Current Tectonic Plates News and Events

Current Tectonic Plates News and Events, Tectonic Plates News Articles.
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Enormous ancient fish discovered by accident
Fossilised remains of a fish that grew as big as a great white shark and the largest of its type ever found have been discovered by accident. (2021-02-15)

A new strategy to destroy cancer cells using magnetic nanoparticles and fields
The scientists analyzed how magnetic nanoparticles can be manipulated in in vitro conditions to achieve a selective antitumor effect. The method is based on the combined action of nanoparticles and permanent magnetic fields on human tumor cells. (2021-02-11)

No new mountains formed during Earth's middle age, halting life's evolution for an eon
During the Proterozoic, Earth grew no taller - the tectonic processes that form mountains stalled, leaving continents devoid of high mountains for nearly 1 billion years, according to a new study. (2021-02-11)

A billion years in 40 seconds: video reveals our dynamic planet
New research has allowed geoscientists to show the uninterrupted movement of Earth's tectonic plates over the past billion years. (2021-02-08)

Spicy perfection isn't to prevent infection
Spicy food is considered an example of ''Darwinian gastronomy'': selection for antimicrobial ingredients to counter infection risk. By analysing over thirty thousand recipes, we show that average number of spices per recipe is more strongly associated with socioeconomic factors than infectious disease. (2021-02-04)

Thick lithosphere casts doubt on plate tectonics in Venus's geologically recent past
A study of a giant impact crater on Venus suggests that its lithosphere was too thick to have had Earth-like plate tectonics, at least for much of the past billion years. (2021-01-28)

Geological phenomenon widening the Atlantic Ocean
An upsurge of matter from deep beneath the Earth's crust could be pushing the continents of North and South America further apart from Europe and Africa, new research has found. (2021-01-27)

GEFS: Searching beyond seismology for earthquake precursors
In this special issue, EPJ Special Topics proposes the Global Earthquake Forecasting System (GEFS): the first collaborative initiative between multi-disciplinary researchers devoted to studying a diverse array of non-seismic earthquake precursors. (2021-01-25)

Canadian researchers create new form of cultivated meat
Researchers at Canada's McMaster University have developed a new form of cultivated meat using a method that promises more natural flavour and texture than other alternatives to traditional meat from animals. (2021-01-19)

Geologic history written in garnet sand
Syracuse University researchers probe deep secrets of trapped inclusions in garnet sand from Papua New Guinea (2021-01-14)

Microfabricated elastic diamonds improve material's electronic properties
Overcoming a key obstacle in achieving diamond-based electronic and optoelectronic devices, researchers have presented a new way to fabricate micrometer-sized diamonds that can elastically stretch. (2020-12-31)

Do toddlers learning to spoon-feed seek different information from caregivers' hands & faces?
When toddlers begin to use a spoon to eat by themselves, what kind of interactions facilitate this behavior? To find out, an international research collaboration led by Kobe University's Professor NONAKA Tetsushi and the University of Minnesota's Professor Thomas A. Stoffregen investigated the interactions between toddlers and their caregivers during mealtimes at a daycare center in Japan. (2020-12-27)

Deep, slow-slip action may direct largest earthquakes and their tsunamis
Megathrust earthquakes and subsequent tsunamis that originate in subduction zones like Cascadia -- Vancouver Island, Canada, to northern California -- are some of the most severe natural disasters in the world. Now a team of geoscientists thinks the key to understanding some of these destructive events may lie in the deep, gradual slow-slip behaviors beneath the subduction zones. This information might help in planning for future earthquakes in the area. (2020-12-21)

Secret of Australia's volcanoes revealed
New research from the University of Sydney proposes a theory that explains not only Australia's volcanic coast, but provides a framework for other incidences of intraplate volcanism in China, the US and the Caribbean. (2020-12-16)

How commercial vessels could become tsunami early-warning systems
If a tsunami formed along the Cascadia Subduction Zone off the coast of Oregon, residents might have just 20-30 minutes to get to safety. Scientists have proposed a new forecasting system that could provide seaside towns with critical early warnings. (2020-12-10)

New study helps pinpoint when earth's plate subduction began
According to findings published Dec. 9 in the journal Science Advances, plate subduction could have started 3.75 billion years ago, reshaping Earth's surface and setting the stage for a planet hospitable to life. (2020-12-09)

What will the climate be like when earth's next supercontinent forms?
The continents will reunite again in the deep future. And a new study, presented today during an online poster session at the meeting of the American Geophysical Union, suggests that the future arrangement of this supercontinent could dramatically impact the habitability and climate stability of Earth. The findings also have implications for searching for life on other planets. (2020-12-01)

Seismic activity of New Zealand's alpine fault more complex than suspected
New evidence of a 19th century earthquake on New Zealand's Alpine fault suggests that in at least one portion of the fault, smaller earthquakes may occur in between such large rupture events. (2020-12-01)

Researchers discovered solid phosphorus from a comet
An international study led from the University of Turku, Finland, discovered phosphorus and fluorine in solid dust particles collected from a comet. The finding indicates that all the most important elements necessary for life may have been delivered to the Earth by comets. (2020-11-26)

Piecing together the Alaska coastline's fractured volcanic activity
Among seismologists, the geology of Alaska's earthquake- and volcano-rich coast from the Aleutian Islands to the southeast is fascinating, but not well understood. Now, with more sophisticated tools than before, a University of Massachusetts Amherst team reports unexpected new details about the area's tectonic plates and their relationships to volcanoes. (2020-11-17)

Former piece of Pacific Ocean floor imaged deep beneath China
In a study that gives new meaning to the term ''rock bottom,'' seismic researchers have discovered the underside of a rocky slab of Earth's lithosphere that has been pulled more than 400 miles beneath northeastern China by the process of tectonic subduction. (2020-11-16)

East African Rift System is slowly breaking away, with Madagascar splitting into pieces
''The rate of present-day break-up is millimeters per year, so it will be millions of years before new oceans start to form,'' said Stamps, an assistant professor in the Virginia Tech College of Science.  (2020-11-13)

A new model found to predict earthquake propagation speed
In an article published on November 9th in Nature Geoscience, Jean-Paul Ampuero and Huihui Weng, two researchers from Université Côte d'Azur and the French National Research Institute for Sustainable Development (IRD-France) propose a new model to predict the propagation speed of earthquakes. (2020-11-09)

New fault zone measurements could help us to understand subduction earthquake
University of Tsukuba researchers have conducted detailed structural analyses of a fault zone in central Japan to identify the specific conditions that lead to devastating earthquake. The seismic slip processes that were inferred based on the measurements may be applicable to other subduction zones, such as those below the oceans. The gathered data could be applied in future attempts to describe or model the subduction earthquakes that lead to ground shaking and tsunami risk. (2020-10-30)

Deep magma facilitates the movement of tectonic plates
A small amount of molten rock located under tectonic plates encourages them to move. This is what scientists from the LGL-TPE (CNRS/ENS de Lyon/UCBL1) have recently discovered. Their new model takes into account not only the velocity of seismic waves but also the way in which they are attenuated by the medium they pass through. The velocity of tectonic plates near the surface is thus directly correlated with the quantity of magma present. (2020-10-21)

A new way of looking at the Earth's interior
Current understanding is that the chemical composition of the Earth's mantle is relatively homogeneous. But experiments conducted by ETH researchers now show that this view is too simplistic. Their results solve a key problem facing the geosciences - and raise some new questions. (2020-10-21)

Turbulent era sparked leap in human behavior, adaptability 320,000 years ago
The first analysis of a sedimentary drill core representing 1 million years of environmental history in the East African Rift Valley shows that at the same time early humans were abandoning old tools in favor of more sophisticated technology and broadening their trade, their landscape was experiencing frequent fluctuations in vegetation and water supply that made resources less reliably available. The findings suggest that instability in their landscape was a key driver of human adaptability. (2020-10-21)

Lost and found: UH geologists 'resurrect' missing tectonic plate
A team of geologists at the University of Houston College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics believes they have found the lost plate known as Resurrection in northern Canada by using existing mantle tomography images. (2020-10-20)

Glimpse deep into Earth's crust finds heat source that may stabilize continents
Rocks from the Rio Grande continental rift have provided a rare snapshot of active geology deep inside Earth's crust, revealing new evidence for how continents remain stable over billions of years, according to a team of scientists. (2020-10-19)

How rain can move mountains
Scientists have long thought that rainfall has a dramatic effect on the evolution of mountainous landscapes, but the reasons for how and why have been elusive. This seemingly logical concept has never been quantitatively demonstrated until now, thanks to a new technique that captures precisely how even the mightiest of mountain ranges -- the Himalaya -- bends to the will of raindrops. (2020-10-19)

Ground-breaking discovery finally proves rain really can move mountains
A pioneering technique which captures precisely how mountains bend to the will of raindrops has helped solve a long-standing scientific enigma. (2020-10-16)

EPFL scientist gains fresh insight into the origins of earthquakes
The speed and intensity with which seismic waves propagate after an earthquake depend mainly on forces occurring deep inside the rocks along a fault line, according to a study by EPFL scientist François Passelègue. His sophisticated models are giving us fresh insight into the factors that can trigger an earthquake. (2020-10-12)

Making bones is less difficult than was previously thought
The way in which bone formation occurs needs to be redefined. This was revealed by Radboud university medical center researchers and their colleagues in a publication in Nature Communications. It turns out that bone formation does not require complex biomolecules in collagen at all. This means that the production of bone substitutes and biomaterials is less complicated than was previously thought. (2020-10-08)

Research may curb economic losses to power plants after earthquakes
Sitting atop power transformers are bushing systems that play a critical role in supplying communities with electricity. However, these objects are also susceptible to breaking during earthquakes. Once damaged, bushings can cause widespread outages and burden a state with expensive repairs. (2020-10-01)

Lessons from a cooling climate
Usually, talk of carbon sequestration focuses on plants: forests storing carbon in the trunks of massive trees, algae blooming and sinking to the seabed, or perhaps peatlands locking carbon away for tens of thousands of years. (2020-09-29)

Halt post-disturbance logging in forests
Please do not disturb: After forest fires, bark beetle infestations and other damage, the affected forests should not be cleared. (2020-09-23)

Seismic data explains continental collision beneath Tibet
New imagery reveals the causes of seismic activity deep beneath the Himalaya region, contributing to an ongoing debate over the continental collision process when two tectonic plates crash into each other. (2020-09-22)

Detaching and uplifting, not bulldozing
ETH researchers have used a computer model to test a new hypothesis about the formation of the Alps while simulating seismic activity in Switzerland. This will help improve current earthquake risk models. (2020-09-17)

Venus' ancient layered, folded rocks point to volcanic origin
An international team of researchers has found that some of the oldest terrain on Venus, known as tesserae, have layering that seems consistent with volcanic activity. The finding could provide insights into the enigmatic planet's geological history. (2020-09-17)

Magnetic field with the edge!
This study overturns a dominant six-decade old notion that the giant magnetic field in a high intensity laser produced plasma evolves from the nanometre scale. Instead the field actually originates at macroscopic scales defined by the boundaries of the electron beam that is propagating in the plasma. This could alter our understanding of magnetic fields in astrophysics and laser fusion and may help in designing next generation high energy particle sources for imaging and therapies. (2020-09-14)

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