Current Tigers News and Events

Current Tigers News and Events, Tigers News Articles.
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Increasingly fragmented tiger populations may require 'genetic rescue'
A new study reveals the lasting genetic impacts of increased isolation among different tiger subpopulations. (2021-02-18)

New revelations of tiger genomes
A new study reveals differences in the genomic history of tiger subspecies, pointing to the importance of understanding evolutionary history for future conservation (2021-02-18)

New discovery sheds light on the mysterious family life of notorious sabre-toothed tiger
New research indicates adolescent offspring of the menacing sabre-toothed predator, Smilodon fatalis, were more momma's cubs than independent warriors. (2021-01-07)

Why do elephants and tigers still roam in India? Study offers clues
A study documenting four extinctions of large mammals on the Indian Subcontinent sheds light on why elephants, tigers, and rhinos still roam there. (2020-12-08)

3D protein modeling suggests why COVID-19 infects some animals, but not others
Some animals are more susceptible to Covid-19 infection than others, and new research suggests this may be due to distinctive structural features of a protein found on the surface of animal cells. João Rodrigues of Stanford University, California, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology. (2020-12-03)

Understanding traditional Chinese medicine can help protect species
Demystifying traditional Chinese medicine for conservationists could be the key to better protecting endangered species like pangolins, tigers and rhino, according to University of Queensland-led researchers. UQ PhD candidate Hubert Cheung said efforts to shift entrenched values and beliefs about Chinese medicine are not achieving conservation gains in the short term. (2020-11-26)

Big cats and small dogs: solving the mystery of canine distemper in wild tigers
Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes a serious disease in domestic dogs, and also infects other carnivores, including threatened species like the Amur tiger. It is often assumed that domestic dogs are the primary source of CDV, but in a new Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine study found that other local wildlife was the primary source of CDV transmission to tigers instead. (2020-11-23)

A deadly long-distance hunter: DNA study reveals insights about the scimitar-toothed cat
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have mapped the entire nuclear genome of a sabre-toothed cat. The genetic study reveals new insights about a socially intelligent pack animal, specialized in endurance-based hunting over long distances. (2020-10-15)

Dozens of mammals could be susceptible to SARS-CoV-2
Numerous animals may be vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, according to a large study modelling how the virus might infect different animals' cells, led by UCL researchers, published in Scientific Reports. (2020-10-05)

Study shows SARS-CoV-2 jumped between people and mink, providing strong evidence of zoonotic transmission
A study investigating SARS-CoV-2 infections across 16 mink farms in the Netherlands, being presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online from 23-25 September) shows that the virus likely jumped between people and mink and back, providing strong evidence that animal to human (zoonotic) transmission is possible. (2020-09-17)

The surprising rhythms of Leopards: Females are early birds, males are nocturnal
After 10 months of camera surveillance in the Tanzanian rainforest, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have become the first to conclude that female and male leopards are active at very different times of the day. The discovery contradicts previous assumptions and could be used to help protect the endangered feline, whose populations have dwindled by 85 percent over the past century. (2020-09-10)

Humans, not climate, have driven rapidly rising mammal extinction rate
Human impact can explain ninety-six percent of all mammal species extinctions of the last hundred thousand years, according to a new study published in the scientific journal Science Advances. (2020-09-09)

Protected areas can 'double' imperilled species populations
A University of Queensland-led research team has revealed that many endangered mammal species are dependent on protected areas, and would likely vanish without them. Professor James Watson, of UQ and the Wildlife Conservation Society, said despite the success of protected areas, their popularity as a go-to conservation tool has started to wane. (2020-09-06)

Consumption of products derived from vulnerable wildlife species pervasive in Laos
A new study of wildlife consumption in northern Laos by San Diego Zoo Global researchers found widespread use of products made from sun bears, Asiatic bears and serows--goat-like mammals found throughout Asia--among other vulnerable species. The findings indicate that efforts are needed to reduce the unsustainable harvest of bears and serows, in particular, 'before this demand becomes a significant conservation challenge,' the authors wrote. (2020-07-01)

Thousands of miles of planned Asian roads threaten the heart of tiger habitat
Nearly 15,000 miles of new Asian roads will be built in tiger habitat by mid-century, deepening the big cat's extinction risk and highlighting the need for bold new conservation measures now, according to a new study. (2020-04-29)

Local community involvement crucial to restoring tropical peatlands
New research has found that local community involvement is crucial to restoring Indonesia's peatlands -- unspoilt peatlands act as a carbon sink and play an important role in reducing global carbon emissions. They are also a crucial habitat for birds and animals, including endangered species such as orang-utans and tigers. (2020-03-26)

Christmas Island discovery redraws map of life
The world's animal distribution map will need to be redrawn and textbooks updated, after researchers discovered the existence of 'Australian' species on Christmas Island. The University of Queensland's Professor Jonathan Aitchison said the finding revises the long-held understanding of the location of one of biology and geography's most significant barriers - the Wallace line. (2020-03-22)

Camera trap study captures Sumatran tigers, clouded leopards, other rare beasts
Scientists deployed motion-sensitive camera traps across a 50-square-mile swath of Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park in southern Sumatra and, over the course of eight years, recorded the haunts and habits of dozens of species, including the Sumatran tiger and other rare and endangered wildlife. Their observations offer insight into how abundant these species are and show how smaller creatures avoid being eaten by tigers and other carnivores. (video available.) (2020-02-24)

Size matters! What drives zoo attendance and how does footfall impact conservation?
Conserving species in the wild remains the gold standard but there is an increasing relevance and importance to the role played by the thousands of zoos and aquariums across the globe in supporting conservation in the wild. This study provides global evidence to suggest that zoos don't need to compromise their economic viability and entertainment value in order to have a significant value to conservation. (2020-02-04)

Zoo improvements should benefit all animals
Zoo improvements should benefit all animals and include a wide range of 'enrichment' techniques, researchers say. (2020-01-31)

Study: yes, even wild tigers struggle with work/life balance
A new study by a team of Russian and American scientists revealed the first-ever detailed analysis of a tigress from the birth of her cubs through their first four months. (2019-12-19)

New 'netherworldly' freshwater fish named for Thai conservation visionary
Garra surinbinnani looks like a stout, brown minnow with the face of a boxer who's gone one too many rounds. The species makes its home in the fast-flowing, rocky streams of Western Thailand, a region that its namesake, the late conservationist Surin Binnan, devoted himself to protecting. (2019-12-16)

Golden ratio observed in human skulls
The Golden Ratio, described by Leonardo da Vinci and Luca Pacioli as the Divine Proportion, is an infinite number often found in nature, art and mathematics. It's a pattern in pinecones, seashells, galaxies and hurricanes. (2019-10-03)

What wolves' teeth reveal about their lives
UCLA biologist discovers what wolves' broken teeth reveal about their lives. (2019-09-24)

Clemson adds 'vampire elephants,' 'ecological zombies' to human-wildlife conflict debate
New research by Clemson University scientists Shari Rodriguez and Christie Sampson in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, examines the effects non-carnivorous species such as feral hogs and elephants can have on humans and livestock and the potential consequences of excluding these animals from research focused on mitigating wildlife impacts on livestock. (2019-08-12)

A hog in wolf's clothing
Most research on human-wildlife conflict has focused on the ways tigers, wolves, and other predators impact livestock even though noncarnivores also threaten livestock. New research by Dr. Shari Rodriguez and Dr. Christie Sampson from Clemson University, publishing August 6, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, examines the effects of these less-studied relationships, particularly for feral hogs and elephants, and the potential consequences of excluding these animals from research focused on mitigating wildlife impacts on livestock. (2019-08-06)

Increasing value of ivory poses major threat to elephant populations
The global price of ivory increased tenfold since its 1989 trade ban by the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), new research has found. The University of Bristol Veterinary School study, published in Biological Conservation [July 25, 2019], is the first to analyse trends in global ivory market values since the ban came into effect. (2019-07-29)

Natural biodiversity protects rural farmers' incomes from tropical weather shocks
A big data study covering more than 7,500 households across 23 tropical countries shows that natural biodiversity could be effective insurance for rural farmers against drought and other weather-related shocks. Farmers in areas with greater biodiversity took less of an income hit from droughts than their peers who farmed amid less biodiversity. (2019-06-27)

Researchers find evolutionary backing in analysis of mammalian vertebrae
Differences in numbers of vertebrae are most extreme in mammals which do not rely on running and leaping, such as those adapted to suspensory locomotion like apes and sloths, a team of anthropologists has concluded. (2019-05-13)

CSI meets conservation
The challenges of collecting DNA samples directly from endangered species makes understanding and protecting them harder. A new approach promises cheap, rapid analysis of genetic clues in degraded and left-behind material, such as hair and commercial food products. (2019-04-10)

Mental health disorders rife in post-conflict areas
A new study has found that 58 percent of people displaced following the civil war in Sri Lanka have suffered mental health problems. (2019-04-01)

Climate change may destroy tiger's home
A James Cook University scientist says the last coastal stronghold of an iconic predator, the endangered Bengal tiger, could be destroyed by climate change and rising sea levels over the next 50 years. (2019-02-10)

Urbanization may hold key to tiger survival
A new WCS-led study published in the journal Biological Conservation says the future of tigers in Asia is linked the path of demographic transition -- for humans. (2019-01-16)

Fifty years of decline in Queensland's coastal sharks
Queensland's coastal shark numbers are continuing a 50-year decline, in sharp contradiction of suggestions of 'exploding' shark populations, according to an analysis of Queensland Shark Control Program data. University of Queensland and Griffith University researchers analyzed data from the program, which has used baited drumlines and nets since 1962 to minimize human-shark interactions, and now spans 1,760 km of the Queensland coastline. (2018-12-13)

Human environmental effects favor cosmopolitan species over local iconic species
Human habitat modification is favoring the same species everywhere, while unique species are disappearing, finds a study publishing on Dec. 4 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, led by Tim Newbold at University College London and Andy Purvis at the Natural History Museum in London. (2018-12-04)

Machine learning helps predict worldwide plant-conservation priorities
A new approach co-developed at The Ohio State University uses data analytics and machine learning to predict the conservation status of more than 150,000 plants worldwide. Results suggest that more than 15,000 species likely qualify as near-threatened, vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered. (2018-12-03)

Animal populations are shrinking due to their high-risk food-finding strategies
A study using animal-attached technology to measure food consumption in four very different wild vertebrates has revealed that animals using a high-risk strategy to find rarer food are particularly susceptible to becoming extinct, as they fail to gather food for their young before they starve. (2018-11-15)

NSU researcher part of team that conducted genome-wide study of tigers
Study brings important context and conclusions to recovery and management strategies for a treasured endangered species, and included subspecies, at high extinction risk. (2018-10-29)

Genome-wide study confirms 6 tiger subspecies
Fewer than 4,000 free-ranging tigers remain in the wild. Efforts to protect these remaining tigers have also been stymied by uncertainty about whether they represent six, five or only two subspecies. Now, researchers who've analyzed the complete genomes of 32 representative tiger specimens confirm that tigers indeed fall into six genetically distinct groups. The findings are reported in Current Biology on Oct. 25. (2018-10-25)

Research methods that find serial criminals could help save tigers
A geographic profiling tool used to catch serial criminals could help reduce the casualties of human-tiger conflict, according to scientists who collaborated on an innovative conservation research study. The results of their research, published in Nature Communications, help explain how villagers in Sumatra coexist with tigers. If used pre-emptively it could have helped cut attacks by half, saving tigers from poaching and retaliation killings. (2018-08-27)

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