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Current Synthetic Biology News and Events, Synthetic Biology News Articles.
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New compound allows bacterial communication to be controlled by light
Scientists from the University of Groningen have succeeded in incorporating a light-controlled switch into a molecule used by bacteria for quorum sensing -- a process by which bacteria communicate and subsequently control different cellular processes. (2019-04-15)
Synthetic peptide can inhibit toxicity, aggregation of protein in Alzheimer's disease
A team led by researchers at the University of Washington has developed synthetic peptides that target and inhibit the small, toxic protein aggregates that are thought to trigger Alzheimer's disease. (2019-04-15)
Tiny light-up barcodes identify molecules by their twinkling
An imaging technique developed at Duke University could make it possible to peer inside cells and watch dozens of different molecules at once -- by labeling them with short strands of light-up DNA that blink on and off with their own unique rhythm. (2019-04-12)
Single cell transcriptomics: A new sequencing approach
Researchers from University of Southern Denmark, Wellcome Sanger Institute and BGI, today published a study in the journal Genome Biology comparing the library preparation and sequencing platforms for single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq). (2019-04-09)
Marijuana for morning sickness? It's not great for baby's brain
With a growing number of states legalizing recreational or medical marijuana, more women are using the drug during pregnancy, in part due to its reported ability to relieve morning sickness. (2019-04-09)
Slug glue reveals clues for making better medical adhesives
The Dusky Arion slug produces a defensive glue that fouls the mouthparts of any would-be predator. (2019-04-08)
Blocking opioid receptors could reduce hormone-therapy-fueled increases in sugar intake
Estradiol is a commonly prescribed estrogen therapy. Previous research has found that rats treated with the hormone experience an increase in sugar consumption. (2019-04-07)
Synthetic antibody rapidly protects mice and monkeys from Zika
A DNA-encoded monoclonal antibody prevents Zika infection in mice and non-human primates, researchers report April 5 in the journal Molecular Therapy. (2019-04-05)
New guidelines push for better controlled experiments with synthetic nucleic acids
Researchers have proposed new guidelines to overcome current problems facing scientists developing synthetic nucleic acids -- such as antisense oligonucleotides and double-stranded RNAs -- as drugs and research tools. (2019-04-04)
Researchers create molecules with strong anti-Zika virus potential
Scientists have created a molecule with both strong anti-Zika properties and low toxicity to animal cells. (2019-04-04)
Bacterial factories could manufacture high-performance proteins for space missions
Nature has evolved protein-based substances with mechanical properties that rival even the best synthetic materials. (2019-04-02)
High throughput method to produce and screen engineered antimicrobial lanthipeptides
Nature has provided us with lots of antimicrobials. However, given the rapid increase of antimicrobial resistance, there is a need for the development of new-to-nature antibiotics. (2019-04-02)
Programmable 'Legos' of DNA and protein building blocks create novel 3D cages
The central goal of nanotechnology is the manipulation of materials on an atomic or molecular scale, especially to build microscopic devices or structures. (2019-04-02)
Toward novel computing and fraud detection technologies with on-demand polymers
Drawing inspiration from nature, researchers are making polymers with ever-more precise compositions on demand. (2019-04-01)
Next-generation single-dose antidotes for opioid overdoses
Fentanyl's powerful effects are long-lasting, and even tiny amounts of the drug can lead to an overdose. (2019-03-31)
Sea anemones are ingesting plastic microfibers
Tiny fragments of plastic in the ocean are consumed by sea anemones along with their food, and bleached anemones retain these microfibers longer than healthy ones, according to new research from Carnegie ecologists. (2019-03-28)
Designer organelles bring new functionalities into cells
For the first time, scientists have engineered the complex biological process of translation into a designer organelle in a living mammalian cell. (2019-03-28)
Engineering cellular function without living cells
EPFL scientists have come up with a systematic method for studying and even predicting gene expression - without using cells. (2019-03-25)
ELSI scientist constructs artificial photosynthetic cells
Scientists build artificial cells as models of primitive cells. Research team have constructed artificial cells using minimal components that are able to supply energy to drive gene expression inside a microcompartment, thus these artificial cells can produce energy that helps synthesize parts of the cells themselves. (2019-03-25)
Magnetic stir bars carry 'memory' from previous flasks and tubes
Magnetic stir bars are regarded as reusable consumables, and in many labs they last for months. (2019-03-20)
Even low doses of synthetic cannabinoids can impair cognitive performance
A new study shows that inhaled doses of as little as 2 mg of the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 can significantly impair critical thinking and memory, slow reaction times, and increase confusion and dissociation. (2019-03-19)
Stress hormones promote breast cancer metastasis
Scientists from the University of Basel and the University Hospital of Basel have deciphered the molecular mechanisms linking breast cancer metastasis with increased stress hormones. (2019-03-13)
Copying made easy
Whether revealing a perpetrator with DNA evidence, diagnosing a pathogen, classifying a paleontological discovery, or determining paternity, the duplication of nucleic acids (amplification) is indispensable. (2019-03-12)
The moiré patterns of three layers change the electronic properties of graphene
Combining an atomically thin graphene and a boron nitride layer at a slightly rotated angle changes their electrical properties. (2019-03-08)
Cells use sugars to communicate at the molecular level
Research from the University of Pennsylvania reveals how cells communicate at the molecular level. (2019-03-01)
Directed evolution builds nanoparticles
Directed evolution is a powerful technique for engineering proteins. EPFL scientists now show that it can also be used to engineer synthetic nanoparticles as optical biosensors, which are used widely in biology, drug development, and even medical diagnostics such as real-time monitoring of glucose. (2019-02-27)
Yeast produce low-cost, high-quality cannabinoids
UC Berkeley synthetic biologists have created an enzymatic network in yeast that turns sugar into cannabinoids, including tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, but also novel cannabinoids not found in the marijuana plant itself. (2019-02-27)
Geographic distribution of opioid-related deaths
Identifying changes in the geographic distribution of opioid-related deaths is important, and this study analyzed data for more than 351,000 US residents who died of opioid-related causes from 1999 to 2016. (2019-02-22)
Rules of inheritance rewritten in worms
Laboratory model breaks laws of heredity, opening up new research possibilities in genetics and synthetic biology. (2019-02-21)
Hachimoji -- Expanding the genetic alphabet from four to eight
A new form of synthetic DNA expands the information density of the genetic code, that likely preserves its capability for supporting life, according to a new study. (2019-02-21)
Light-based production of drug-discovery molecules
EPFL chemists have developed a light-based chemical method for cheap and simple production of chemical molecules used in drug discovery, such as muscle relaxants and antimicrobials. (2019-02-18)
Machine learning unlocks plants' secrets
Plants are master chemists, and Michigan State University researchers have unlocked their secret of producing specialized metabolites. (2019-02-18)
From sea to lab
With its vast numbers of different lifeforms, the sea is a largely unexplored source of natural products that could be starting points for new pharmaceuticals, such as the antitumor drugs trabectedin and lurbinectedin. (2019-02-18)
Tiny fibers create unseen plastic pollution
While the polyester leisure suit was a 1970s mistake, polyester and other synthetic fibers like nylon are still around and are a major contributor to the microplastics load in the environment, according to a Penn State materials scientist, who suggests switching to biosynthetic fibers to solve this problem. (2019-02-16)
Altered data sets can still provide statistical integrity and preserve privacy
Synthetic networks may increase the availability of some data while still protecting individual or institutional privacy, according to a Penn State statistician. (2019-02-16)
Making better embryos
One out of every six Canadian couples experiences infertility. Some resort to in vitro fertilization. (2019-02-14)
New painkiller lasts longer, is less addictive than morphine
As an alternative to morphine, researchers present a new nano-painkiller they've tested in rodents. (2019-02-13)
Moving artificial leaves out of the lab and into the air
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have proposed a design solution that could bring artificial leaves out of the lab and into the environment. (2019-02-12)
Microbial manufacturing
Led by Emily Balskus, Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, a team of researchers has untangled how bacteria found in soil are able to manufacture streptozotocin, showing for the first time that the compound is produced through an enzymatic pathway and revealing the novel chemistry that drives the process. (2019-02-06)
Cannabinoid compounds may inhibit growth of colon cancer cells
Medical marijuana has gained attention in recent years for its potential to relieve pain and short-term anxiety and depression. (2019-02-05)
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