Current Tai Chi News and Events

Current Tai Chi News and Events, Tai Chi News Articles.
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Robotic dogs & laughter therapy: combating loneliness & isolation while social distancing
Robotic dogs, laughter therapy and mindfulness are some of the ways that might help people - particularly the elderly - cope with loneliness and social isolation while social distancing, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2021-02-17)

Study of supergiant star Betelgeuse unveils the cause of its pulsations
Betelgeuse is normally one of the brightest, most recognizable stars of the winter sky, marking the left shoulder of the constellation Orion. But lately, it has been behaving strangely: an unprecedentedly large drop in its brightness has been observed in early 2020 (Figure 1), which has prompted speculation that Betelgeuse may be about to explode. (2021-02-08)

Snake micro scales reveal secrets of sidewinding and slithering
The mesmerizing flow of a sidewinder moving obliquely across desert sands has captivated biologists for centuries and has been variously studied over the years, but questions remained about how the snakes produce their unique motion. (2021-02-02)

Amazon spreads vaccine misinformation, iSchool researchers find
Amazon's search algorithm gives preferential treatment to books that promote false claims about vaccines, according to research by UW Information School Ph.D. student Prerna Juneja and Assistant Professor Tanu Mitra. (2021-02-02)

IU researchers discover how breast cancer cells hide from immune attack
Researchers at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified how breast cancer cells hide from immune cells to stay alive. The discovery could lead to better immunotherapy treatment for patients. (2021-01-27)

Chimpanzee friends fight together to battle rivals
Humans cooperate with each other in large groups to defend territories or wage war. But what underlies the evolution of this kind of cooperation? Researchers at the Max PIanck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and Harvard University show that there may be a link between social bonds and participation in large-scale cooperation: Chimpanzees join their close bond partners when fighting rivals. In humans, too, social bonds may have been essential to the evolution of cooperative abilities. (2021-01-22)

Strong M-M' Pauli repulsion leads to repulsive metallophilicity
A research team led by Professor Chi-Ming CHE and Dr Jun YANG, from the Research Division for Chemistry and Department of Chemistry at the Faculty of Science of the University of Hong Kong, has resolved a long-standing fundamental problem in the field of metal-metal closed-shell interaction. This work has been published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). (2021-01-18)

Breathing easier with a better tracheal stent
New research led by the University of Pittsburgh is poised to drastically improve the use of tracheal stents for children with airway obstruction. Researchers demonstrate for the first time the successful use of a completely biodegradable magnesium-alloy tracheal stent that safely degrades and does not require removal. (2021-01-15)

On the road to invisible solar panels: How tomorrow's windows will generate electricity
In a new study in Journal of Power Sources, an international team of researchers, led by Prof. Joondong Kim from Korea, demonstrate the first transparent solar cell. Their innovative technique rests on a specific part of the solar cell: the heterojunction, made up of thin films of materials responsible for absorbing light. By combining the unique properties of titanium dioxide and nickel oxide semiconductors, the researchers were able to generate an efficient, transparent solar cell. (2021-01-05)

Regulatory RNAs promote breast cancer metastasis
A gene-regulating snippet of RNA may contribute to the spread of many breast cancers. A molecule designed to destroy that RNA prevented metastases in animal models. The same strategy could be used to develop a new breast cancer drug. (2020-12-22)

Despite decrease in recent years, rate of sledding-related injuries still concerning
A new study conducted by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 220,488 patients were treated in U.S. emergency departments for injuries related to sledding from 2008 through 2017. Nearly 70% of these patients were children age 19 years and younger. (2020-12-16)

Reactive Video playback that you control with your body
An international team of researchers from Lancaster University, Stanford University and FXPAL, have created a system that dynamically adapts to mirror the position of the viewer's body and matches the speed of video playback to the viewer's movements. (2020-12-10)

Battling COVID-19 using UV light
Some University of New Mexico researchers have found a possible breakthrough in how to manage COVID-19, as well as future viruses. It involves using polymer and oligomer materials activated with UV light in order to kill microbes on surfaces. (2020-12-09)

Treating brain diseases now possible
POSTECH research team led by Professor Kyong-Tai Kim uncovers the mechanism that regulates local expression of key molecules in brain development and neurodegenerative diseases. (2020-12-01)

Researchers develop new biomaterial that helps bones heal faster
Scientists have developed a new biomaterial that helps bones heal faster by enhancing adults' stem cell regenerative ability. (2020-11-27)

The challenges of treating acute myocardial infarction due to variant angina
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1262, Wen-Yuan Ding, Jia-Min Li, Fei Zheng, Li-Li Wang, Xin-Yi Wei and Guo-Hua Li from Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Ji'nan, China, Affiliated Hospital of Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Ji'nan, China and Shandong First Medical University, Tai'an, China consider the challenges of treating acute myocardial infarction due to variant angina. (2020-11-19)

Study: exercise classes reduce loneliness, social isolation in seniors
Seniors who joined group exercise classes experienced decreased loneliness and social isolation, according to a new Cedars-Sinai study conducted before the COVID-19 pandemic. The classes have continued virtually since March, and early results suggest the online versions are also effective. (2020-11-12)

Social distancing is increasing loneliness in older adults
Social distancing introduced in response to COVID-19 is increasing feelings of loneliness in Scotland's older population and impacting their wellbeing, according to a new University of Stirling study. (2020-11-09)

Innovation spins spider web architecture into 3D imaging technology
Purdue University innovators are taking cues from nature to develop 3D photodetectors for biomedical imaging. The Purdue researchers used some architectural features from spider webs to develop the technology. (2020-10-21)

World's greatest mass extinction triggered switch to warm-bloodedness
Mammals and birds today are warm-blooded, and this is often taken as the reason for their great success. (2020-10-16)

COVID-19 shapes political approval ratings
During the early days of the pandemic, COVID-19 created a rally effect around political leaders, according to a large-scale study published Sept. 24, 2020. The rise of COVID-19 cases was associated with a 15- to 20-point boost in approval for United States governors and an average 14-point gain for world leaders. It's unclear how long the effect lasts, but the health crisis might be a catalyst to help incumbent governments win re-election. (2020-09-24)

Like humans, chimpanzees can suffer for life if orphaned before adulthood
A new study from the Tai Chimpanzee Project in Ivory Coast and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, shows that orphaned male chimpanzees are less competitive and have fewer offspring of their own than those who continue to live with their mothers. The remaining puzzle is, what is it that their mothers provide that keeps chimpanzees healthy and competitive? (2020-09-18)

A novel approach to childhood obesity prevention
A novel taxonomic approach to obesity prevention using existing U.S. obesity prevention (2020-09-16)

Yoga, Tai Chi, and meditation bring specific benefits for veterans
Three popular complementary and integrative health (CIH) therapies - yoga, tai chi, and meditation - lead to significant improvements in key outcomes perceived by Veterans receiving care in the Veterans Health Administration (VA) system, suggests a study in a special September supplement to Medical Care. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-08-24)

Breast cancer multidisciplinary management during COVID-19 pandemic
Breast Cancer Multidisciplinary Management during COVID-19 Pandemic: Experiences and Strategies Used by a Singapore Breast Surgical Unit https://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0012 Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this commentary article the authors Chi Wei Mok, Yert Li Melissa Seet and Su-Ming Tan from Changi General Hospital, Singapore and Singhealth Duke-NUS Breast Centre, Singapore consider experiences and strategies used by a Singapore breast surgical unit for multidisciplinary breast cancer management during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-08-18)

Biggest risk factors identified to try and prevent Alzheimer's disease
There are at least 10 risk factors that appear to have a significant impact on a person's likelihood of developing Alzheimer's disease that could be targeted with preventative steps, suggests research published in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. (2020-07-20)

Cancer cells in inhospitable brain fluids hijack iron to survive
In order to survive within the remote and harsh anatomical microenvironments of the central nervous system, the disseminated cancer cells that cause rare yet deadly leptomeningeal metastases (LM) hijack crucial iron micronutrients from native macrophages, researchers report. (2020-07-16)

Lung screening bus brings high-tech health care directly to patients
A mobile platform for lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (CT) can be developed with limited financial risk and take powerful screening tests directly to patients, including underserved rural areas where rates of new lung cancer cases tend to be higher. (2020-07-14)

Jellyfish contain no calories, so why do they still attract predators?
New study shows that jellyfish are an important food source for many animals. As jellyfish blooms become more frequent and more massive, this could affect marine ecosystems. (2020-06-24)

Bristol innovation challenges regular touchscreens with new spray-on technique
A team at Bristol has challenged the idea that touchscreens are limited to 2D and rectangular shapes by developing an interactive display that can be sprayed in any shape. Inspired by the way an artist creates graffiti on a wall and using a novel combination of sprayable electronics and 3D printing, the technique, called ProtoSpray, allows the creation of displays on surfaces that go beyond the usual rectangular and 2D shapes. (2020-06-24)

Getting real with immersive sword fights
Sword fights are often the weak link in virtual reality (VR) fighting games, with digital avatars engaging in battle using imprecise, pre-recorded movements that barely reflect the player's actions or intentions. Now a team at the University of Bath, in collaboration with the game development studio Ninja Theory, has found a solution to the challenges of creating realistic VR sword fights: Touche - a data-driven computer model based on machine learning. (2020-06-23)

Existing drugs may limit damage caused by HIV
Yale researchers have identified four drugs that may help minimize the long-term health effects of HIV infection, they report June 23 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2020-06-23)

Wearable patch may provide new treatment option for skin cancer
Purdue University innovators have created a novel wearable patch to provide an improved treatment experience for people with melanoma. The researchers developed a novel wearable patch with fully miniaturized needles, enabling unobtrusive drug delivery through the skin for the management of skin cancers. (2020-06-16)

Does estrogen influence alcohol use disorder?
A new study from researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago shows that high estrogen levels may make alcohol more rewarding to female mice. (2020-06-01)

Dairy consumption ineffective in preventing age-related bone loss or fractures
Dairy products provide more bone-beneficial nutrients than any other food group. Yet a new study based on data from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) shows that during the menopause transition, when bone loss is accelerated, they offer little benefit in preventing bone mineral density loss or fractures. Study results are published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2020-05-27)

High rate of blood clots in COVID-19
COVID-19 is associated with a high incidence of venous thromboembolism, blood clots in the venous circulation, according to a study conducted by researchers at Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS), UK. (2020-05-19)

Lighting up cells with genetically-encoded X-ray-sensitive probes
Synchrotron-based X-ray microscopy provides a unique approach for direct imaging a whole cell with its intrinsic nanoscale resolution. However, the lack of appropriate labels hampers its widespread use as compared to fluorescence super-resolution microscopy. A group of scientists in China repurposed peroxidases as genetically-encoded endogenous X-ray-sensitive tags, which allows nanoscale localization of protein-of-interest in mammalian cells. (2020-05-18)

Yale researchers discover how HIV hides from treatment
Even after successful antiretroviral therapy, HIV can hide dormant in a tiny number of immune system cells for decades and re-emerge to threaten the life of its host. Now Yale University researchers have discovered a molecular explanation for how the virus accomplishes this insidious trick, they report May 13 in the journal Science Translational Medicine. (2020-05-13)

Addressing the ethical considerations of SARS-CoV-2 human challenge trials
While an effective vaccine for the SARS-CoV-2 virus is likely many months away, development could be accelerated by conducting controlled human infection (CHI) studies -- which are increasingly being considered by the scientific community due to the urgent need. (2020-05-07)

New AI enables teachers to rapidly develop intelligent tutoring systems
Intelligent tutoring systems have been shown to be effective in helping to teach certain subjects, such as algebra or grammar, but creating these computerized systems is difficult and laborious. Now, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have shown they can rapidly build them by, in effect, teaching the computer to teach. (2020-04-30)

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