Current Taste News and Events

Current Taste News and Events, Taste News Articles.
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Food waste researcher: We must learn that brown fruit isn't bad fruit
We tend to avoid choosing apples with brown spots, assuming that they taste bad. But if we are to end food waste, we'll need to upend that assumption. UCPH researcher emphasizes that there's nothing wrong with oddly shaped or bruised apples. (2021-02-08)

Research highlights the need to incorporate nutritional counseling in cancer treatment
New research and analysis appearing in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, highlights the barriers cancer survivors face in maintaining a healthy diet, as well as the role nutrition may play in cancer risk and treatment. (2021-02-03)

New technology to detect bitter almonds in real time
Incorporating NIRS technology to almond analysis allows for quantifying amygdalin levels, the compound that causes the nut's bitter taste, on an industrial scale. (2021-01-29)

New study: Which beverages burst with umami potential?
In a new and first of its kind study, University of Copenhagen researchers study fermented beverages to find the one with the most umami flavour. Which one wins--champagne, beer, wine or sake? A UCPH researcher answers below. (2021-01-27)

Opertech Bio's pioneering approach to taste testing and measurement published in JPET
Opertech Bio, Inc., today announced the publication of a seminal research article describing the application of its pioneering TāStation® technology to the pharmacological characterization of human taste discrimination. The findings are published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, JPET. (2021-01-25)

Loss of smell is the best sign of COVID-19
Two international studies confirm that for the majority of patients with respiratory infections who lose the sense of smell, this is due to COVID-19. The disease also often results in both loss of taste and the other senses in the mouth. A researcher from Aarhus University has contributed to the new results. (2021-01-19)

Dairy product purchasing differs in households with and without children
American dairy consumers are often influenced by a variety of factors that can affect their buying habits. These factors include taste, preference, government information, cultural background, social media, and the news. In an article appearing in JDS Communications, researchers found that households that frequently bought food for children are interested in dairy as part of their diet and purchased larger quantities of fluid milk and more fluid milk with a higher fat content. (2021-01-15)

The regulatory network of sugar and organic acid in watermelon fruit is revealed
The innovation project watermelon and melon cultivation and physiology team of Zhengzhou Fruit Research Institute has made new progress in the metabolism regulation of sugar and organic acid in watermelon fruit. (2021-01-14)

High doses of saccharin don't lead to diabetes in healthy adults, study finds
For those trying to live a healthy lifestyle, the choice between sugar and artificial sweeteners such as saccharin can be confusing. A new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Medicine found the sugar substitute saccharin doesn't lead to the development of diabetes in healthy adults as previous studies have suggested. (2021-01-12)

NUS researchers concoct probiotic coffee and tea drinks
Good news for those who need a cuppa to start the day. Food scientists from the National University of Singapore have created new probiotic coffee and tea drinks that are packed with over 1 billion units of gut-friendly live probiotics. These non-dairy and plant-based beverages are can be stored chilled or at room temperature for more than 14 weeks. (2021-01-10)

Danish and Chinese tongues taste broccoli and chocolate differently
Two studies from the University of Copenhagen show that Danes aren't quite as good as Chinese at discerning bitter tastes. The research suggests that this is related to anatomical differences upon the tongues of Danish and Chinese people. (2021-01-05)

Drug discovery study identifies promising new compound to open constricted airways
In a preclinical study led by the University of South Florida, researchers identified and characterized 18 new compounds (agonists) that activate bitter taste receptor subtype TAS2R5 to promote relaxation of human airway smooth muscle cells. The cross-disciplinary team found 1,10 phenanthroline-5,6-dione (T5-8 for short) was 1,000 times more potent than some of the other bronchodilator agonists tested, and it demonstrated marked effectiveness in human airway smooth muscle cells grown in the laboratory. (2021-01-04)

Aroma diffuser and plastic bag offer inexpensive method to test fit of face masks at home
Researchers have developed a way to use a simple home aroma diffuser to test whether N95 and other types of sealing masks, such as KN95 and FFP2 masks, are properly fitted, a result which could be used to help protect healthcare workers and the public from contracting or transmitting COVID-19. (2020-12-16)

Augmented reality visor makes cake taste moister, more delicious
Researchers have developed an augmented reality (AR) visor system that enables them to manipulate the light coming off food in such a way as to 'trick' people consuming the food into experiencing it as more or less moist, watery, or even delicious. (2020-12-15)

Type of sugar used to sweeten sheep milk kefir may improve consumer acceptance
The study of human emotions can be used to gauge the sensory acceptance of dairy products. A possible route to increase worldwide consumption of sheep milk kefir may be to improve its sensory acceptance, which can be a determining factor for its inclusion in daily diets. In an article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists studied the effects of kefir sweetened with five different sugars on sensory acceptance and emotional profile in regular consumers of fermented dairy products. (2020-12-15)

COVID-19: persistent symptoms in one third of cases
A team of physicians and epidemiologists from the University of Geneva the University Hospitals of Geneva and the General Health Directorate of the State of Geneva followed nearly 700 people who tested positive for SARS-COV2 but did not require hospitalisation. Six weeks after diagnosis, 33% of them still reported suffering from fatigue, loss of smell or taste, shortness of breath or cough. These results call for better communication, reminding that SARS-CoV-2 infection is not trivial. (2020-12-08)

More than one-third of children with COVID-19 show no symptoms: study
More than one-third of kids who have COVID-19 aren't showing symptoms, according to a University of Alberta study that suggests youngsters diagnosed with the disease may represent just a fraction of those infected. (2020-11-30)

How 'smell training' could help overcome post-viral smell distortions
Smell loss is a prominent symptom of Covid-19 and the pandemic is leaving many people with long-term smell loss or smell distortions such as parosmia. Parosmia happens when people experience strange and often unpleasant smell distortions. Instead of smelling lemon you may smell petrol. New research shows that parosmia is associated with a recovery of smell performance among patients who undergo 'smell training' (sniffing at least four different odours twice a day every day for several months). (2020-11-30)

Children more willing to punish if the wrongdoer is 'taught a lesson'
Many children are willing to make personal sacrifices to punish wrongdoers -- and even more so if they believe punishment will teach the transgressor a lesson, a new Yale study published Nov. 23, 2020 in the journal Nature Human Behaviour shows. (2020-11-23)

The timeless, complimentary taste of oysters and champagne -- explained
Matching prices aren't the only reason oysters and champagne pair so well. According to a study published by the University of Copenhagen today, an uncanny umami synergy makes the combination of yeast-brewed bubbly and fresh molluscs a match made in heaven for some. Ironically, the new knowledge could help us consume more vegetables in the future. (2020-11-18)

People in developing countries eat less bushmeat as they migrate from rural to urban areas
New Princeton University research finds that when people in developing countries move from rural areas to cities, they consume less bushmeat over time, perhaps because other sources of animal protein are more readily available (2020-11-16)

Re-mapping taste in the brain
A new study from Stony Brook University found that the map of neural responses mediating taste perception does not involve, as previously believed, specialized groups of neurons in the brain, but rather overlapping and spatially distributed populations. (2020-11-12)

Silicone surface mimics topology, wettability of a real human tongue
The tongue helps people taste food, but structures on its surface also help them sense textures -- something that's also very important when savoring a meal. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have made a 3D silicone surface that, for the first time, closely mimics the surface features of the human tongue. The material could help food scientists study mechanical interactions of foods, liquids and medicines with the organ. (2020-11-11)

Sugar work: U-M study finds sugar remodels molecular memory in fruit flies
A high-sugar diet reprograms the taste cells in fruit flies, dulling their sensitivity to sugar and leaving a ''molecular memory'' on their tongues, according to a University of Michigan study. (2020-11-11)

In flies, consuming high-sugar diet reduces sensitivity to sweetness
In fruit flies fed a high-sugar diet for one week, a complex that regulates taste-related sensory neurons reprogrammed the neurons to make the flies less sensitive to sweet taste. Half of these changes were not reversed even after the flies returned to a control diet, the study shows, suggesting flies' perception of sweet taste was permanently altered. Anoumid Vaziri and (2020-11-11)

Smell and taste changes provide early indication of COVID-19 community spread
Self-reports of smell and taste changes provide earlier markers of the spread of infection of SARS-CoV-2 than current governmental indicators, according to an international team of researchers. The researchers also observed a decline in self-reports of smell and taste changes as early as five days after lockdown enforcement, with faster declines reported in countries that adopted the most stringent lockdown measures. (2020-11-11)

Sweet taste reduces appetite?
To date, very little is known about how sweetness perception contributes to satiety. This study, conducted by an Austrian-German team led by chemists Veronika Somoza and Barbara Lieder, provides new insights into the relationship between the sweet taste of sugar, energy intake and the regulatory process of hunger and satiety. The study was published in the journal 'Nutrients'. (2020-11-10)

Ants are skilled farmers: They have solved a problem that we humans have yet to
Ants have been farmers for tens of millions of years and successfully solved a riddle that we humans have yet to. A new study by researchers at the University of Copenhagen reports that ants are pros at cultivating climate-resilient crops. (2020-11-04)

Seven different 'disease forms' identified in mild COVID-19
In a study a team of MedUni Vienna scientists led by immunologist Winfried F. Pickl and allergologist Rudolf Valenta showed that there are seven ''forms of disease'' in COVID-19 with mild disease course and that the disease leaves behind significant changes in the immune system, even after 10 weeks. These findings could play a significant role in the treatment of patients and in the development of a potent vaccine. (2020-11-02)

How octopus suckers "taste by touch"
Imagine if you could taste something simply by touching it. Octopuses can do just that with their unique ''touch-taste'' sense, made possible by the suction-cup-like suckers along each of their eight arms. Now, researchers reporting October 29 in the journal Cell have new evidence as to how this sensory ability works. The findings help to explain how octopuses, and perhaps other marine organisms, explore the seafloor by tasting objects underwater with a simple touch. (2020-10-29)

Touch and taste? It's all in the tentacles
Scientists identified a novel family of sensors in the first layer of cells inside the suction cups that have adapted to react and detect molecules that don't dissolve well in water. The research suggests these sensors, called chemotactile receptors, use these molecules to help the animal figure out what it's touching and whether that object is prey. (2020-10-29)

Better measures reveal more COVID-19 smell loss
Smell loss is a prime symptom of COVID-19 but reports of prevalence vary from study to study, ranging from 5% to 98%. With this wide range of estimates, how do we prioritize its importance for testing and treatment? Monell researchers asked if the studies using direct measures versus self-report of could explain the range and found that with direct measures, 77% of COVID-19 patients had smell loss vs. 44% with self-report. (2020-10-15)

KIST addressing algal bloom in conventional water treatment facilities
An algal bloom refers to a phenomenon in which phytoplankton including blue-green algae rapidly proliferate in summer marked by high levels of solar irradiation and water temperature. It has lately been raising concerns due increased frequency of occurrence resulting from abnormally high temperatures and decreases in precipitation caused by climate change. Since there have toxic substances and these substances cannot be easily removed by a general water purification process, additional treatment using advanced water purification facilities and such is essential. (2020-10-12)

Mosquitoes' taste for blood traced to four types of neurons
The female mosquito has an amazing ability to detect blood using her syringe-like ''tongue.'' Now scientists have identified the neurons that give her blood-seeking powers. (2020-10-12)

Scientists discover mosquitoes' unique blood-taste detectors
Scientists aren't sure how mosquitoes sense taste of blood, or how they know that this, of all things, is something to gorge on. Nothing else, not even sweet nectar, makes them pump as ferociously as when they're draining our veins. New research identifies a unique group of neurons that don't care about simple tastes like sweet or salty. Rather, they activate only when sugar, salt, and other components of blood are all present at once. (2020-10-12)

Symptoms of COVID-19 are a poor marker of infection, new UK population study shows
86% of UK residents who tested positive for COVID-19 during lockdown did not have the specific virus symptoms (cough, and/or fever, and/or loss of taste/smell), finds a new study by UCL researchers. The authors say a more widespread testing programme is needed to catch 'silent' transmission and reduce future outbreaks. (2020-10-07)

Sprat, mollusks and algae: What a diet of the future might look like
Rethinking what we eat is essential if we hope to nourish ourselves sustainably and mind the climate. One option is to seek out alternative food sources from the sea. All the way at the bottom, where algae, cephalopods and tiny fish thrive, according to a new study from UCPH researchers. (2020-10-06)

Researchers call for loss of smell to be recognized globally as a symptom of COVID-19
Four out of five people experiencing the recent loss of smell and/or taste tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies--and of those who tested positive, 40 percent did not have cough or fever, reports a new study in PLOS Medicine by Prof. Rachel Batterham at University College London and colleagues. (2020-10-01)

Scientists identify new species of crystal-encrusted truffle, thanks to bonobos
Mushroom-munching bonobos in the Democratic Republic of the Congo have introduced scientists to a new species of truffle. (2020-09-22)

Fish oil without the fishy smell or taste
A new study, co-led by University of Cincinnati researchers, describes the development of a refining process that scientists deem a superior method to help produce better dietary omega-3 health and dietary supplements containing fish oil. (2020-09-15)

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