Current Supermarkets News and Events

Current Supermarkets News and Events, Supermarkets News Articles.
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First COVID-19 lockdown cost UK hospitality and high street £45 billion in turnover, researchers estimate
However, UK supermarkets and online retailers made an additional £4 billion each thanks to the coronavirus lockdown that began in March last year, according to recent estimates. (2021-02-18)

Food waste researcher: We must learn that brown fruit isn't bad fruit
We tend to avoid choosing apples with brown spots, assuming that they taste bad. But if we are to end food waste, we'll need to upend that assumption. UCPH researcher emphasizes that there's nothing wrong with oddly shaped or bruised apples. (2021-02-08)

Speaking and listening seem more difficult in a masked world, but people are adapting
People are adapting to speaking from behind, and understanding others who are wearing, a cloth face mask, University of California, Davis, researchers suggest in a new study. (2021-02-02)

US fishing and seafood industries saw broad declines last summer due to COVID-19
The US fishing and seafood sector years generated more than $200 billion in annual sales and supported 1.7 million jobs in recent years. It experienced broad declines in 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 public health crisis, according to a new NOAA Fisheries analysis released today. (2021-01-15)

The most consumed species of mussels contain microplastics all around the world
''If you eat mussels, you eat microplastics.'' This was already known to a limited extent about mussels from individual ocean regions. A new study by the University of Bayreuth reveals that this claim holds true globally. (2020-12-17)

What makes peppers blush
Bright red, tasty and healthy, that's how we know and love bell peppers. In a first, the team headed by Professor Sacha Baginsky from the Chair for Plant Biochemistry at Ruhr University (RUB) has deciphered in detail at the protein level what makes them turn red as they ripen. At the heart of the project are the so-called plastids, typical plant cell organelles in which chlorophyll is broken down and carotenoids are produced as the fruit ripens. (2020-12-14)

Kids gain weight when new convenience stores open nearby
A new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, found that changes in the food environment around low-income and high-ethnic/racial minority populations over time impact childhood obesity. Increased availability of small grocery stores selling a selection of healthy items in close proximity to children's homes improves their weight status over time, whereas increased availability of convenience stores selling predominantly unhealthy foods is likely to be detrimental. (2020-12-10)

Food health star ratings can improve diets, study finds
More evidence has emerged that food labelling can encourage manufacturers to improve product nutrition, but University of Melbourne experts say the star labelling system must be compulsory to make a big difference. (2020-11-20)

Physical distancing polices not enough to protect lower-income people: BU study
A new Boston University School of Public Health study of the first four months of America's coronavirus epidemic, published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, shows that physical distancing (also called ''social distancing'') policies had little effect on lower income people still needing to leave their homes to go to work--but does show them staying home when they could. (2020-11-06)

The Lancet Planetary Health: Restricting supermarket promotions of high-sugar food and drinks reduces sales without reducing store profits
Restricting the promotion and merchandising of unhealthy foods and beverages leads to a reduction in their sales, presenting an opportunity to improve people's diets, according to a randomised controlled trial of 20 stores in remote regions of Australia published in The Lancet Planetary Health journal. (2020-10-07)

Post-pandemic brave new world of agriculture
Recent events have shown how vulnerable the meat processing industry is to COVID-19. Professor Robert Henry says reducing risk of spreading infection in a future pandemic will require automation. But is the public ready for robots slaughtering and eviscerating animals to reduce the risk of infectious disease? And while there is ongoing resistance to GMOs and gene edited foods, Professor Henry says governments need policies to support these technologies, to safeguard regionally-based future food production. (2020-07-29)

Women's burden increases in COVID-19 era
The triple burden endured by women -- in productive, reproductive and community roles -- has been exposed and intensified due to COVID-19-enforced lockdown and quarantine restrictions. (2020-07-21)

COVID-19: The downside of social distancing
When faced with danger, humans draw closer together. Social distancing thwarts this impulse. Professor Ophelia Deroy from Ludwigs-Maximilians Universitaet in Munich (LMU) and colleagues argue that this dilemma poses a greater threat to society than overtly antisocial behavior. (2020-04-24)

Study reveals raw-type dog foods as a major source of multidrug-resistant bacteria that could potentially colonize humans
New research due to be presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) reveals that raw-type dog foods contain high levels of multidrug-resistant bacteria, including those resistant to last-line antibiotics. The potential transfer of such bacteria between dogs and humans is an international public health risk. (2020-04-19)

Healthy climate news: Fava beans could replace soy
The end of soy as a protein substitute? Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have found a way to make protein powder using fava beans -- a far more climate-friendly alternative. (2020-04-16)

Endangered species on supermarket shelves
Imagine purchasing products from your local grocer, only to find out that those products are comprised of critically endangered species! That's what a team from the University of Hong Kong, Division of Ecology and Biodiversity has recently discovered on Hong Kong supermarket shelves. A team led by Dr David Baker from the University's Conservation Forensics laboratory, has recently published the results from an investigation into European eel products on sale in Hong Kong supermarkets. (2020-03-06)

Sugar gets the red light from consumers in new study
Researchers have found that sugar content is the most important factor for people when making healthy food choices -- overriding fat and salt. (2020-02-28)

Insufficient evidence backing herbal medicines for weight loss
Researchers from the University of Sydney have conducted the first global review of herbal medicines for weight loss in 19 years, finding insufficient evidence to recommend any current treatments. (2020-02-17)

Kids rice snacks in Australia contain arsenic above EU guidelines: Study
Three out of four rice-based products tested have concentrations of arsenic that exceed the EU guideline for safe rice consumption for babies and toddlers. The research used European guidelines because Australia does not have safety standards specifically for children. (2020-01-21)

Most meat eaters support veganism as 'ethical' and good for the environment
A new survey of 1000 meat eaters finds support for the principles of veganism, but suggests most think it is inconvenient, expensive and a sacrifice in terms of taste. (2020-01-08)

Families of children with autism face physical, mental and social burdens
Families of children with autism face high physical, mental and emotional burdens, are sometimes ridiculed and even accused of child abuse, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-01-06)

Maximizing bike-share ridership: New research says it's all about location
The popularity of bike-share systems has grown in popularity thanks to the younger, more environmentally conscious generation. While they have garnered considerable attention in cities from Paris to Washington, D.C., their promise of urban transformation is far from being fully realized. (2020-01-06)

APS tip sheet: Modeling supermarket traffic jams
Modeling supermarket layouts could help reduce aisle congestion. (2019-12-18)

More than 1 in 3 low- and middle-income countries face both extremes of malnutrition
Being undernourished or overweight are no longer separate public health issues. The first paper in a four-paper report to be published in The Lancet details how more than one in three low- and middle-income countries face both extremes of malnutrition -- a reality driven by the modern food system. (2019-12-15)

Labelling foods with physical activity needed to burn calories linked to healthier choices
Labelling food and drink with the amount and type of exercise needed to burn off the calories in it might be a more effective way of encouraging people to make 'healthier' dietary choices, indicates research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. (2019-12-10)

Supermarkets and child nutrition in Africa
Hunger and undernutrition are widespread problems in Africa. At the same time, overweight, obesity, and related chronic diseases are also on the rise. Recent research suggested that the growth of supermarkets contributes to obesity in Africa. However, previous studies looked at data from adults. New research shows that supermarkets are not linked to obesity in children, instead contributing to a reduction in child undernutrition. The results were recently published in the journal Global Food Security. (2019-12-02)

Study: To encourage healthy eating, focus on mobile produce and farmers markets
A UBuffalo Ph.D. student conducted a literature review of studies on new mobile produce markets, farmers markets and grocery stores, and how each affected a key outcome: Increasing produce consumption in under-resourced neighborhoods. (2019-10-30)

Salt shakers should carry tobacco-style health warning, say experts
Salt sold in supermarkets and salt shakers in restaurants should be required to carry a front-of-pack, tobacco-style health warning, according to The World Hypertension League and leading international health organisations. (2019-09-27)

Many patients not receiving first-line treatment for sinus, throat, ear infections
Investigators have now shown that only half of patients presenting with sinus, throat, or ear infections at different treatment centers received the recommended first-line antibiotics, well below the industry standard of 80 percent. (2019-09-25)

British food crowned the healthiest in major global survey
It turns out that British food isn't that terrible, after all. A global survey has found that when it comes to having the healthiest packaged foods and drinks, the UK tops the charts, with the USA in 2nd place and Australia coming in at 3rd. (2019-08-20)

Fast-food availability near commute route linked to BMI
In a study of commuting workers, the number of different types of food stores available near residences and commute routes -- but not near workplaces -- had a significant association with body mass index (BMI). Adriana Dornelles of Arizona State University, US presents these findings in the open access journal PLOS ONE on Aug. 7, 2019. (2019-08-07)

A first bad apple spoils the bunch
People are more likely to judge the performance of a group based on member's that are labelled as first or number one than they are on any other member, according to new research led by Cass Business School academic Dr Janina Steinmetz. (2019-07-30)

Research shows black plastics could create renewable energy
New study looks at how plastics can be recycled and could help reduce plastic waste. (2019-07-16)

Toxic substances found in the glass and decoration of alcoholic beverage bottles
New research by the University of Plymouth shows that bottles of beer, wine and spirits contain potentially harmful levels of toxic elements, such as lead and cadmium, in their enamelled decorations. (2019-06-28)

Natural ingredients in supplements, nutraceuticals get a new type of barcode
Increasingly, shoppers are choosing nutraceuticals, cosmetics and herbal remedies with natural ingredients, and these products are readily available in many drug stores and supermarkets. But some consumers, health professionals and policy makers have raised concerns about the safety, quality and effectiveness of some of these health products. Now, researchers in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have developed a method to authenticate botanical ingredients by giving them each a unique 'chemical barcode.' (2019-06-26)

Goat milk kefir is proven to be good for your health
A University of Cordoba research team, for the first time, applied a protein identification technique to this product on a massive scale and found activity of healthy compounds (2019-06-25)

Online shopping interventions may help customers buy healthier foods
Altering the default order in which foods are shown on the screen, or offering substitutes lower in saturated fat could help customers make healthier choices when shopping for food online, according to a study published in the open access International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. (2019-06-14)

Food access near schools and homes illuminated for children in New York city
A study of nearly 800,000 schoolchildren in New York City shows that Black, Hispanic, and Asian students live and go to school closer to both healthy and unhealthy food outlets than do White students. Brian Elbel of the New York University School of Medicine and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. (2019-06-12)

Food freshness sensors could replace 'use-by' dates to cut food waste
Imperial academics have developed low-cost, smartphone-linked, eco-friendly spoilage sensors for meat and fish packaging. (2019-06-05)

Philadelphia's sweetened drink sales drop 38% after beverage tax
One year after Philadelphia passed its beverage tax, sales of sugary and artificially sweetened beverages dropped by 38% in chain food retailers, according to Penn Medicine researchers who conducted one of the largest studies examining the impacts of a beverage tax. The results, published this week in JAMA, translate to almost one billion fewer ounces of sugary or artificially sweetened beverages -- about 83 million cans of soda -- purchased in the Philadelphia area. (2019-05-14)

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