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Current Synthetic Biology News and Events, Synthetic Biology News Articles.
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Study of elephant, capybara, human hair finds that thicker hair isn't always stronger
Despite being four times thicker than human hair, elephant hair is only half as strong -- that's just one finding from researchers studying the hair strength of many different mammals. (2019-12-11)
Regional trends in overdose deaths reveal multiple opioid epidemics, according to new study
A recently published study shows the United States in the grip of several simultaneously occurring opioid epidemics, rather than just a single crisis. (2019-12-09)
Insilico publishes a review of deep aging clocks and announces the issuance of key patent
Insilico Medicine announced the publication of a comprehensive review of the deep biomarkers of aging and the publication of a granted patent titled 'Deep transcriptomic markers of human biological aging and methods of determining a biological aging clock.' (2019-12-05)
New remote-controlled 'smart' platform helps in cardiovascular disease treatment
A joint research group led by Dr. DU Xuemin at the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently demonstrated a remote-controlled 'smart' platform that effectively directs programmed vascular endothelium remodeling in a temporally controllable manner. (2019-12-03)
Two chiral catalysts working hand in hand
The stereoisomers of a molecule can cause different effects in a biological system, which is important for the development of drugs. (2019-12-03)
Cell-free synthetic biology comes of age
In a review paper published in Nature Reviews Genetics, Professor Michael Jewett explores how cell-free gene expression stands to help the field of synthetic biology dramatically impact society, from the environment to medicine to education. (2019-12-02)
Research enables artificial intelligence approach to create AAV capsids for gene therapies
Dyno Therapeutics announces a publication in Science demonstrating the power of a comprehensive machine-guided approach to improve adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsids for gene therapies. (2019-11-28)
Harvard Wyss Institute researchers demonstrate machine-guided engineering of AAV capsids
Taking a more systematic approach to the capsid protein-engineering problem, Harvard researchers mutated one by one each of the 735 amino acids within the AAV2 capsid, the best-known member of the AAV family, including all possible codon substitutions, insertions and deletions at each position. (2019-11-28)
Researchers create 'smart' surfaces to help blood-vessel grafts knit better, more safely
Researchers at McMaster University have created a new coating to prevent clotting and infection in synthetic vascular grafts, while also accelerating the body's own process for integrating the grafted vessels. (2019-11-27)
Laboratory-evolved bacteria switch to consuming CO2 for growth
Over the course of several months, researchers in Israel created Escherichia coli strains that consume CO2 for energy instead of organic compounds. (2019-11-27)
New vaccine will stop the spread of bovine TB
Scientists at the University of Surrey have developed a novel vaccine and complementary skin test to protect cattle against bovine tuberculosis (bovine TB). (2019-11-27)
A nice reactive ring to it: New synthetic pathways for diverse aromatic compounds
Researchers at the Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) published a new method for synthesizing γ?aryl-β-ketoesters, which are used in the pharmaceutical manufacturing to create many drug molecules that contain a multi-substituted aromatic framework. (2019-11-27)
Investigators narrow in on a microRNA for treating multiple sclerosis
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have discovered a microRNA -- a small RNA molecule -- that increases during peak disease in a mouse model of MS and in untreated MS patients. (2019-11-26)
Scientists develop electrochemical platform for cell-free synthetic biology
Scientists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and Arizona State University (ASU) have developed the first direct gene circuit to electrode interface by combining cell-free synthetic biology with state-of-the-art nanostructured electrodes. (2019-11-25)
Building better bacteriophage to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria
Researchers are pursuing engineered bacteriophage as alternatives to antibiotics to infect and kill multi-drug resistant bacteria. (2019-11-21)
The first high-speed straight motion of magnetic skyrmion at room temperature demonstrated
Researchers at Tohoku University have, for the first time, successfully demonstrated a formation and current-induced motion of synthetic antiferromagnetic magnetic skyrmions. (2019-11-19)
Army project may lead to new class of high-performance materials
Synthetic biologists working on a U.S. Army project have developed a process that could lead to a new class of synthetic polymers that may create new high-performance materials and therapeutics for Soldiers. (2019-11-18)
Discovery: New biomarker for cancer stem cells
A University of Houston College of Pharmacy associate professor has discovered a new biomarker in cancer stem cells that govern cancer survival and spread, and it's raising hope that drug discovery to kill cancer stem cells could follow suit. (2019-11-13)
Getting glued in the sea
New bio-inspired hydrogels can act like superglue in highly ionic environments such as seawater, overcoming issues in currently available marine adhesives. (2019-11-12)
Lab in hollow MOF capsules beyond integration of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis
It remains significant challenges to ideally combine the strengths of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis without compromise in a single catalyst. (2019-11-06)
Electrochemistry amps up in pharma
Sparked by several high-profile reports, electrochemistry -- using electricity to perform chemical reactions like oxidation and reduction -- is gaining popularity in the pharmaceutical field. (2019-11-06)
CBD, THC use during early pregnancy can disrupt fetal development
A new study published in Scientific Reports, a Nature Research journal, shows how a one-time exposure during early pregnancy to cannabinoids (CBs) -- both synthetic and natural -- can cause growth issues in a developing embryo. (2019-11-05)
Synthetic phages with programmable specificity
ETH researchers are using synthetic biology to reprogram bacterial viruses -- commonly known as bacteriophages -- to expand their natural host range. (2019-11-04)
Gene-OFF switches tool up synthetic biology
Wyss researchers and their colloaborators have developed two types of programmable repressor elements that can switch off the production of an output protein in synthetic biology circuits by up to 300-fold in response to almost any triggering nucleotide sequence. (2019-11-04)
New approach uses light to stabilize proteins for study
Researchers report they have developed a new technique that uses light to control the lifetime of a protein inside the cell. (2019-11-04)
New database enhances genomics research collaboration
Sharing datasets that reveal the function of genomic variants in health and disease has become easier, with the launch of a new, open-source database developed by Australian and North American researchers. (2019-11-03)
1,100 plants examined in massive, 9-year genomic diversity study
A new study published in Nature traces the genetic histories of the last billion years of plant life on Earth. (2019-10-31)
World first on-the-spot test for synthetic drug 'spice' developed at University of Bath
A simple saliva test to detect if someone has recently taken the street drug ''spice'' has been developed at the University of Bath - the first such test ever created. (2019-10-30)
Researchers describe how Vitamin E works in plants under extreme conditions
Vitamin E is a strong antioxidant that could act as a sentinel in plants, sending molecular signs from chloroplast -- a cell organ -- to the nucleus under extreme environmental conditions. (2019-10-30)
Scientists invent animal-free testing of lethal neurotoxins
Animal testing will no longer be required to assess a group of deadly neurotoxins, thanks to University of Queensland-led research. (2019-10-29)
Let there be...a new light
Light is the fastest way to distinguish right- and left-handed chiral molecules, which has important applications in chemistry and biology. (2019-10-28)
A new drought-protective small molecule 'drug' for crops
Using a structure-guided approach to small molecule discovery and design, researchers have developed a drought-protective 'drug' for crops, according to a new study. (2019-10-24)
Biologists build proteins that avoid crosstalk with existing molecules
An MIT study sheds light on how cells prevent crosstalk between signaling proteins, and also shows that there remains a huge number of possible protein interactions that cells have not used for signaling. (2019-10-23)
Listening in to how proteins talk and learning their language
A research team led by George Church, Ph.D. at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and Harvard Medical School (HMS) has created a third approach to engineering proteins that uses deep learning to distill the fundamental features of proteins directly from their amino acid sequence without the need for additional information. (2019-10-21)
Uncovering the principles behind RNA folding
Using high-throughput next-generation sequencing technology, Professor Julius Lucks found similarities in the folding tendencies among a family of RNA molecules called riboswitches, which play a pivotal role in gene expression. (2019-10-21)
Tennessee researchers join call for responsible development of synthetic biology
Engineering biology is transforming technology and science. Researchers in the international Genome Project-write, including two authors from the UTIA Center for Agricultural Synthetic Biology, outline the technological advances needed to secure a safe, responsible future in the Oct. (2019-10-17)
What gives a 3-meter-long Amazonian fish some of the toughest scales on Earth
Arapaima gigas is a big fish in a bigger river full of piranhas, but that doesn't mean it's an easy meal. (2019-10-16)
Synthetic cells make long-distance calls
Rice University synthetic biologists design transcriptional circuits that allow single-cell microbes to form networks that spur collective action, even in large communities. (2019-10-15)
A reliable clock for your microbiome
The microbiome is a treasure trove of information about human health and disease, but getting it to reveal its secrets is challenging. (2019-10-11)
Fentanyl's risk on the 'darknet'
US overdose deaths attributed to synthetic opioids, such as fentanyl, have increased from under 3,000 in 2013 to nearly 20,000 in 2016, making up half of all opioid-related overdose deaths. (2019-10-09)
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