Current Terrorist Attacks News and Events

Current Terrorist Attacks News and Events, Terrorist Attacks News Articles.
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Long-term stress linked to increased risk of heart attack
Can long-term stress lead to heart attacks? Most people would probably answer in the affirmative, but the scientific evidence of this is scarce. A new study by researchers from Linköping University in Sweden reveals that the levels of the stress hormone cortisol were increased in the months preceding a heart attack. The results, published in Scientific Reports, suggest that long-term stress is a risk factor for heart attacks. (2021-02-10)

Deepfake detectors can be defeated, computer scientists show for the first time
Systems designed to detect deepfakes --videos that manipulate real-life footage via artificial intelligence--can be deceived, computer scientists showed for the first time at the WACV 2021 conference which took place online Jan. 5 to 9, 2021. Researchers showed detectors can be defeated by inserting inputs called adversarial examples into every video frame. The adversarial examples are slightly manipulated inputs which cause artificial intelligence systems such as machine learning models to make a mistake. (2021-02-08)

Lockdown linked to drop in asthma attacks, GP data suggests
Asthma attack rates seen at GP surgeries in England fell significantly during the first Covid-19 pandemic lockdown of 2020, a study suggests. (2021-02-08)

Experimental vaccine blunts the deadliest of synthetic opioids
As the opioid epidemic raged on with an even greater force during COVID-19, the Scripps Research laboratory of chemist Kim Janda, PhD, has been working on new therapeutic interventions that may be able to prevent the bulk of deaths from opioid overdose. Janda and his team have developed experimental vaccines that have shown in rodents to blunt the deadly effects of fentanyl as well as its even more fatal cousin, carfentanil. (2021-02-04)

Unlocking PTSD: New study reveals why trauma-focused psychotherapy treatment works
MEDIA: Trauma-focused psychotherapy is the best-known treatment for PTSD. But how does it work? Dell Med researcher Greg Fonzo says he may have found the answer by exploring how different parts of the brain talk to one another. (2021-01-27)

IU researchers discover how breast cancer cells hide from immune attack
Researchers at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified how breast cancer cells hide from immune cells to stay alive. The discovery could lead to better immunotherapy treatment for patients. (2021-01-27)

Three mental health conditions contribute to violent offenses, WCU study finds
Western Carolina University researchers find a disproportionate number of inmates with violent offenses suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, panic disorder and alcohol use disorder, and published their findings in the Journal of Criminal Psychology. (2021-01-27)

Counting patients social determinants of health may help doctors avert fatal heart attacks
Doctors may be able to predict their patients' risks of fatal coronary heart disease more accurately by taking into account the number of adverse social factors affecting them, according to a new study led by researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian. (2021-01-21)

Mayo Clinic study indicates age influences sex-related outcomes after heart attack
Approximately 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes occur every year in men and women in the US Sex and age play a large part in who experiences a heart attack, the methods used to treat these heart attacks, and the eventual post hospital outcomes of the people who experience heart attacks. Mayo Clinic researchers discuss these sex and age differences in study findings published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2021-01-20)

Drinking during COVID-19 up among people with anxiety and depression
People with anxiety and depression are more likely to report an increase in drinking during the COVID-19 pandemic than those without mental health issues, according to a new study by researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health. (2021-01-19)

One in four doctors attacked, harassed on social media
The first known study to describe physician experiences with online harassment found one in four physicians report being personally attacked on social media, including being barraged by negative reviews, receiving coordinated harassment and threats at work, and having their personal information shared publicly. Some attacks were particularly disturbing, such as threats of rape and death. Although the data were collected before the COVID-19 outbreak, the findings highlight the intensity of online harassment before the pandemic, which has only intensified since the spring. (2021-01-04)

Ignoring CDC guidelines leads to fear, anger among employees
Companies not following the recommended safety protocols set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during the COVID-19 pandemic could have a significant impact on employee trust, loyalty and overall commitment, according to a new study. (2020-12-16)

A better kind of cybersecurity strategy
The multilateral nature of cybersecurity today makes it markedly different than conventional security, according to a study co-authored by Alexander Wolitzky of MIT. The researchers' new model shows why countries that retaliate too much against online attacks can make things worse for themselves. (2020-12-09)

Rutgers reports first instance of COVID-19 triggering recurrent Guillain-Barré Syndrome
Researchers at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School have reported the first instance of COVID-19 triggering a recurrence of Guillain-Barré Syndrome - a rare disorder where the body's immune system attacks nerves and can lead to respiratory failure and death. (2020-12-08)

The role of drones in 5G network security
A study by Giovanni Geraci, a researcher at the Department of Information and Communication Technologies, and researchers at Mississippi State University (USA), which aims to improve the security of advanced wireless networks against a series of eavesdropping, interference and identity theft. (2020-11-18)

Excessive alcohol consumption during the COVID-19 pandemic
The full impact of COVID-19 on alcohol use is not yet known, but rates have been rising during the first few months of the pandemic. There's an urgent need for public health and medical responses to address harmful alcohol use. (2020-11-02)

COVID-19 a "golden opportunity" for terror organisations to intensify their propaganda
The uncertainty and confusion caused by the COVID-19 pandemic is being ''widely exploited by terror groups for spinning a plethora of sinister schemes'', which could lead to a new tide of violence against people and governments. (2020-10-30)

Weight-reduction surgery for severely obese adults may prevent second heart attack, death
Adults with severe obesity (BMI >35) and a prior heart attack who undergo weight-reduction surgery may lower their risk of a second heart attack, major cardiovascular event, heart failure and death. The effect weight-reduction surgery had on the patients' weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and A1C (a Type 2 diabetes marker) seems to play a role in decreasing the risk of heart attack and death. (2020-10-26)

New control architecture defends complex interconnected systems against cyberattacks
Distributed systems are becoming more and more essential in everyday life. From power plants to autonomous vehicles, modular, interconnected systems, colloquially referred to as Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS), provide crucial services and capabilities while being technologically cost effective. Researchers have developed a novel control architecture that defends complex, interconnected systems previously vulnerable to cyberattacks. (2020-10-26)

Why is fertilizer used in explosives? (video)
Over the last century, the compound ammonium nitrate has been involved in at least 30 disasters and terrorist attacks. Under normal circumstances, it's totally harmless and used in things like fertilizer, so what makes ammonium nitrate turn deadly?: https://youtu.be/-SeT3N3A19c. (2020-10-22)

Plants communicate at a molecular level
Working together with researchers from the University of Tübingen, the University of Tromsø, the UC Davis and the Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich, biologists from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have discovered how tomato plants identify Cuscuta as a parasite. The plant has a protein in its cell walls that is identified as 'foreign' by a receptor in the tomato. (2020-10-20)

Recovery from grief is a slow, difficult process for families of terrorism victims
People who lose loved ones to terrorism are at a particularly high risk of developing Prolonged Grief Disorder, a condition characterized by severe and persistent longing for the deceased and reduced functioning in daily life. Researchers assessed grief in parents and siblings of those killed in the 2011 terrorist attacks in Norway, and found that nearly 80% of study participants experienced a high level of grief and either no sign or a slow recovery. (2020-10-14)

A new toolkit for capturing how COVID-19 impacts crime
A new set of assessment tools shows promise in capturing how the COVID-19 pandemic affects patterns of criminal activity. Hervé Borrion of University College London, U.K., and colleagues present this toolkit in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on October 14. (2020-10-14)

Are brain-computer interface spellers secure?
Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs), which aim to construct a pathway for people to interact with computers directly by thought, have received great attention in recent years. An electroencephalogram-based BCI speller, which allows the user to input text to computer using brain signals, is one of the most popular BCI systems. However, researchers in China show that these BCI spellers can be easily attacked, exposing a critical security concern in EEG-based BCI systems. (2020-10-03)

Study: Unnecessary stress testing performed prior to knee and hip replacement surgeries
A new study out of the University of Chicago Medicine shows the overall rate of preoperative stress testing for hip and knee replacements is and has been decreasing consistently since 2006. Still, researchers found, 30,000 out of every 100,000 stress tests performed each year were unnecessary, as the tests didn't decrease the frequency of complications such as heart attacks or stopped hearts. (2020-10-01)

COVID-19 shapes political approval ratings
During the early days of the pandemic, COVID-19 created a rally effect around political leaders, according to a large-scale study published Sept. 24, 2020. The rise of COVID-19 cases was associated with a 15- to 20-point boost in approval for United States governors and an average 14-point gain for world leaders. It's unclear how long the effect lasts, but the health crisis might be a catalyst to help incumbent governments win re-election. (2020-09-24)

Recurrent heart attacks on the decline, yet risk remains high
After surviving a heart attack, the proportion of patients experiencing a repeat attack within a year fell between 2008 and 2017, with the greatest decline in women. Despite the improvement, the rate of recurrent heart attacks, or artery-opening procedures, heart failure hospitalizations and deaths within a year remain high in heart attack survivors. Steps should be taken to ensure that men and women receive the risk-lowering care recommended in professional guidelines. (2020-09-21)

Tracking the working dogs of 9/11
A study of search and rescue dogs led by the School of Veterinary Medicine showed little difference in longevity or cause of death between dogs at the disaster site and dogs in a control group. (2020-09-21)

Popular messenger services are extremely insecure
Researchers from the Technical University of Darmstadt and the University of Würzburg show that popular mobile messengers expose personal data via discovery services that allow users to find contacts based on phone numbers from their address book. (2020-09-15)

Asthma patients given risky levels of steroid tablets
More than one quarter of asthma patients have been prescribed potentially dangerous amounts of steroid tablets, with researchers warning this puts them at greater risk of serious side-effects. (2020-09-13)

Study provides hope for young women after heart attack
Premenopausal women have good long-term outcomes after a heart attack, according to late breaking research presented today at ESC Congress 2020. (2020-08-30)

Risk of heart attacks halves in patients with diabetes in 15 years
Dramatic reductions in the risk of heart attacks in patients with diabetes coincides with major increases in the use of preventive medications. That's the finding of late breaking research presented today at ESC Congress 2020. 'Our results suggest that when patients are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, starting medications to prevent cardiovascular disease has a substantial impact on the risk of heart attacks and premature death,' said principal investigator Dr. Christine Gyldenkerne of Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. (2020-08-29)

New method to combat damage, help revive NY berry industry
Greg Loeb of Cornell University has been experimenting with a thin mesh covering, called exclusion netting, around berry crops as a means to prevent spotted wing drosophila infestation. The efficacy of the netting is documented in a paper, 'Factors Affecting the Implementation of Exclusion Netting to Control Drosophila Suzukii on Primocane Raspberry,' published in the journal Crop Protection. (2020-08-26)

Scan for arterial plaque is better at predicting heart attack than stroke
The amount of calcified plaque in the heart's arteries is a better predictor of future heart attacks than of strokes, with similar findings across sex and racial groups, according to new research from UT Southwestern. (2020-08-18)

New method to defend against smart home cyber attacks developed by Ben-Gurion University researchers
According to their new study published in Computers & Security, the ability to launch massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks via a botnet of compromised devices is an exponentially growing risk in the Internet of Things (IoT). Such massive attacks, possibly emerging from IoT devices in home networks, impact the attack target, as well as the infrastructure of telecommunication service providers (telcos). (2020-08-03)

Media coverage fostered support for gun control in wake of NZ mosque shootings
Media coverage of the March 2019 Christchurch mosque shootings contributed to an increase in public support for gun control, a study by researchers at the University of Otago, Wellington has found. (2020-07-28)

Levothyroxine doesn't improve cardiac function for heart attack patients
Tens of thousands of patients with underactive thyroid are being prescribed Levothyroxine after a heart attack - but the results a of a double-blind randomised clinical trial has shown that it offers no benefits to their heart function. The researchers, led by Dr Salman Razvi at Newcastle University, UK, are now working to change the international guidelines on treatment. (2020-07-21)

Cyber expert on 'insider threat' attacks
Dr Duncan Hodges, Senior Lecturer in Cyberspace Operations, Cranfield University, is actively researching insider threats such as the recent Twitter attack. He and researcher Katie Paxton-Fear are presenting this paper Understanding Insider Threat Attacks Using Natural Language Processing, at the HCI International Conference on Thursday 23 July 2020 1400 CEST.  (2020-07-20)

Opium linked with more deaths after bypass surgery
The largest study on opium use and outcomes after bypass surgery has found that - in contrast to widely held beliefs - it is linked with more deaths and heart attacks. The research is published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that in 2015, 17.7 million people used opiates (opium, heroin, and morphine) illicitly worldwide. (2020-07-16)

Polarized tweets reveal deep divisions in congressional COVID-19 messaging
An analysis of COVID-19-related tweets issued by members of Congress from January 17 through March 31, 2020 finds that Democrats and Republicans quickly polarized along party lines in their messaging about the virus on Twitter. The findings underscore the lack of political consensus as the crisis ballooned (2020-06-24)

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