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Current Threat News and Events, Threat News Articles.
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Closer threats inspire a more primitive kind of fear
Your brain handles a perceived threat differently depending on how close it is to you. If it's far away, you engage more problem-solving areas of the brain. But up close, your animal instincts jump into action and there isn't as much reasoning. And that is probably what makes it harder to extinguish the fear of a close-up threat and more likely that you'll have some long-term stress from the experience. (2020-06-29)

FSU researchers find resilience, not loneliness in nationwide study of pandemic respon
Social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic has not led to an overall increase in loneliness among Americans. That's the takeaway from a comprehensive, nationwide study by Florida State University College of Medicine researchers who surveyed more than 2,000 people before and during the enactment of stay-at-home policies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-06-22)

Five steps to stop the death of the most threatened birds of prey
A new study presents a new five-step protocol to mitigate the mortality of birds of prey due to accidents with infrastructures (power lines, etc.) and other unnatural causes. The protocol that could also be applied to the conservation of other terrestrial vertebrates is a new scientific contribution from the Conservation Biology Group , led by the lecturer Joan Real, from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the University of Barcelona. (2020-06-18)

National tick surveillance survey identifies gaps to be filled
New Cornell-led research shows that inadequate funding is the main barrier to better surveillance and control of ticks, including the blacklegged tick, which spreads Lyme disease, the No. 1 vector-borne illness in the country. (2020-06-17)

COVID-19: Relationship between social media use and prejudice against Chinese Americans
The novel coronavirus pandemic that originated in China has created a backlash in the United States against Asian Americans. Researchers in New Zealand found a strong relationship between the pandemic, social media use and prejudice. Gender appears to play a significant role in predicting whether someone reacts more intellectually or emotionally to perceived threats from a minority population. (2020-06-12)

Research links personality traits to toilet paper stockpiling
People who feel more threatened by COVID-19 and rank highly on scales of emotionality and conscientiousness were most likely to stockpile toilet paper in March 2020, according to a new study by Theo Toppe of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and colleagues. (2020-06-12)

Government health, safety regulations backfire with conservatives, study shows
A new study from the University of Notre Dame shows government-imposed restrictions can backfire, depending on political ideology. (2020-06-10)

Infected insects may warn of impending citrus disease a year in advance
Despite the first appearance of citrus greening disease in Florida in 2005, the bacterium wasn't found in Texas until 2011, when scientists detected it in the psyllids. The disease was not detected in citrus years until 2012, suggesting that psyllids may actually be used for early detection of the HLB pathogen in newly invaded areas. (2020-06-09)

Unexpected uncertainty can breed paranoia, researchers find
In times of unexpected uncertainty, such as the sudden appearance of a global pandemic, people may be more prone to paranoia, Yale University researchers suggest in a new study published in the journal eLife. (2020-06-09)

Threats to global food security from emerging fungal crop pathogens
Amongst the world's most challenging problems is the need to feed an ever-growing global population sustainably. (2020-06-08)

Bees grooming each other can boost colony immunity
Honeybees that specialise in grooming their nestmates (allogroomers) to ward off pests play a central role in the colony, finds a new UCL and University of Florence study published in Scientific Reports. (2020-06-02)

Heart surgery stalled as COVID-19 spread
In two recent journal articles, Dr. Marc Ruel explores how hospitals worldwide scaled back on heart surgeries as the pandemic hit, and how they can resume those operations in a world still plagued by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. (2020-05-28)

Finding working capital is key to small businesses efforts as reopening accelerates
Small businesses are suffering affer a long pandemic shutdown and they are worried about what will be needed as they begin to reopen. Interviews with a select group of small business owners found that access to working capital is key to reopening, as well as clear guidance from government or trade organizations about how to reopen safely during the pandemic. (2020-05-27)

How social media platforms can contribute to dehumanizing people
A recent analysis of discourse on Facebook highlights how social media can be used to dehumanize entire groups of people. (2020-05-20)

Economists: Lack of COVID-19 preparedness in line with previous findings
The threat of a catastrophic pandemic in 2014 -- the West African Ebola outbreak -- did little to change the perception of US citizens regarding the importance of preparing for future outbreaks, (2020-05-14)

IU School of Medicine study tracks COVID-19 spread in pediatric dialysis unit
As COVID-19 continues its sweep around the globe, dialysis units have continued to be hotspots for the virus' spread. Researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine hope to combat that threat, through a novel study published in JAMA. The study, conducted by members of the Pediatric Nephrology Dialysis Unit at Riley Hospital for Children at IU Health, used antibody testing on patients, doctors, nurses and staff within the unit to track symptomatic and asymptomatic spread in a confined space. (2020-05-14)

New evidence suggests malaria cycles are innate to the organism
Scientists from the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research joined partners to publish a study providing clear evidence that malaria's characteristic cycle of fever and chills is a result of the parasite's own influence -- not factors from the host. Though the specific signals utilized remain to be elucidated, these findings raise the exciting possibility of disrupting this cycle as an antimalarial strategy. (2020-05-14)

In victory over polio, hope for the battle against COVID-19
Medicine's great triumph over polio holds out hope we can do the same for COVID-19, two researchers say. (2020-05-13)

New test identifies lobster hybrids
Scientists have developed a test that can identify hybrids resulting from crossbreeding between European and American lobsters. (2020-05-11)

Software flaws often first reported on social media networks, PNNL researchers find
Software vulnerabilities are more likely to be discussed on social media before they're revealed on a government reporting site, a practice that could pose a national security threat, according to computer scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. (2020-05-04)

Asteroid visiting Earth's neighborhood brings its own face mask
The Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico is following an asteroid approaching Earth this week and while it poses no threat, it appears to know our planet is facing a pandemic. (2020-04-23)

Protecting yourself from the latest internet sex crime
Researchers from Michigan State University released a study on 'sextortion' -- a lesser-known internet crime that poses a threat to adults and minors -- that sheds light on the importance of protecting the public from online criminals. (2020-04-21)

USDA-ARS scientists find new tool to combat major wheat disease
Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their colleagues have discovered a gene that can be used to develop varieties of wheat that will be more resistant to a disease that is a major threat both overseas and to the nation's $10 billion annual wheat crop. (2020-04-10)

Researchers assess bird flu virus subtypes in China
The avian influenza virus subtype H16N3 is currently detectable in many countries. To examine the potential threat to humans of H16N3, researchers recently performed an extensive avian influenza surveillance in major wild bird gatherings across China from 2017-2019. The findings are published in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases. (2020-04-08)

When warblers warn of cowbirds, blackbirds get the message
This is the story of three bird species and how they interact. The brown-headed cowbird lays its eggs in other birds' nests and lets them raise its young -- often at the expense of the host's nestlings. To combat this threat, yellow warblers have developed a special 'seet' call that means, 'Look out! Cowbird!' In a new study, researchers report that red-winged blackbirds respond to the seet call as if they know what it means. (2020-03-31)

Ocean deoxygenation: A silent driver of coral reef demise?
Authors of a new study published in Nature Climate Change say the threat of ocean deoxygenation has largely been ignored and asks the question: 'Are our coastal coral reefs slowly suffocating?' (2020-03-31)

Vibes before it bites: 10 types of defensive behaviour for the false coral snake
The False Coral Snake (Oxyrhopus rhombifer) may be capable of recognising various threat levels and demonstrates ten different defensive behaviours, seven of which are registered for the first time for the species. Scientists from the Federal University of Vi├žosa (Brazil) published their laboratory observation results based on a juvenile specimen in the open-access journal Neotropical Biology and Conservation. (2020-03-23)

Unraveling the puzzle of Madagascar's forest cats
Michelle Sauther has long wondered where Madagascar's mysterious wild cats came from. Now, new genetic evidence delivers an answer. (2020-03-16)

Lab-free infection test could eliminate guesswork for doctors
A new infection test, made up of sheets of paper patterned by lasers, has been developed by University of Southampton researchers to allow diagnosis at the point of care -- helping doctors give patients the right treatment, faster. (2020-02-25)

Parasitic worms have armies, and produce more soldiers when needed
In a new study published Feb. 26, 2020 in Biology Letters, the research team demonstrated for the first time that the number of soldiers in a trematode colony depends on the local invasion threat, showing that such societies produce greater standing armies in areas of greater threat. This has big implications for understanding how animal societies determine their resource allocation. (2020-02-25)

Double success for University drug resistance research
Swansea University research into the threat posed by antifungal drug resistance has been highlighted in two prestigious international journals. (2020-02-14)

University of Montana researchers study how birds retweet news
Every social network has its fake news. And in animal communication networks, even birds discern the trustworthiness of their neighbors, a study from the University of Montana suggests. (2020-02-14)

Invasive species that threaten biodiversity on the Antarctic Peninsula are identified
Mediterranean mussels, seaweed and some species of land plants and invertebrates are among the 13 species that are most likely to damage the ecosystems on the Antarctic Peninsula. (2020-02-12)

Studies on mass shootings assess trends, gauge effectiveness, and recommend policies
In the last decade, thousands have been killed as a result of mass violence. Such acts take many forms, yet it is indiscriminate mass public shootings that has generated the most public alarm. Now, 41 scholars have contributed 16 articles on the topic. The articles assess trends in mass violence and gauge the effectiveness of measures to prevent instances of mass shootings and reduce their lethality. The issue also includes research-based policy recommendations to limit the harm from such violence. (2020-02-06)

First-ever experimental Sudan virus specific antibody treatment protects animals
Army scientists working with partners from industry and academia have developed an experimental treatment that protects animals from Sudan virus, which is closely related to Ebola. Their work is published online today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2020-02-03)

Horror movies manipulate brain activity expertly to enhance excitement
Finnish research team maps neural activity in response to watching horror movies. A study conducted by the University of Turku shows the top horror movies of the past 100 years, and how they manipulate brain activity. (2020-01-24)

URI biologist provides framework for national invasive species policy, implementation
A special issue of the journal Biological Invasions, co-edited by University of Rhode Island ecologist Laura Meyerson and University of Tennessee biologist Daniel Simberloff, provides a pathway to strengthening national policies and implementing strategies for addressing a growing threat to national security - invasive species. (2020-01-23)

Biologists recommend urgent action to protect California spotted owls
In the Pacific Northwest, the range expansion of barred owls has contributed to a conservation crisis for northern spotted owls, which are being displaced from their habitat. How will this interaction play out in the Sierra Nevada, where barred owls are starting to move into the range of the California spotted owl? New research suggests that wildlife managers may still be able to head off similar problems in the Golden State -- if they act now. (2020-01-22)

Hopkins news: Climate change could unlock new microbes and increase heat-related deaths
The Journal of Clinical Investigation (JCI) recently published 'Viewpoint' articles by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine professors who warn that global climate change is likely to unlock dangerous new microbes, as well as threaten humans' ability to regulate body temperature. (2020-01-22)

How bacterial evolution of antibiotic arsenals is providing new drug blueprints
Scientists have taken their cue from nature to provide new options for drug designers seeking to hold back the global threat of antimicrobial resistance. The scientists have blueprinted how two antibiotics produced by bacteria function against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to pinpoint potential new drug targets. (2020-01-09)

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