientists create deeper look at processes below Earth's surface with 3D images
Geoscientists at The University of Texas at Dallas recently used massive amounts of earthquake data and supercomputers to generate high-resolution, 3D images of the dynamic geological processes taking place far below the Earth's surface. In a study published April 29 in Nature Communications, the research team described how it created images of mantle flows in a subduction region under Central America and the Caribbean Sea. (2020-06-17)

Quantum material research facilitates discovery of better materials that benefit our society
By means of the state-of-art quantum many-body simulations, performed on the world's fastest supercomputers, researchers from various institutions including the University of Hong Kong have achieved accurate model calculations for a rare-earth magnet TmMgGaO4 (TMGO). They found that the material, under the correct temperature regime, could realise the the long-sought-after two-dimensional topological Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) phase, which completed the pursuit of identifying the KT physics in quantum magnetic materials for half a century. (2020-06-16)

Physicists document method to improve magnetoelectric response
University of Arkansas physicists have documented a method of improving the magnetoelectric response in bismuth ferrite, a discovery that could lead to faster and cheaper data storage and better electronic sensors. (2020-06-16)

Machine learning predicts nanoparticles' structure and dynamics
Researchers at the University of Jyväskylä in Finland have demonstrated that new distance-based machine learning methods are capable of predicting structures and atomic dynamics of nanoparticles reliably. The new methods are significantly faster than traditional simulation methods used for nanoparticle research and will facilitate more efficient explorations of particle-particle reactions and particles' functionality in their environment. The study was published in a Special Issue devoted to machine learning in The Journal of Physical Chemistry on May 15, 2020. (2020-06-09)

Engineers put tens of thousands of artificial brain synapses on a single chip
MIT engineers have designed a 'brain-on-a-chip,' smaller than a piece of confetti, that is made from tens of thousands of artificial brain synapses known as memristors -- silicon-based components that mimic the information-transmitting synapses in the human brain. (2020-06-08)

Researchers have developed a first-principles quantum Monte Carlo package called TurboRVB
'TurboRVB' is a first-principles quantum Monte Carlo software package developed by Prof. Sandro Sorella (SISSA/Italy) and his collaborators. Very recently, Assist. Prof. Kosuke Nakano at Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST/Japan) and his collaborators have published a review paper in The Journal of Chemical Physics [J. Chem. Phys. 152, 204121, 2020]. The published paper describes the details of the algorithms implemented in TurboRVB and summarizes its applications to date. (2020-06-01)

Across the cell membrane
Aquaporins and glucose transporters facilitate the movement of substances across biological membranes and are present in all kingdoms of life. University of Texas at San Antonio biophysicist Liao Chen uses the Frontera supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center to explore the atomic behavior of these proteins. His research suggests glucose transporters function by using a gate on the extracellular side that opens and closes based on body temperature. (2020-06-01)

Quantum leap: Photon discovery is a major step toward at-scale quantum technologies
A team of physicists at the University of Bristol has developed the first integrated photon source with the potential to deliver large-scale quantum photonics. The development of quantum technologies promises to have a profound impact across science, engineering and society. Quantum computers at scale will be able to solve problems intractable on even the most powerful current supercomputers, with many revolutionary applications, for example, in the design of new drugs and materials. (2020-05-20)

Graphene-reinforced carbon fiber may lead to affordable, stronger car materials
A new way of creating carbon fibers -- which are typically expensive to make -- could one day lead to using these lightweight, high-strength materials to improve safety and reduce the cost of producing cars, according to a team of researchers. Using a mix of computer simulations and laboratory experiments, the team found that adding small amounts of the 2D graphene to the production process both reduces the production cost and strengthens the fibers. (2020-05-18)

Hydrogen blamed for interfering with nickelate superconductors synthesis
Prof. ZHONG Zhicheng's team at the Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering has investigated the electronic structure of the recently discovered nickelate superconductors NdNiO2. They successfully explained the experimental difficulties in synthesizing superconducting nickelates, in cooperation with Prof. Karsten Held at Vienna University of Technology. (2020-05-08)

Using digital twins to design more sustainable cities
Over the past several years, a collaboration at HLRS has been developing a digital twin of Herrenberg, a small city just outside of Stuttgart, Germany. The Herrenberg study has already provided valuable information for city planners and government officials in the state of Baden-Württemberg, and paves the way for improving the model to include additional kinds of data. (2020-05-07)

Superconductivity: It's hydrogen's fault
Last summer, it was discovered that there are promising superconductors in a special class of materials, the so-called nickelates. However, it soon became apparent that these initially spectacular could not be reproduced by other research groups. TU Wien has now found the reason for this: In some nickelates additional hydrogen atoms are incorporated into the material structure. This changes the electrical behaviour of the material. (2020-04-27)

New high-energy-density physics research provides insights about the universe
Researchers at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics have applied physics theory and calculations to predict the presence of two new phenomena -- interspecies radiative transition (IRT) and the breakdown of the dipole selection rule--in the transport of radiation in atoms and molecules under high-energy-density (HED) conditions. The research enhances an understanding of HED science and could lead to more information about how stars and other astrophysical objects evolve in the universe. (2020-04-24)

Hungry galaxies grow fat on the flesh of their neighbours
Galaxies grow large by eating their smaller neighbours, new research reveals. Exactly how massive galaxies attain their size is poorly understood, not least because they swell over billions of years. But now a combination of observation and modelling from researchers led by Dr Anshu Gupta from Australia's ARC Centre of Excellence for All Sky Astrophysics in 3 Dimensions (ASTRO 3D) has provided a vital clue. (2020-04-22)

Dissecting the mechanism of protein unfolding by SDS
A new study by the Aksimentiev group at the University of Illinois has used molecular dynamics simulations to understand how sodium dodecyl sulfate, a commonly used detergent in labs, induces protein folding. Their results were published in the journal Nanoscale. (2020-04-17)

Supercomputers drive ion transport research
Kinetics of solute transport through nanoporous membranes captured through supercomputer simulations. Advanced path sampling techniques and molecular dynamics simulations performed on XSEDE-allocated Stampede2 system at TACC. Science team identified previously unknown mechanism for ion transport through nanopores, induced charge anisotropy. Research could help make progress in water desalination; decontaminating the environment; better pharmaceuticals, and more. (2020-03-04)

Computer-based weather forecast: New algorithm outperforms mainframe computer systems
The exponential growth in computer processing power seen over the past 60 years may soon come to a halt. Complex systems such as those used in weather forecast, for example, require high computing capacities, but the costs for running supercomputers to process large quantities of data can become a limiting factor. German and Swiss researchers have recently unveiled an algorithm that can solve complex problems with remarkable facility -- even on a personal computer. (2020-02-13)

Closely spaced hydrogen atoms could facilitate superconductivity in ambient conditions
An international team of researchers discovered the hydrogen atoms in a common metal hydride material are much more tightly spaced than had been predicted for decades--a feature that could possibly facilitate superconductivity at or near room temperature and pressure. The scientists conducted neutron scattering experiments at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory on samples of zirconium vanadium hydride. (2020-02-03)

Scientists invent a new method of generating intense short UV vortices
An international group of scientists, including Skoltech Professor Sergey Rykovanov, has found a way to generate intense 'twisted' pulses. The vortices discovered by the scientists will help investigate new materials. The results of their study were published in the prestigious journal, Nature Communications. (2020-01-23)

Machine learning greatly reduces uncertainty in understanding of paleozoic biodiversity
Previous analyses of global paleobiodiversity have been coarsely resolved to roughly 10 million years, obscuring the effects of ecological processes and events that operate at shorter timescales. (2020-01-16)

Reducing the risk of blood clots in artificial heart valves
People with mechanical heart valves need blood thinners on a daily basis, because they have a higher risk of blood clots and stroke. Researchers at the ARTORG Center of the University of Bern, Switzerland, now identified the root cause of blood turbulence leading to clotting. Design optimization could greatly reduce the risk of clotting and enable these patients to live without life-long medication. (2020-01-13)

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