Current Superconductivity News and Events

Current Superconductivity News and Events, Superconductivity News Articles.
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New way to control electrical charge in 2D materials: Put a flake on it
Gaining control of the flow of electrical current through atomically thin materials is important to potential future applications in photovoltaics or computing. Physicists in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis have discovered one way to locally add electrical charge to a graphene device. (2021-01-14)

Scientists have synthesized an unusual superconducting barium superhydride
A new exotic compound, BaH12, has been discovered by experiment and theory. Unusually, it is a molecular metal and demonstrates the superconducting transition around 20?K at 140?GPa (2021-01-12)

Transition metal 'cocktail' helps make brand new superconductors
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University mixed and designed a new, high entropy alloy (HEA) superconductor, using extensive data on simple superconducting substances with a specific crystal structure. HEAs are known to preserve superconducting characteristics up to extremely high pressures. The new superconductor, Co0.2Ni0.1Cu0.1Rh0.3Ir0.3Zr2, has a superconducting transition at 8K, a relatively high temperature for an HEA. (2021-01-09)

Ultra-thin designer materials unlock quantum phenomena
New research, published in Nature, has measured highly sought-after Majorana quantum states (2020-12-17)

Machine learning boosts the search for 'superhard' materials
Superhard materials are in high demand in industry, from energy production to aerospace, but finding suitable new materials has largely been a matter of trial and error based on classical materials such as diamonds. Now researchers have reported a machine learning model that can accurately predict the hardness of new materials, allowing scientists to more readily find compounds suitable for use in a variety of applications. (2020-12-17)

Scientists discover a new complex europium hydride
A team of researchers from Russia, the United States, and China led by Skoltech Professor Artem R. Oganov has discovered an unexpected very complex europium hydride, Eu8H46. Although devoid of superconductivity, europium hydrides are very interesting in view of chemical anomalies that make europium different from other rare-earth atoms. (2020-12-15)

'Magic' angle graphene and the creation of unexpected topological quantum states
Electrons inhabit a strange and topsy-turvy world. These infinitesimally small particles have never ceased to amaze and mystify despite the more than a century that scientists have studied them. Now, in an even more amazing twist, physicists have discovered that, under certain conditions, interacting electrons can create what are called ''topological quantum states.'' This finding, recently published in the journal Nature, has implications for many technological fields of study, especially information technology. (2020-12-14)

Quantum mysteries: Probing an unusual state in the superconductor-insulator transition
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology approach the two decade-old mystery of why an anomalous metallic state appears in the superconductor-insulator transition in 2D superconductors. Through experimental measurements of a thermoelectric effect, they found that the ''quantum liquid state'' of quantum vortices causes the anomalous metallic state. The results clarify the nature of the transition and could help in the design of superconducting devices for quantum computers. (2020-12-14)

Progress in electronic structure and topology in nickelates superconductors
Recently, superconductivity was discovered in the hole-doped nickelates, wh ich provide us a new platform to study the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity. Researchers in IOP, CAS, investigated the electronic structure and band topology in this series of compounds carefully, and constructed a simplest two-band model. Besides, a pair of Dirac points are proposed below the Fermi level. After band renormalization by using DFT+Gutzwiller method, the Dirac points become quite closer to the Fermi level. (2020-11-24)

UCF researcher zeroes in on critical point for improving superconductors
Developing a practical ''room temperature'' superconductor is a feat science has yet to achieve. However a UCF researcher and his colleagues are working to move this goal closer to realization by taking a closer look at what is happening in ''strange'' metals. The research was published recently in the journal Communications Physics - Nature. (2020-11-23)

UT researchers establish proof of principle in superconductor study
Three physicists in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, together with their colleagues from the Southern University of Science and Technology and Sun Yat-sen University in China, have successfully modified a semiconductor to create a superconductor, which may lead to unforeseen advancements in technology. (2020-11-18)

CCNY & partners in quantum algorithm breakthrough
Researchers led by City College of New York physicist Pouyan Ghaemi report the development of a quantum algorithm with the potential to study a class of many-electron quantums system using quantum computers. Their paper, entitled ''Creating and Manipulating a Laughlin-Type ν=1/3 Fractional Quantum Hall State on a Quantum Computer with Linear Depth Circuits,'' appears in the December issue of PRX Quantum, a journal of the American Physical Society. (2020-11-13)

Time for a new state of matter in high-temperature superconductors
Scientists from Universität Hamburg have pointed out how to create a time crystal in an intriguing class of materials, the high-temperature superconductors. They propose to drive these superconducting materials into a time crystalline state by inducing Higgs excitations via light. The work is reported in the journal Physical Review Research. (2020-11-12)

The transformation of a pair: How electrons supertransport current in 'bad metals'
The repulsive forces between the electrons in bad metals are much stronger than in low-temperature superconductors: so how do particles with the same charge overcome these forces and manage to pair-up and to transport current as it happens in ''traditional'' superconductors? According to a new study, in these materials the electrons would transform into new ''objects'', with an unprecedented character that would allow them to superconduct the current. (2020-11-11)

Connecting two classes of unconventional superconductors
The understanding of unconventional superconductivity is one of the most challenging and fascinating tasks of solid-state physics. Different classes of unconventional superconductors share that superconductivity emerges near a magnetic phase despite the underlying physics is different. (2020-11-11)

Making 3D nanosuperconductors with DNA
A platform for making 3D superconducting nano-architectures with a prescribed organization could find application in quantum computing and sensing. (2020-11-10)

New kind of superconductivity discovered
Superconductivity is a phenomenon where an electric circuit loses its resistance and becomes extremely efficient under certain conditions. There are different ways in which this can happen which were thought to be incompatible. For the first time researchers discover a bridge between two of these methods to achieve superconductivity. This new knowledge could lead to a more general understanding of the phenomena, and one day to applications. (2020-11-06)

Implantable device can monitor and treat heart disease
Cunjiang Yu, Bill D. Cook Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at UH, led a group of researchers that has reported developing a cardiac patch made from fully rubbery electronics that can be placed directly on the heart to collect electrophysiological activity, temperature, heartbeat and other indicators, all at the same time. (2020-11-03)

Tailoring 2D materials to improve electronic and optical devices
New possibilities for future developments in electronic and optical devices have been unlocked by recent advancements in two-dimensional (2D) materials, according to Penn State researchers. (2020-10-27)

Kitchen temperature supercurrents from stacked 2D materials
A 'stack' of 2D materials could allow for supercurrents at ground-breakingly warm temperatures, easily achievable in the household kitchen. An international study published in August opens a new route to high-temperature supercurrents -- at temperatures, as 'warm' as inside your kitchen fridge. (Previously, superconductivity has been difficult even at temperatures as low as -170°C, making superconductivity impractical for many of its most exciting applications.) (2020-10-20)

Rochester researchers synthesize room temperature superconducting material
Compressing simple molecular solids with hydrogen at extremely high pressures, University of Rochester scientists have, for the first time, created material that is superconducting at room temperature. Featured as the cover story in Nature, the work was conducted by the lab of Ranga Dias. His research team combined hydrogen with carbon and sulfur to photochemically synthesize simple organic-derived carbonaceous sulfur hydride in a diamond anvil cell. (2020-10-14)

UNLV and University of Rochester physicists observe room-temperature superconductivity
Physicists from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and the University of Rochester have made a breakthrough in the long sought-after quest for a room-temperature superconductor, what they call the ''holy grail'' of energy efficiency. (2020-10-14)

Diamonds are a quantum scientist's best friend
New research details the phenomenon of what is called ''triplet superconductivity'' in diamond. Triplet superconductivity occurs when electrons move in a composite spin state rather than as a single pair. This is an extremely rare, yet efficient form of superconductivity that until now has only been known to occur in one or two other materials, and only theoretically in diamonds. (2020-10-07)

Experiments with twisted 2D materials catch electrons behaving collectively
A team led by the University of Washington reports that carefully constructed stacks of graphene -- a 2D form of carbon -- can exhibit highly correlated electron properties. The team also found evidence that this type of collective behavior likely relates to the emergence of exotic magnetic states. (2020-10-06)

Researchers identify new type of superconductor
Until now, the history of superconducting materials has been a tale of two types: s-wave and d-wave. Now, Cornell researchers - led by Brad Ramshaw, the Dick & Dale Reis Johnson Assistant Professor in the College of Arts and Sciences - have discovered a possible third type: g-wave. (2020-09-21)

Medical robotic hand? Rubbery semiconductor makes it possible
A medical robotic hand could allow doctors to more accurately diagnose and treat people from halfway around the world, but currently available technologies aren't good enough to match the in-person experience. Now researchers have reported that they have designed and produced a smart electronic skin and a medical robotic hand capable of assessing vital diagnostic data by using a newly invented rubbery semiconductor. (2020-09-16)

Superconductors are super resilient to magnetic fields
A Professor at the University of Tsukuba provides a new theoretical mechanism that explains the ability of superconductive materials to bounce back from being exposed to a magnetic field. This work may lead to energy systems that operate without resistive losses. It is also useful for building qubits for quantum computers. (2020-09-10)

Inexpensive, non-toxic nanofluid could be a game-changer for oil recovery
Researchers from the University of Houston have demonstrated that an inexpensive and non-toxic nanofluid can be used to efficiently recover even heavy oil with high viscosity from reservoirs. (2020-09-10)

Electric current is manipulated by light in an organic superconductor
A polarized petahertz current is driven by an ultrashort laser in an organic superconductor. This is contrast to the common sense which is justified by Ohm's law, i.e., a net current cannot be induced by an oscillating electric field of light. The current enhances near the superconducting transition temperature. The light-driven petahertz current opens a way to high-speed operation of computers which is one million times faster than the conventional ones. (2020-09-04)

Editors' Choice in Science: an unusual superconductor
Professor Wang Jian at Peking University and collaborators observed the experimental evidence of anomalous metallic state and detected type-II Ising superconductivity existing in centrosymmetric systems. (2020-09-02)

A topography of extremes
An international team of scientists from Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, and colleagues from the USA and Switzerland have successfully combined various extreme experimental conditions in a unique way, revealing exciting insights into the conducting properties of the crystalline metal CeRhIn5. In Nature Communications, they report on their exploration of previously uncharted regions of the metal´s phase diagram, which is considered a promising model system for understanding unconventional superconductors. (2020-08-27)

New superlattice by CCNY team could lead to sustainable quantum electronics
A team of international physicists led by Lia Krusin-Elbaum of the City College of New York, has created a new topological magnetic superlattice material, that at a high temperature can conduct electrical current without dissipation and lost energy. The finding, detailed in a paper published in ''Nature Physics,'' could be the basis of research leading to an entire new quantum materials class that can potentially provide a platform for error-free quantum computing. (2020-08-17)

New advance in superconductors with 'twist' in rhombohedral graphite
An international research team led by The University of Manchester has revealed a nanomaterial that mirrors the 'magic angle' effect originally found in a complex man-made structure known as twisted bilayer graphene -- a key area of study in physics in recent years. (2020-08-12)

When Dirac meets frustrated magnetism
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics have discovered one of the largest anomalous Hall effects (15,506 siemens per centimeter at 2 Kelvin) ever observed in the new compound, KV3Sb5. This material has a never-before-seen combination of properties: Dirac physics, frustrated magnetism, 2D exfoliatability, and chemical stability. Aside from future fundamental research studying the interplay of these ingredients, the unique combination has potential for next-generation computing technologies like spintronics and quantum computing. (2020-07-31)

Physicists find misaligned carbon sheets yield unparalleled properties
A material composed of two one-atom-thick layers of carbon has grabbed the attention of physicists worldwide for its intriguing -- and potentially exploitable -- conductive properties. University of Texas at Dallas physicists are studying how the ability of twisted bilayer graphene to conduct electrical current changes in response to mid-infrared light. (2020-07-31)

Phillips group exactly solves experimental puzzle in high temperature superconductivity
A team of theoretical physicists at the Institute for Condensed Matter Theory (ICMT) in the Department of Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, led by Illinois Physics Professor Philip Phillips, has for the first time exactly solved a representative model of the cuprate problem, the 1992 Hatsugai-Kohmoto (HK) model of a doped Mott insulator. The team has published its findings online in the journal Nature Physics on July 27, 2020. (2020-07-29)

Room temperature superconductivity creeping toward possibility
The possibility of achieving room temperature superconductivity took a tiny step forward with a recent discovery by a team of Penn State physicists and materials scientists. (2020-07-29)

Contest between superconductivity and insulating states in Magic Angle Graphene
A team of ICFO researchers, in collaboration with scientists from MIT, NIMS (Japan), and Imperial College London, develop a set of entirely novel knobs to control correlated electrons and demonstrate that superconductivity can exist without insulating phases in Magic Angle Twisted Bi-layer Graphene. The study has been published in Nature. (2020-07-07)

Researchers create air filter that can kill the coronavirus
Researchers from the University of Houston, in collaboration with others, have designed a ''catch and kill'' air filter that can trap the virus responsible for COVID-19, killing it instantly. (2020-07-07)

A 'breath of nothing' provides a new perspective on superconductivity
Zero electrical resistance at room temperature? A material with this property, i.e. a room temperature superconductor, could revolutionize power distribution. But so far, the origin of superconductivity at high temperature is only incompletely understood. Scientists from Universität Hamburg and the Cluster of Excellence 'CUI: Advanced Imaging of Matter' have succeeded in observing strong evidence of superfluidity in a central model system, a two-dimensional gas cloud for the first time. (2020-07-06)

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