Current Tears News and Events

Current Tears News and Events, Tears News Articles.
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Wearable sensor monitors health, administers drugs using saliva and tears
A new kind of wearable health device would deliver real-time medical data to those with eye or mouth diseases, according to Huanyu 'Larry' Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Career Development Professor in the Penn State Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics (ESM). (2021-02-01)

Partners in crime: genetic collaborator may influence severity of the rare disease, NGLY1
In 2012, four-year-old Bertrand Might became the first-ever patient diagnosed with a rare genetic disorder called N-glycanase (NGLY1) deficiency. The discovery of this condition and Bertrand's diagnosis allowed doctors to look for other children with the same genetic defect. Since then, more than 60 additional patients have been found. Clement Chow, a University of Utah geneticist is determined to find what's going on. (2021-01-26)

Neither 'meniscal' nor 'mechanical' symptoms predict findings on knee arthroscopy
Orthopaedic surgeons have traditionally been taught that certain types of knee symptoms indicate damage to specialized structures called the menisci. But these ''meniscal'' and ''mechanical'' symptoms do not reflect what surgeons will find at knee arthroscopy, reports a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (2021-01-14)

Surrey unveils breakthrough manufacturing process of ultra-thin sensor for smart contact lenses
Smart contact lenses could soon become mainstream thanks to a new manufacturing process that has allowed the University of Surrey to develop a multifunctional ultra-thin sensor layer. (2021-01-06)

Contact lenses for diagnostic and therapeutic use
A collaborative team, which includes a group from the Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation, has developed a fabrication method to meet all the challenges in making a hydrogel contact lens for biomarker sensing. The specially engineered contact lenses use tears to monitor patient health. (2020-11-23)

Cornea appears to resist infection from novel coronavirus
Some doctors have worried that the novel coronavirus may be able to infect people by getting into their eyes. Viruses such as herpes simplex can infect the eye's cornea and Zika virus has been found in corneal tissue and tears, but new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests the cornea can resist infection from SARS-CoV-2. (2020-11-03)

Higher risk of future fecal incontinence after sphincter injuries
The risk of subsequent fecal incontinence and intestinal gas leakage is significantly higher among women who, during childbirth, have suffered a sphincter injury and consequent damage to the anal sphincter muscle, was shown in a new study from the University of Gothenburg. (2020-11-02)

Research could change how blood pressure is managed in spinal cord injury patients
New research from the International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD) challenges the current standard for managing blood pressure in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). (2020-10-15)

Hubble watches exploding star fade into oblivion
When a star unleashes as much energy in a matter of days as our Sun does in several billion years, you know it's not going to remain visible for long. Like intergalactic paparazzi, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured the quick, fading celebrity status of a supernova, the self-detonation of a star. (2020-10-01)

A cancer shredder
Researchers at the universities of Würzburg and Frankfurt (Germany) have developed a new compound for treating cancer. It destroys a protein that triggers its development. (2020-09-29)

Researchers uncover tools used by predatory bacteria to escape unharmed from prey cell
Predatory bacteria, capable of invading and consuming harmful bugs such as E .coli and Salmonella, use a unique tool to help them escape the cell they have invaded without harming themselves, according to a new study. (2020-09-23)

Seismic data explains continental collision beneath Tibet
New imagery reveals the causes of seismic activity deep beneath the Himalaya region, contributing to an ongoing debate over the continental collision process when two tectonic plates crash into each other. (2020-09-22)

NASA finds wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Josephine
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of Tropical Storm Josephine east of the Lesser Antilles island chain. Suomi NPP revealed that Josephine was being affected by wind shear. (2020-08-14)

NASA finds wind shear making Tropical Depression 10E struggle
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of a struggling Tropical Depression 10E in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Wind shear is preventing the storm from intensifying into a tropical storm. (2020-08-14)

Bird and reptile tears aren't so different from human tears
Vision is essential for the survival of most animal species and tears provide potentially life-saving protection for the eyes. A new first-of-its-kind study looks at the composition of bird and reptile tears and compares these findings to human tears. These results provide clues about tear evolution, as well as potential starting points for better eye treatments. (2020-08-13)

Big dogs face more joint problems if neutered early
Heavier mixed-breed dogs have higher health risks if neutered or spayed early, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis. (2020-08-13)

NASA finds wind shear and cooler waters winding down Tropical Depression 7E
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean and provided forecasters with a visible image of the waning Tropical Depression 7E. Wind shear and cooler waters were taking their toll on the storm. (2020-07-21)

Smart contact lenses that diagnose and treat diabetes
Professor Sei Kwang Hahn's team at POSTECH develops wireless smart contact lenses for diagnosis and treatment of diabetes (2020-04-27)

Lipid gradient that keeps your eyes wet
New understandings of how lipids function within tears could lead to better drugs for treating dry eye disease. (2020-04-07)

Suffering from skin damage from face masks?
DOCTORS and nurses on the COVID-19 frontline are spending many hours a day wearing face masks, and many members of the general public are doing the same. But although the devices offer invaluable protection, they can cause significant skin damage through sweating and the rubbing of the masks against the nose. Skincare experts at the University of Huddersfield are warning about the risks and suggesting remedies. (2020-04-03)

Low risk of coronavirus spreading through tears
Study published today in the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology found no virus in tears of COVID-19 infected patients. (2020-03-25)

Eye blinking on-a-chip
Researchers at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) have developed a device that moves fluids over corneal cells similarly to the movement of tears over a blinking eye. The scientists hope their findings, reported in the journal Lab on a Chip, will help improve ophthalmic drug development and testing, and advance understanding of how blinking affects the corneal surface. (2020-03-24)

APS tip sheet: Understanding the tears of wine
New research explores the fluid dynamics behind a phenomenon known as tears of wine (2020-03-10)

MRI findings predict shoulder stiffness for rotator cuff tears
Two MRI findings--joint capsule edema and thickness at the axillary recess, specifically--proved useful in predicting stiff shoulder in patients with small to large (< 5 cm) full-thickness rotator cuff tears, according to an ahead-of-print article in the May issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR). This study is important because it is the first to highlight joint capsule abnormality on MRI as a factor associated with stiff shoulder in patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears. (2020-02-19)

Smart contact lens sensor developed for point-of-care eye health monitoring
A research group led by Prof. DU Xuemin from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has developed a ''smart'' contact lens that can show real-time changes in moisture and pressure by altering colors. (2020-02-18)

No need to draw blood -- smart photonic contact lens for diabetic diagnosis and retinopathy treatment
Sei Kwang Hahn and his research team from POSTECH developed a smart LED contact lens. They are preparing for commercialization of wearable medical devices with PHI Biomed Company and Stanford University. (2020-01-10)

The claw disease tyloma is primarily genetic in cows
Scientists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and Georg August University Göttingen have succeeded in proving that a claw disease in cows is primarily genetic. Until now, the occurrence of interdigital hyperplasia has mostly been attributed to poor hygiene conditions in the barn. However, a team led by Professor Hermann Swalve discovered a farm in which the disease occurred frequently and was able to identify the gene responsible. As a result, the disease may now be contained through selective breeding. (2020-01-09)

Study: Water births are as safe as land births for mom, baby
A new study found that water births are no more risky than land births, and that women in the water group sustain fewer first and second-degree tears. (2019-12-10)

Imaging of conjunctival goblet cells helps diagnosis of dry eyes
Professor Ki Hean Kim and his research team developed the world's first biometric imaging of conjunctival goblet cells with high definition. (2019-12-05)

SUTD-led research sets the groundwork for patient-specific 3D printed meniscus
SUTD together with the University of Miyazaki developed a novel methodology to provide non-invasive analysis of meniscal implants. (2019-11-29)

Financial therapy can aid well-being, stability
Financial therapy could help couples navigate disagreements, money concerns and financial conflicts before these issues tear relationships apart. (2019-11-21)

Episiotomy may be beneficial in reducing severe perineal tears among forceps and vacuum deliveries
The use of episiotomy during childbirth has declined in Canada, although its benefit in births assisted by forceps or vacuum merits reconsideration of this practice, according to a large study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-10-21)

Vaginal tearing: Why are episiotomies down despite some benefits?
In Canada, the rate of episiotomy during childbirth has declined in recent years, but when it comes to births assisted by forceps or vacuum, this downward trend warrants a closer look, suggests new UBC research. (2019-10-21)

Protective mediators can help heal injured tendon cells by attacking inflammation
Tendon tears, both to the rotator cuff and Achilles heel, are common injuries, especially in aged individuals. Painful and disabling, they can adversely impact quality of life. New approaches are required to help patients suffering from chronic tendon injuries. A novel study in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier, identified mediators that promote resolution of inflammation as potential new therapeutics to push chronically injured tendons down an inflammation-resolving pathway. (2019-10-10)

How skin cells from foot soles could help relieve amputees of stump injury
Imperial scientists hope to re-engineer stump skin for more comfortable prosthetics -- using skin from the sole of the foot as a template. (2019-10-10)

Scientists 'must be allowed to cry' about destruction of nature
Scientists witnessing the destruction of the natural world must be supported and 'allowed to cry,' researchers say. (2019-10-10)

Stem cell treatments for shoulder and elbow injuries flourish, but so far there's little evidence they work
Two critical reviews in the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, published by Elsevier, examine the current status of biologic approaches for common shoulder and elbow problems. The authors discuss areas where the current evidence base is weak or controversial and recommend where further studies are required. (2019-10-01)

HSS researchers identify factor essential for tendon growth
Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) is essential for allowing tendons to adapt to physical activity and grow properly, according to basic science research by investigators at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). The findings provide a strong rationale for pursuing clinical trials to explore IGF1 as a new target for treating tendon injuries in humans. (2019-09-24)

For young athletes, sport specialization means increased risk of injury
Specialization in a chosen sport is associated with a higher volume of activity -- and it could increase young athletes' risk of sustaining both traumatic- and overuse-based injuries, new study says. (2019-09-23)

Engineering the meniscus
Damage to the meniscus is common, but there remains an unmet need for improved restorative therapies that can overcome poor healing in the avascular regions. (2019-09-23)

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