Current Syphilis News and Events

Current Syphilis News and Events, Syphilis News Articles.
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Study suggests reporting of sexually transmitted infections may be impacted by COVID-19
With the health care community heavily focused on COVID-19 since the first quarter of 2020, there have been concerns that reporting of other diseases -- and the resulting data that enables them to be more effectively treated and controlled -- may have been impacted. For example, little is known about how the pandemic may have affected the reporting of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). (2020-12-15)

New research reveals risky sexual behavior and STIs are rising despite COVID-19 pandemic
New research launched at the 29th EADV Congress, EADV Virtual, has found that despite the COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) lockdown restrictions, diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including gonorrhoea, secondary syphilis and mycoplasma genitalium (MG), have increased. (2020-10-31)

Male circumcision campaigns in Africa to fight HIV are a form of cultural imperialism
World Health Organization-recommended campaigns to circumcise millions of African boys and men to reduce HIV transmission are based more on systemic racism and 'neocolonialism' than sound scientific research, according to a critical appraisal published in Developing World Bioethics. (2020-09-10)

Syphilis may have spread through Europe before Columbus
Columbus brought syphilis to Europe -- or did he? A recent study conducted at the University of Zurich now indicates that Europeans could already have been infected with this sexually transmitted disease before the 15th century. In addition, researchers have discovered a hitherto unknown pathogen causing a related disease. The predecessor of syphilis and its related diseases could be over 2,500 years old. (2020-08-13)

New chemical analyzes: What did Danes and Italians in the Middle Ages have in common?
Chemists have analyzed bones from a Danish and an Italian cemetery, casting light on the lives of nobles and common people in the north and the south of Europe. (2020-07-15)

One in five Georgian Londoners had syphilis by their mid-30s
250 years ago, over one-fifth of Londoners had contracted syphilis by their 35th birthday, historians have calculated. (2020-07-06)

Race, rurality play prominently in Georgia areas hardest hit by COVID-19
While counties in populous metropolitan Atlanta had the highest number of COVID-19 cases in the initial weeks following Georgia's first reported case, it was rural Southwest Georgia counties, with a higher number of black residents and lower number of ICU beds, experiencing the highest rates of infection and death per capita, investigators report. (2020-06-25)

Tropical disease in medieval Europe revises the history of a pathogen related to syphilis
Plague was commonplace in medieval times, so finding its victims in a 15th century Lithuanian graveyard was no surprise. However, discovering one woman with a second disease, yaws -- a close relative of modern syphilis found today only in tropical settings -- was something researchers did not expect. The current study's findings are changing perspectives on the evolutionary history of a disease family thought to be out of reach for the study of ancient DNA. (2020-06-11)

Syphilis eludes immune attack by altering a single gene
Shuffling of DNA in a single gene might be why the syphilis bacteria can evade the immune system. The change alters a protein on its cell surface to create a distraction. People can become re-infected several times with syphilis because they can't develop immunity, Untreated syphilis can hide in the body for decades. Genomic findings on these evasive strategies may point to designs for vaccines to outwit syphilis' defenses. (2020-04-24)

People fearful of taking part in vital clinical research
A review, led by researchers at the University of York and Hull York Medical School, has found that fear about testing new treatments and possible side effects was the most common reason given by patients for not wanting to participate. (2020-03-16)

Shale drilling activity linked to increased sexually transmitted infections in Texas, Yale study
Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have found that rates of two sexually transmitted infections (STIs), gonorrhea and chlamydia, are 15% and 10% higher, respectively, in Texas counties with high shale drilling activity (''fracking''), compared to counties without any fracking. (2020-02-13)

Health care in baboons
Sexually transmitted diseases reduce the willingness of female baboons to mate. (2019-12-04)

Syphilis infection rates in dialysis patients exceed general population
Syphilis rates, like other sexually transmitted disease rates in the United States, are soaring, and the first known study to examine syphilis rates in patients with kidney failure found an incidence greater than three times that of the general population. Neurosyphilis was the second most common syphilis type they found, investigators report in the Clinical Kidney Journal. (2019-10-16)

Discovered: Unknown yellow colors from antiquity
Antique artefacts have been studied by chemists, revealing a hitherto unknown use of yellow in Ancient Egypt. (2019-10-15)

NIAID officials call for innovative research on sexually transmitted infections
Sexually transmitted infections, or STIs, pose a significant public health challenge. Globally, more than one million new STI cases are diagnosed each day. In a new article in The Journal of Infectious Diseases, experts from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, suggest that the biomedical research community must refocus its commitment to STI research to surmount this growing global health crisis. (2019-09-09)

Europe: syphilis notifications up by 70% since 2010
The number of syphilis cases has been consistently going up across Europe since 2010, mostly affecting men who have sex with men living in urban areas. In 2017, notification rates reached an all-time high in the EU/EEA countries with more than 33 000 reported cases. An in-depth ECDC study describes the factors behind this increase and outlines the evidence-based options for public health control of syphilis, including case finding and management as well as educational activities. (2019-07-12)

Good medicine depends on diversity
Nearly 80 percent who have contributed DNA for research are of European ancestry. Columbia University Medical Center leads a National Human Genome Research Institute study designed to understand the barriers to minority participation and to support the creation of policies and approaches that will help build a diverse genetic database. The four-year study will analyze inclusion practices at academic medical centers based California, Alabama, Texas, Mississippi and in New York. (2019-07-01)

New in Ethics & Human Research, May-June 2019
Parent experiences when approached for research in a pediatric intensive care unit, the role of inclusion benefits in ethics committee assessment of research, and more in the current issue. (2019-05-23)

FIU scientists discover new arsenic-based broad-spectrum antibiotic
Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest public health threats of our time. There is a pressing need for new and novel antibiotics to combat the rise in antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Researchers from FIU's Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine are part of an international team that has discovered a new broad-spectrum antibiotic that contains arsenic. Arsinothricin is a natural product made by soil bacteria. The study is published in Nature's Communication Biology. (2019-04-16)

Case of tick-borne relapsing fever in Mexico
Tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) is a recurring fever caused by exposure to infected Borrelia bacteria. Several cases have been reported in Mexico, but the disease gets little attention. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases describe the details of an additional case of TBRF in Sonora, Mexico in 2012. (2019-04-11)

Study reports on bacterial STIs among men using PrEP
This study, which included nearly 3,000 mostly gay and bisexual men in Australia who received daily HIV preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), reports on the association of bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs) by describing diagnoses of chlamydia, gonorrhea or syphilis among the men and behavioral risk factors. (2019-04-09)

Problem drinking linked to HIV, other sexually transmitted infections in Ugandan youth, study finds
Youth living in the slums of Uganda who are infected with both HIV and sexually transmitted infections are more likely to engage in problem drinking, according to a study led by Georgia State University. (2019-03-12)

Gonorrhoea: Drug resistance compromises recommended treatment in Europe
Gonorrhoea is the second most commonly notified sexually transmitted infection across the EU/EEA countries with almost 500 000 reported cases between 2007 and 2016. The infection is treatable but Neisseria gonorrhoeae keep showing high levels of azithromycin resistance according to latest results of the European Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme. This antibiotic agent is part of the currently recommended therapy regimen for gonorrhoea and observed resistance patterns threaten its effectiveness. (2019-02-28)

Do we have an epidemic? Enhancing disease surveillance using a health information exchange
While disease surveillance has shifted toward greater use of electronically transmitted information to decrease the reporting burden on physicians, the challenge of getting the right information to public health officials at the right time has not been completely solved. At HIMSS19, Brian Dixon, Ph.D., of Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at IUPUI, outlines how using a health exchange network can facilitate electronic disease reporting. (2019-02-11)

Pay-it-forward model increases STD testing among gay men in China
Chinese gay men who were offered a free STD test and then asked to donate to the testing of another man were 48 percent more likely to get tested than men offered the standard of care, UNC researchers found. Learn how this approach could be applied for testing of other diseases. (2018-12-20)

USPSTF recommendation statement on screening for syphilis infection in pregnant women
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends early screening for syphilis infection in all pregnant women. (2018-09-04)

Drug-resistance of gonorrhoea in the EU: persistent but stable
Neisseria gonorrhoea continues to show high levels of resistance to azithromycin across the European Union and European Economic Area, according to the 2016 results of the European Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme (Euro-GASP). This threatens the effectiveness of the currently recommended dual therapy regimen for gonorrhoea. Overall, the rates of resistance to cefixime, ceftriaxone and azithromycin have remained stable when compared to recent years. (2018-08-30)

Few young women with PID screened for HIV or syphilis in emergency departments
Although women who have pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) are at heightened risk for also being infected with syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), few adolescent females diagnosed with PID in the nation's pediatric emergency departments undergo laboratory tests for HIV or syphilis, according to a retrospective cohort study published online July 24, 2018, in Pediatrics. (2018-07-24)

The Lancet: Response to HIV/AIDS epidemic at risk of 'dangerous complacency' as urgent change in approach is needed
HIV rates persist in high risk, marginalised populations and the Commission authors warn that a resurgence of the epidemic is likely as the largest generation of young people age into adolescence and adulthood. * Stalling of HIV funding in recent years endangers HIV control efforts. Historic 'exceptionalism' of HIV treatment and care may no longer be sustainable; services will likely need to be part of wider health care supporting related diseases and conditions. (2018-07-19)

Researchers report success culturing Treponema pallidum, which causes syphilis
The spiral-shaped bacterium that causes syphilis was so dependent on its human host that, until now and despite a century of work, it couldn't be cultured in a lab dish. That impasse may be resolved. (2018-06-26)

Ancient Treponema pallidum from human remains sheds light on its evolutionary history
The evolutionary history and origin of syphilis, and other treponemal diseases, is a hotly debated topic by scholars. Scholars who theorize syphilis originated in the 'New World' and preceded the 15th century have been in fierce debate with scholars who theorize a multiregional origin followed by the 15th century pandemic spread. Both sides are supported by organic evidence found in contemporary genetic and skeletal remains across the globe. (2018-06-21)

First ancient syphilis genomes decoded
An international research team has recovered the first historic genomes from the bacterium Treponema pallidum, which causes syphilis. It was previously not thought possible to recover DNA of this bacterium from ancient samples. In the study, published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, the researchers were able to distinguish genetically between the subspecies of the disease that cause syphilis and that cause yaws, which are not readily distinguishable in skeletal remains. (2018-06-21)

Finally, hope for a syphilis vaccine
Despite efforts to eradicate it, syphilis is on the rise. It is the second leading cause of stillbirth and miscarriage worldwide, and if left untreated it can cause strokes, dementia, and other neurological disease. Until now, most health agencies focused on treating infected people and their sex partners -- but new discoveries may make a vaccine possible, UConn Health researchers report in the June 12 issue of mBio. (2018-06-12)

A filthy first -- the 6 common types of disgust that protect us from disease revealed
Poor hygiene, animals or insects carrying disease and risky sexual behavior are among the distinct kinds of disgust that can help us to avoid disease and infection, according to new research published in a special issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. (2018-06-03)

UCLA researchers use search engines, social media to predict syphilis trends
UCLA-led research finds that internet search terms and tweets related to sexual risk behaviors can predict when and where syphilis trends will occur. (2018-04-16)

Study identifies how to improve WHO eradication strategy for skin disease
An international research collaboration published in The Lancet has found crucial evidence that could help to improve the current World Health Organization (WHO) strategy to eradicate yaws -- a chronic disfiguring and debilitating infectious disease affecting the skin, bones and joints. (2018-02-07)

Introducing internet-based testing for STIs doubles testing uptake in South London boroughs
Providing internet-based testing for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) could increase the number of people being tested for syphilis, HIV, chlamydia and gonorrhoea, including among high-risk groups, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine. (2017-12-27)

New study examines value of routine laboratory screenings for children entering foster care
Routine laboratory screening recommended for children entering foster care carries high costs and questionable medical benefits. (2017-11-15)

Model sheds new light on pathogen cooperation
New approaches are needed to control the spread of epidemic diseases, according to the developers of a new model of the way pathogens can 'cooperate'. Their study examined the ways two pathogens work together, finding that cooperativity between contagion processes is likely to make the spread of contagious infections more severe. (2017-11-15)

Low screening rates for adolescents diagnosed with PID in the nation's emergency departments
The nation's emergency departments had low rates of complying with recommended HIV and syphilis screening for at-risk adolescents, though larger hospitals were more likely to provide such evidence-based care. (2017-09-22)

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