Current Terrorism News and Events

Current Terrorism News and Events, Terrorism News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 14 | 526 Results
New tool to combat terrorism
Forensic science experts at Flinders University are refining an innovative counter-terrorism technique that checks for environmental DNA in the dust on clothing, baggage, shoes or even a passport. ''This microscopic environmental trace evidence, based on soil geochemical, bacterial and fungal analysis would complement and enhance current forensic intelligence tools,'' lead researcher Dr Jennifer Young says in new research in Forensic Science International: Genetics. (2020-11-19)

COVID-19 a "golden opportunity" for terror organisations to intensify their propaganda
The uncertainty and confusion caused by the COVID-19 pandemic is being ''widely exploited by terror groups for spinning a plethora of sinister schemes'', which could lead to a new tide of violence against people and governments. (2020-10-30)

Recovery from grief is a slow, difficult process for families of terrorism victims
People who lose loved ones to terrorism are at a particularly high risk of developing Prolonged Grief Disorder, a condition characterized by severe and persistent longing for the deceased and reduced functioning in daily life. Researchers assessed grief in parents and siblings of those killed in the 2011 terrorist attacks in Norway, and found that nearly 80% of study participants experienced a high level of grief and either no sign or a slow recovery. (2020-10-14)

Economists: Lack of COVID-19 preparedness in line with previous findings
The threat of a catastrophic pandemic in 2014 -- the West African Ebola outbreak -- did little to change the perception of US citizens regarding the importance of preparing for future outbreaks, (2020-05-14)

COVID-19 and terrorism: Assessing the short and long-term impacts of terrorism
A new report authored by Pool Re and Cranfield University's Andrew Silke, Professor of Terrorism, Risk and Resilience, reveals how the COVID-19 pandemic is already having a significant impact on terrorism around the world. (2020-05-14)

Rapid DNA test quickly identifies victims of mass casualty event
To quickly identify victims of the 2018 Camp Fire, the deadliest wildfire in California's history, researchers used a technique called Rapid DNA Identification that can provide results within hours, compared with months to years required of conventional DNA analysis. The findings are published in the Journal of Forensic Sciences. (2020-03-04)

Hate speech dominates social media platform when users want answers on terrorism
People often resort to using hate speech when searching about terrorism on a community social media platform, a study has found. (2020-02-20)

Strategies to lower risk for violent crime and gun violence
Researchers at the annual meeting of The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) present a series of studies during its Study of Violent Crime and Gun Violence symposium which contributes several new frameworks that can be used toward improving laws, civilian strategies, legislation and police response, as well as the overall study of risk in society. The Symposium will occur on Monday, Dec. 9 at 10:30 at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Va. (2019-12-09)

Study finds US policies could have negative implications for Africa
A new study finds that while the current United States administration's policies in Africa may appear undeveloped, there are distinct trends and tendencies that have the potential to negatively impact Africa's economic growth. (2019-11-19)

Failure prognosis: Data science predicts which failures will ultimately succeed
Data science finds there is a critical threshold of lessons from failure that must be applied in order to achieve eventual success. (2019-10-30)

Predicting terror activity before it happens
Data scientist have developed a model that utilizes publicly available data to accurately predict how lethal a terror organization will become in the future based on only its first 10 attacks. (2019-10-07)

Forget 'Obamageddon', 'prepping' is now part of mainstream US politics and culture
Criminologist Dr. Michael Mills challenges the traditional view that US 'preppers' are motivated by extreme right-wing or apocalyptic views. (2019-08-08)

Populist Eurosceptics don't gain from terrorist attacks
Populist Eurosceptics don't gain from terrorist attacks Research led by the University of Kent has found that terrorist attacks in Europe don't increase support for populist parties. In fact, people in Germany became more positive towards the EU after the 2016 Berlin Christmas market attack in that country, the researchers found. (2019-06-05)

Lack of evaluation in countering violent extremism may boost terror threat
A lack of evaluation of the impact of countering violent extremism (CVE) and counter-terrorism (CT) efforts may actually be increasing the threat and risk of terrorism, a new study points out. (2019-05-22)

UTSA political scientist analyzes the UN's Twitter feed to improve diplomatic relations
Through research by a political scientist at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), there is potential to see diplomacy between nations improve through the use of Twitter. UTSA researcher, Matthias Hofferberth, is exploring how the United Nations (UN), uses Twitter as a diplomacy tool, an approach that has been discussed as Twiplomacy. (2019-05-21)

Developed countries benefit economically from counterterrorism efforts
A new study in Oxford Economic Papers suggests that developed counties may see significant economic gains from their efforts to combat terrorist threats. Developing counties, in contrast, appear to suffer economically from counterterrorism threats. (2019-05-07)

Study highlights how little we know about women terrorists
The first large-scale research project evaluating the characteristics of women involved in jihadism-inspired terrorism finds significant differences between men and women in both their backgrounds and their roles within terrorist groups. The study highlights potential flaws in existing models of radicalization, threat assessment tools and counter-terrorism strategies - all of which rely primarily on data regarding male terrorists. (2019-04-29)

Study shows alarming increases of firearm deaths in US school-age children
From 1999 to 2017, 38,942 US children ages 5 to 18 years old were killed by firearms, averaging more than 2,000 deaths a year. In 2017 alone, 2,462 school-age children were killed by firearms compared to 144 police officers and 1,000 active military worldwide who died in the line of duty. The study finds significant increases that began with an epidemic in 2009, followed by another one in 2014. Each of these epidemics has continued through 2017. (2019-03-21)

Extremist sympathies more likely in white British and UK-born people
White British people are almost twice as likely to hold extremist views as people of Pakistani heritage in England, according to a study by Queen Mary University of London. (2019-03-14)

How news coverage of terrorism may shape support for anti-Muslim policies
Terrorist attacks committed by the so-called Islamic State are rising in Western countries. A new Political Psychology study indicates that how the news media portray these attacks may influence emotional responses and support for anti-Muslim policies such as immigration bans. (2019-02-21)

UA researcher: Great disparities exist in how news media cover terror attacks
This is the first study to specifically look at how perpetrator religion impacts coverage across such a wide scope of terrorism cases. Researchers say ''members of the public tend to fear the 'Muslim terrorist' while ignoring other threats,'' due to an imbalance in how news media cover terror attacks. (2019-02-19)

Terror attacks by Muslims get 357 percent more media coverage than other terror attacks, study shows
Terror attacks carried out by Muslims receive on average 357 percent more media coverage than those committed by other groups, according to research conducted at Georgia State University. (2019-02-19)

Does PTSD affect heart disease and cancer risk?
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was associated with cardiovascular disease and cancer, as well as the metabolic syndrome, in a new study. In the Journal of Neuroscience Research study of 84 individuals diagnosed with PTSD (39 victims of terrorist attacks and 45 victims of other traumatic events), males were more likely to have circulatory and metabolic complications, whereas females had a higher prevalence of benign and malignant cancers. (2019-01-09)

An understudied form of child abuse and intimate terrorism: Parental Alienation
According to Colorado State University social psychologist Jennifer Harman, about 22 million American parents have been the victims of behaviors that lead to something called parental alienation. Having researched the phenomenon for several years, Harman is urging psychological, legal and child custodial disciplines to recognize parental alienation as a form of both child abuse and intimate partner violence. Harman has authored a review article in Psychological Bulletin defining the behaviors associated with parental alienation and advocating for more research into its prevalence and outcomes. (2018-11-27)

Using social media to weaken the wrath of terror attacks
Governments and police forces around the world need to beware of the harm caused by mass and social media following terror events. In a new report, leading counter-terrorism experts from around the world offer guidance to authorities to better manage the impacts of terror attacks by harnessing media communication. (2018-11-14)

Autonomous vehicles could shape the future of urban tourism
In the first study of its kind, published in the Annals of Tourism Research, academics from the University of Surrey and the University of Oxford have examined how Autonomous Vehicles (AVs) may have a substantial impact on the future of urban tourism. (2018-11-07)

'Terrorism does not terrorize' claims new study
The impact of terrorist events on mental wellbeing may be less significant than we are led to believe, argue the authors of a significant new study published today in The Lancet Psychiatry. (2018-10-16)

UT Dallas study provides fuller picture of the human cost from terrorist attacks
New research from The University of Texas at Dallas provides a more complete picture of the suffering caused by terrorist attacks. The study, published in the journal Public Choice, estimates the number of years of healthy life -- years free of the injuries or disabilities caused by terrorist attacks -- that victims lost due to injuries. (2018-10-12)

Can we trust digital forensic evidence?
Research carried out at the University of York has suggested that more work is needed to show that digital forensic methods are robust enough to stand-up to interrogation in a court of law. (2018-10-02)

Six countries in the Americas account for half of all firearm deaths
A new study reveals more than a quarter-million people died from firearm-related injuries in 2016, with half of those deaths occurring in only six countries in the Americas: Brazil, the United States, Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela, and Guatemala. (2018-08-28)

Military spending did not 'crowd out' welfare in Middle East prior to Arab Spring
Findings dispute 'guns versus butter' narrative as a major factor behind the Arab Spring. Researchers caution against uncritically applying lessons from Western nations to interpret public policy decisions in the Middle East. (2018-07-24)

Perceived race of victims, location determine concern in terrorist attack
In response to an international terrorist attack, the public's level of concern has to do with the locations of the attacks and the perceived identities of the victims, according to a new study by two University of Kansas researchers. (2018-06-28)

Philosopher warns against 'drifting into state terrorism'
Philosopher Michael Quante calls for social debate on ethically justifiable warfare - (2018-06-11)

Bad news becomes hysteria in crowds, new research shows
News stories about terrorism, disease outbreaks, natural disasters, and other potential threats become increasingly negative, inaccurate and hysterical when passed from person to person, according to new research by the University of Warwick. (2018-06-07)

Internet search data shows link between anti-Muslim and pro-ISIS searches in the US
In ethnically alike communities where poverty levels run high, anti-Muslim internet searches are strongly associated with pro-ISIS searches, according to a new analysis. This pattern, say the authors, suggests that counterterrorism policies targeting Muslims may do the opposite of what they intend, making these communities even more vulnerable to radicalization. (2018-06-06)

American 'prepping' culture influenced by media and government fears
The act of 'prepping' is not driven by delusional fears of society's imminent collapse, but more a response to fears raised by the media and government over short-term, but possible, shocks to society. (2018-05-23)

ISIL activity is not funded by oil, study suggests
Oil was never as important to ISIL terrorists as many thought, despite media reports of an oil-related income of as much as US $28 million a week, according to a new study in Energy Research & Social Science. This knowledge supports efforts to weaken terrorist organizations like ISIL, by first understanding how they are funded and how financially stable they are. (2018-04-30)

Missile strikes against Syria 'as serious as triggering events,' expert says
The University of Notre Dame's Mary Ellen O'Connell says reprisal attacks are a serious breach of the United Nations charter. (2018-04-12)

False news spreads widely and easily
Three MIT researchers, Soroush Vosoughi and Deb Roy of the Media Lab and Sinan Aral of the Sloan School of Management, investigated all the true and false news stories verified by six independent fact checking organizations that were distributed on Twitter from 2006 to 2017. The researchers found that false news travels farther, faster, deeper and more broadly than the truth online in all categories. (2018-03-08)

Dying for the group: What motivates the ultimate sacrifice?
Whether idolized as heroes or demonized and labelled terrorists, throughout history people have been willing to die for their groups and the causes they believe in. But why? New Oxford University research, suggests that there is a unique psychological process that may play a crucial role in motivating the ultimate sacrifice: identity fusion. (2018-03-05)

Page 1 of 14 | 526 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.