Current Threat News and Events

Current Threat News and Events, Threat News Articles.
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COVID-19 health threat increases psychological distress among Black Americans
A new University of Georgia study examines the interplay between the perceptions of coronavirus threat and psychological distress among Black Americans. (2021-02-04)

Ostriches challenged by temperature fluctuations
The world's largest bird, the ostrich, has problems reproducing when the temperature deviates by 5 degrees or more from the ideal temperature of 20 °C. The research, from Lund University in Sweden, is published in Nature Communications. (2021-02-03)

The quick choice might be a choice-overload avoidance strategy
Making a choice quickly might appear effortless, but University at Buffalo research that measured cardiovascular responses in the moment of making a choice, rather than after-the-fact, suggests that the apparent swift certainty might instead be a defense from having to think too deeply about the choices being presented to them. (2021-02-03)

Sub-surface imaging technology can expose counterfeit travel documents
New research by the University of Kent has found that optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technology can be utilised to distinguish between legitimate and counterfeit travel documents. (2021-02-02)

Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance could be more challenging outside of the EU
In a new policy report from the Microbiology Society, experts from around the UK explain the desperate need for long-term and ambitious funding for surveillance and research into antimicrobial resistance (AMR). (2020-12-21)

The use of wild mammals in traditional medicine
In an analysis of published research, investigators identified 565 mammalian species that have been used to source products used in traditional medicine around the world, especially in Asia, Africa, and Latin America (2020-12-09)

I see you: Honey bees use contagious and honest visual signal to deter attacking hornets
What do honey bees and deadly hornets have to do with issues surrounding ''fake news?'' UC San Diego-led research is providing new details about honey bees and their defenses against preying hornets. Using a common iPad, James Nieh and his colleagues conducted the first study that demonstrates that a contagious warning signal counters ''fake news'' in social insects. (2020-12-07)

Waste fishing gear threatens Ganges wildlife
Waste fishing gear in the River Ganges poses a threat to wildlife including otters, turtles and dolphins, new research shows. (2020-11-25)

Here's why conservatives and liberals differ on COVID-19
According to a new study from Lehigh Business, the differences between conservative and liberal responses to COVID-19 are mitigated when people perceive the virus itself to have agency -- the ability to control its own actions and thus exert power over people. Conservatives are generally more sensitive to threats that are relatively high in agency, say researchers with Lehigh University's College of Business and KU Leuven, Belgium. (2020-11-13)

Conservatives and liberals motivated by different psychological factors, new study shows
Liberalism and conservatism are associated with qualitatively different psychological concerns, notably those linked to morality, shows a new study that explores how political ideology and moral values are connected to motivated social cognition. (2020-11-11)

New research identifies 'triple trouble' for mangrove coasts
Some of the world's most valuable ecosystems are facing a ''triple threat'' to their long-term durability and survival, new research shows. (2020-11-10)

Should I run, or should I not? The neural basis of aggression and flight
Researchers in the Gross group at EMBL Rome have investigated the mechanism behind defensive behaviour in mice. They have identified a specific area of the brain that encodes both spatial and threat cues to drive location-specific defensive responses. (2020-10-29)

Swiss fatalism protects against negative feelings in the pandemic
Trust or disappointment in government crisis management is an important factor for the general mood, shows a study by the University of Zurich based on surveys in Israel and Switzerland. At the end of April, Israelis were twice as disappointed with their government institutions during the pandemic as Swiss citizens. In Switzerland, a certain fatalism made for less negative feelings. (2020-10-27)

Single brain region links depression and anxiety, heart disease, and treatment sensitivity
Over-activity in a single brain region called the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) underlies several key symptoms of mood and anxiety disorders, but an antidepressant only successfully treats some of the symptoms. A new study, published today in the journal Nature Communications, suggests that sgACC is a crucial region in depression and anxiety, and targeted treatment based on a patient's symptoms could lead to better outcomes. (2020-10-26)

Aerial images detect and track food security threats for millions of African farmers
New research shows how a combination of imagery from mobile phones, drones and satellites can be used to clamp down on banana threats. The images of varying resolutions are fed into a platform 'trained' through machine learning to identify banana crops and analyze threats with 97% overall accuracy. (2020-10-22)

UMD-led study shows fear and anxiety share same bases in brain
The report by an international team of researchers led by Alexander Shackman, an associate professor of psychology at UMD, and Juyoen Hur, an assistant professor of psychology at Yonsei University in Seoul, South Korea, provides new evidence that fear and anxiety reflect overlapping brain circuits. The findings run counter to popular scientific accounts, highlighting the need for a major theoretical reckoning. (2020-10-19)

How consumers responded to COVID-19
The coronavirus pandemic has been a catalyst for laying out the different threats that consumers face, and that consumers must prepare themselves for a constantly shifting landscape moving forward. A new study sets a framework for researchers to explore these topics and identify the needs of consumers during disruptive times. (2020-10-12)

Scientists unpack how the brain separates present from past dangers
A team of neuroscientists has identified processes the brain undergoes to distinguish real and present dangers from those linked to past experiences in mice. The findings have implications for our understanding of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). (2020-10-07)

New study reveals one way police officers can reduce shooting errors
In a new research paper published in Police Quarterly, University of Colorado Denver School of Public Affairs Assistant Professor Paul Taylor found officers can significantly improve shoot/no-shoot decisions by simply lowering the position of their firearm. (2020-10-05)

The overlap between fear and anxiety brain circuits
Fear and anxiety reflect overlapping brain circuits, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. The findings highlight a need to reevaluate the existing models guiding anxiety research. (2020-09-21)

Monitoring and reporting framework to protect World Heritage Sites from invasive species
A team of international scientists have devised a new monitoring and reporting framework to help protect World Heritage Sites from almost 300 different invasive alien species globally including, rats (Rattus spp.), cats (Felis catus), lantana (Lantana camara) and Argentine ants (Linepithema humile). (2020-09-01)

All that glitters is not gold: Misuse of AI by big tech can harm developing countries
The debate on the risks and benefits of Artificial Intelligence (AI) is still ongoing, but one thing is certain: without appropriate regulatory measures, AI is potentially dangerous. A recent study explores how AI can be a threat to the society, especially developing nations, if left unregulated. The study also talks about why AI should comply with the Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations, to ensure that it benefits the society as a whole. (2020-08-27)

Big mammals at higher risk of extinction in world's poorest countries, study reveals
A review, which looks at 81 studies carried out between 1980 and 2020, has found that illegal hunting is causing worrying declines in the big mammal populations of protected areas across the globe, and particularly in poorer countries. (2020-08-24)

Scientists discover a social cue of safety
Are you in danger? Looking at how others behave is one of the ways social animals, such as humans, find the answer. Even though the existence of social cues of danger is well known, no social cues of safety have been identified until just now. (2020-08-21)

Sea-level rise linked to higher water tables along California coast
Researchers modeled the effects of rising sea levels along the California coast. While results varied with local topography, the study indicates an increased threat to populated areas already at risk from rising water tables, and the possibility of flooding in unexpected inland areas. (2020-08-21)

Plastic debris releases potentially harmful chemicals into seabird stomach fluid
A recent study has found that plastic ingested by northern fulmars, a common seabird, could release potentially toxic chemicals in their stomachs. Using plastic waste from the shore and stomach fluid from fulmars, the researchers closely mimicked fulmar plastic consumption. The findings highlight that plastic waste in the sea not only poses physical risks for seabirds, but could also have toxic effects. (2020-08-19)

SMART researchers find new way to make bacteria more sensitive to antibiotics
Researchers from SMART have discovered a new way to reverse antibiotic resistance in some bacteria using hydrogen sulphide (H2S). By adding H2S releasing compounds to Acinetobacter baumannii - a pathogenic bacteria that does not produce H2S on its own - they found that exogenous H2S sensitised the A. baumannii to multiple antibiotic classes. It was even able to reverse acquired resistance in A. baumannii to gentamicin. (2020-08-12)

Herbivorous vertebrates may face most daunting extinction risk
Herbivores -- not predators -- may face a higher risk of extinction among mammals, birds, and reptiles, according to a new study of more than 44,000 living and extinct species. The findings suggest herbivores have consistently suffered the highest threat of extinction in the present day, the recent past, and the late Pleistocene - more so than species from any other position. (2020-08-05)

Waning attention to climate change amid pandemic could have lasting effects
With COVID-19 dominating the headlines, searches for climate change are on the decline. That worries authors of a new study showing that even brief, involuntary attention to environmental issues moves people to care more and act. (2020-08-05)

Study: Experiencing childhood trauma makes body and brain age faster
Children who suffer trauma from abuse or violence early in life show biological signs of aging faster than children who have never experienced adversity, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. The study examined three different signs of biological aging -- early puberty, cellular aging and changes in brain structure -- and found that trauma exposure was associated with all three. (2020-08-03)

Disposed PPE could be turned into biofuel, shows new COVID-19 study
Plastic from used personal protective equipment (PPE) can, and should, be transformed into renewable liquid fuels - according to a new study, published in the peer-reviewed Taylor & Francis journal Biofuels. (2020-08-03)

Study: COVID-19 pandemic has negatively influenced subjective well-being
The COVID-19 pandemic has also affected many people's subjective well-being. This is the result of a long-term study involving 979 people from Germany conducted by psychologists from Leipzig University and Saint Louis University. It found that in the early stage of the pandemic average life satisfaction and the experience of positive feelings decreased significantly. The findings have now been published in ''American Psychologist'' (2020-07-28)

Life in the shallows becomes a trap for baby sharks
Baby reef sharks tolerate living in the sometimes-extreme environments of their nurseries -- but these habitats face an uncertain future which may leave newborn sharks 'trapped'. (2020-07-21)

How immune cells activate the killer mode
Freiburg researchers find missing link in immune response. (2020-07-20)

Cyber expert on 'insider threat' attacks
Dr Duncan Hodges, Senior Lecturer in Cyberspace Operations, Cranfield University, is actively researching insider threats such as the recent Twitter attack. He and researcher Katie Paxton-Fear are presenting this paper Understanding Insider Threat Attacks Using Natural Language Processing, at the HCI International Conference on Thursday 23 July 2020 1400 CEST.  (2020-07-20)

A novel comprehensive model tackles arcane PTSD differences in neural activity
Toshinori Chiba (ATR) and his collaborators have proposed an innovative new ''Reciprocal Inhibition Model'' of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which may aid considerably in its treatment. This model comprehensively explains the inhomogeneous nature of PTSD by addressing inter- and intra-patient variabilities at the neural, attentional, and symptom levels. This model may therefore pave the way for individual-tailored clinical PTSD treatment. (2020-07-19)

Study shows how traumatic experiences can leave their mark on a person's eyes
New research by Welsh academics shows that a patient's pupils can reveal if they have suffered a traumatic experience in the past. The study examined how an individual's eyes responded when shown threatening images. (2020-07-17)

Why governments have the right to require masks in public
Requirements for consumers to wear masks at public places like retail stores and restaurants are very similar to smoking bans, according to three university experts. In a paper published today (July 16, 2020) in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, the professors say mask requirements to stop the spread of COVID-19 should be considered ''fundamental occupational health protections'' for workers at stores, restaurants and other public places. (2020-07-16)

New technique in which drugs make bacteria glow could help fight antibiotic resistance
A new technique could help reduce antibiotic prescribing by predicting which drugs could be effective in fighting bacteria within minutes. (2020-07-02)

Pregnancy stereotypes can lead to workplace accidents
A study of pregnant women in physically demanding jobs found that their fears of confirming stereotypes about pregnant workers as incompetent, weak or less committed to their job could drive them to work extra hard, risking injury. (2020-06-29)

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