Current Talent News and Events

Current Talent News and Events, Talent News Articles.
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Research indicates gender disparity in academic achievement and leadership positions
New research on gender inequality indicates that fewer leadership prospects in the workplace apply even to women who show the most promise early on in their academic careers. (2021-02-03)

TALENT study supports NLCST and NELSON trial results
A study presented today by researchers with the Ministry of Health and Welfare in Taiwan confirmed the effectiveness of low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening in a pre-defined, never-smoker, high-risk population. The research was presented today at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer 2021 World Conference on Lung Cancer. (2021-01-30)

Boomerang performance is on par with internal employees who never left the firm, new paper finds
A new paper contrasts the outcomes for boomerang employees with those of internally promoted employees to help firms determine whether to invest in talent management strategies that include boomerang rehiring or to focus on internal strategies that develop current employees. (2021-01-12)

Why an early start is key to developing musical skill later in life
Is there, as some have suggested, a developmental period early in life when the brain is especially receptive to musical training? The answer, according to new research published in the journal Psychological Science, is probably not. (2020-12-22)

Powerhouse plants that bolster the food web
Researchers have identified the most critical plants needed to sustain food webs across the United States. Their study drills down to the top plants in each county and bioregion, illuminating a plan for how to restore ecosystems anywhere in the country. (2020-12-14)

A biased evaluation of employees' performance can be useful for employers
In assessing an employee's performance, employers often listen to his immediate supervisor or colleagues, and these opinions can be highly subjective. Sergey Stepanov, an economist from HSE University, has shown that biased evaluations can actually benefit employers. An article substantiating this finding was published in the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization. (2020-12-10)

35-second scan could pick the next sporting champion
How hard is it to pick the next Usain Bolt, Ian Thorpe or Anna Meares? Finding a world champion often falls to talent scouts and involves years of hard work, but could it be as simple as a 35-second body scan? (2020-08-03)

Sharing of tacit knowledge is most important aspect of mentorship, study finds
In one of the largest ever multidisciplinary investigations into mentorship and mentee performance, the Kellogg School of Management researchers found that the most impactful mentors are those who teach students to think independently and communicate their unique viewpoints effectively. And the most successful protégés are those who pursue their own unique research topics, rather than carrying on their mentors' work. (2020-06-08)

Sorry, Einstein: Hard workers may make better role models than geniuses
Role models are important for aspiring scientists, but new research suggests that scientists who are known for their hard work -- like Thomas Edison -- are more motivating than scientists who are viewed as naturally brilliant, like Albert Einstein. (2020-03-11)

Big ideas in performance management 2.0
Industrial-era performance management paradigms and practices are outdated and ineffective in the modern VUCA work environment. SIOP presents a video examining how to update performance management practices for success now and in the future of work. Presented by SIOP Fellow Alan Colquitt, PhD, the video 'webinar' provides actionable, evidence-based insights for I-O psychologists, business leaders, and HR practitioners seeking to create better outcomes for workers and organizations through practices fostering engagement and strong workplace performance. (2020-02-19)

Tech startups gravitate toward cities with strong social networks, study finds
The presence of technology startups can drive economic growth for their home cities. So how can cities better appeal to entrepreneurs? A new study from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin shows the connections they can offer matter more than big money. (2019-12-03)

Molière most likely did write his own plays
Two French researchers from the CNRS and Ecole nationale des chartes disprove the theory according to which Corneille was Molière's ghostwriter -- a popular and century-old theory, defended by some academics and writers. According to their forthcoming study in Science Advances, Molière would most likely be the only author of his numerous masterpieces. (2019-11-27)

Turning wood into pharmaceutical ingredients 
Production of hazardous waste during drug manufacturing is a serious concern for the pharmaceutical industry. Typically, large amounts of flammable solvents are used during these processes, which usually require several steps to make structurally complex drugs. Researchers now report in the journal ACS Central Science a method to produce pharmaceutically relevant compounds in just two or three steps, with water as the only waste product, using renewable woodchips as starting material. (2019-10-23)

Job sharing can boost number of women in senior higher education roles
Research from Lancaster University Management School, shows job sharing offers a route to increase the number of women in senior leadership roles in higher education. (2019-09-24)

Why should you care about AI used for hiring?
The Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology has published a new white paper that explores the hype and mystique surrounding artificial intelligence in hiring. This white paper provides an overview of artificial intelligence in the workplace, provides practical to-dos for organizations considering AI tools for their hiring process, and explains how I-O psychologists can help along the way. (2019-09-06)

Study finds that female leadership affects wage-gap and firm performance
A new paper in The Economic Journal, published by Oxford University Press, finds that female executives decrease the wage-gap for women at the top of a firm while widening it at the bottom. (2019-08-14)

Visa concerns deter foreign-born PhDs from working in startups
Foreign-born Ph.D. graduates with science and engineering degrees from American universities apply to and receive offers for technology startup jobs at the same rate as U.S. citizens, but are only half as likely to actually work at fledgling companies, a Cornell University study has found. (2019-08-05)

Win or lose: Rigged card game sheds light on inequality, fairness
Researchers at Cornell University are using a rigged card game to shed light on perceptions of inequality. (2019-07-17)

Performance improves when the enemy of an enemy is a friend
New research from Northwestern University finds that balanced professional networks are more important than individual talent when it comes to high-risk decision-making. (2019-06-17)

'Power shift' needed to improve gender balance in energy research, report says
Women still face significant barriers in forging successful and influential careers in UK energy research, a new high-level report has revealed. (2019-06-14)

Discovery may lead to natural ent-kaurane diterpenoid for NK-based tumor immunotherapy
Research groups led by Prof. LI Yan and Prof. Puno Pematenzin from the Kunming Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found that ent-kaurane diterpenoids, which show a wide range of bioactivity, especially antitumor activity, are good candidates as sensitizer agents for NK cells. (2019-05-30)

A light-activated remote control for cells
What if doctors had a remote control that they could use to steer a patient's own cells to a wound to speed up the healing process? Although such a device is still far from reality, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Nano Letters have taken an important first step: They used near-infrared light and an injected DNA nanodevice to guide stem cells to an injury, which helped muscle tissue regrow in mice. (2019-04-17)

Diversity efforts drive rise in female and minority medical school students
Medical schools in the United States are accepting more women and minority students a decade after diversity standards were introduced by a national accrediting body. According to Yale researchers, the standards are associated with an increase in both the number and proportion of applicants from underrepresented groups, suggesting that the pool of minority talent is sufficient to boost diversity. (2018-12-04)

Teen personality traits linked to risk of death from any cause 50 years later
Personality traits evident as early as the teenage years may be linked to a heightened or lessened risk of death around 50 years later, suggests observational research of 'baby boomers,' published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. (2018-11-20)

The secret to being more likeable on first dates and job interviews revealed
People who need to make a good impression on dates or in job interviews should concentrate on communicating the hard work and effort behind their success, rather than just emphasising their talent, new research from Cass Business School has found. (2018-10-22)

Shrimp talent quest finds a winner
Shrimp help keep fish clean -- and scientists have identified the 'cleaner shrimp' with the most talent for reducing parasites and chemical use in farmed fish. (2018-10-10)

Results from the ULTIMATE trial reported at TCT 2018 and published simultaneously in JACC
The first study designed to determine the benefits of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance over angiography guidance during drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation in all-comer patients found that IVUS improved clinical outcomes by lowering the rate of target vessel failure at one year. (2018-09-24)

The glass ceiling: Three reasons why it still exists and is hurting the economy
New research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business finds the glass ceiling -- that invisible barrier to advancement that women face at the top levels of the workplace -- remains as intractable as ever and is a drag on the economy. (2018-08-22)

Analysis chronicles changes in US investment in R&D
A new analysis examines how changes in innovation within firms and a shortage of human capital in the United States in the fields of software and IT have driven US multinational companies to establish and expand new innovation hubs abroad. (2018-08-03)

Chinese scientists achieve success in nitrogen metallization
A Chinese research team announced it has successfully metallized nitrogen at extreme conditions. The team, working at the Institute of Solid State Physics at the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (CASHIPS), developed its own pulsed-laser heating system and ultra-fast optical detection technology to conduct the experiment. (2018-07-06)

E- textiles control home appliances with the swipe of a finger (video)
Electronic textiles could allow a person to control household appliances or computers from a distance simply by touching a wristband or other item of clothing -- something that could be particularly helpful for those with limited mobility. Now researchers, reporting in ACS Nano, have developed a new type of e-textile that is self-powered, highly sensitive and washable. A video of an e-wristband in action is available. (2018-06-13)

Michael Jackson's antigravity tilt -- Talent, magic, or a bit of both?
Three neurosurgeons from the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research in Chandigarh, India, set out to examine Michael Jackson's antigravity tilt, introduced in the movie video 'Smooth Criminal,' from a neurosurgeon's point of view. (2018-05-22)

How our ancestors with autistic traits led a revolution in Ice Age art
Around 30,000 years ago realistic art suddenly flourished in Europe. Extremely accurate depictions of bears, bison, horses and lions decorate the walls of Ice Age archaeological sites such as Chauvet Cave in southern France. The authors of a new study argue that individuals with (2018-05-14)

High efficiency solar power conversion allowed by a novel composite material
A composite thin film made of two different inorganic oxide materials significantly improves the performance of solar cells. Researchers have developed this material which combines two crystal phases comprising the atomic elements bismuth, manganese, and oxygen. The combination of phases optimizes this material's ability to absorb solar radiation and transform it into electricity. The results are highly promising for the development of future solar technologies, and also potentially useful in other optoelectronic devices. (2018-04-09)

It's mostly luck, not pluck, that determines lifetime reproductive success
Can one seedling, or one female bird, be so superior to the rest that it will inevitably become the 'lucky' one to grow to the sky, or help perpetuate the species? The short answer: No. (2018-03-12)

PSU study: Pro-diversity policies make companies more innovative and profitable
PSU business school professor's research shows that companies that hire a more diverse set of employees are rewarded with a richer pipeline of innovative products and a stronger financial position. (2018-02-23)

Kids born later in the year can still excel in sport
A child's birth month shouldn't affect their long-term prospects in high-level sport and those who hold off on specialising until later years may be the most successful, according to new research from the University of Sydney. (2018-01-31)

Linking success in some fields to intellectual talent undermines women's interest in them
Due to the cultural stereotypes that portray 'brilliance' as a male trait, messages that tie success in a particular field, job opportunity, or college major to this trait undermine women's interest in it. (2018-01-09)

Brexit fallout: An uncertain future for academic scientists
On June 23, 2016, the UK voted to leave the European Union -- and science has not been immune to its effects. The referendum has led to uncertainties in future policies and funding that could hurt the research enterprise and science-related higher education in the UK, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (2017-11-01)

Call for arts to keep up with Asia
A James Cook University researcher says Australia lacks a proper strategy for developing the arts sector, as Asian nations pour money into developing their cultural power. (2017-09-03)

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