Current Titan News and Events

Current Titan News and Events, Titan News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 10 | 381 Results
Testing the waters: Analyzing different solid states of water on other planets and moons
Aside from regular ice, water can exist in the form of peculiar solids called clathrate hydrates, which trap small gaseous molecules. They play a large role in the evolution of atmospheres, but predicting their presence in cryogenic temperatures is difficult. In a recent study, scientists from Okayama University developed statistical mechanics theory to determine their presence in Pluto and some of Jupiter's and Saturn's satellites, providing valuable information to revise existing interpretations. (2021-01-19)

Escape from Mars: how water fled the red planet
Mars once had oceans but is now bone-dry, leaving many to wonder how the water was lost. University of Arizona researchers have discovered a surprisingly large amount of water in the upper atmosphere of Mars, where it is rapidly destroyed, explaining part of this Martian mystery. (2020-11-12)

Triggerfish learns to catch more diverse food
In probably the first observation of its kind, a tricky triggerfish is seen beaching itself before attacking a crab walking along the shoreline. (2020-10-19)

Discovery reveals how plants make cellulose for strength and growth
The discovery unveils the molecular machinery that plants use to weave cellulose chains into cable-like structures called 'microfibrils.' (2020-07-09)

One of the mechanisms of Staphylococcus antibiotic resistance deciphered
The Russian side is represented by Structural Biology Lab (Kazan Federal University) and Institute of Proteins (Russian Academy of Sciences). This particular paper tackles the issue of stress resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. The results can help in finding new antibiotics. (2020-04-07)

Safety zone saves giant moons from fatal plunge
Numerical simulations showed that the temperature gradient in the disk of gas around a young gas giant planet could play a critical role in the development of a satellite system dominated by a single large moon, similar to Titan around Saturn. Researchers found that dust in the circumplanetary disk can create a 'safety zone,' which keeps the moon from falling into the planet as the system evolves. (2020-03-09)

Life on Titan cannot rely on cell membranes, according to computational simulations
Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have made a new contribution to the ongoing search into the possibility of life on Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Using quantum mechanical calculations, they have shown that azotosomes, a proposed alternative to cell membranes, could not form under the conditions there. Their research is published in the journal Science Advances. (2020-03-02)

Galactic cosmic rays affect Titan's atmosphere
Planetary scientists using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) revealed the secrets of the atmosphere of Titan, the largest moon of Saturn. The team found a chemical footprint in Titan's atmosphere indicating that cosmic rays coming from outside the Solar System affect the chemical reactions involved in the formation of nitrogen-bearing organic molecules. This is the first observational confirmation of such processes, and impacts the understanding of the intriguing environment of Titan. (2020-02-14)

Closely spaced hydrogen atoms could facilitate superconductivity in ambient conditions
An international team of researchers discovered the hydrogen atoms in a common metal hydride material are much more tightly spaced than had been predicted for decades--a feature that could possibly facilitate superconductivity at or near room temperature and pressure. The scientists conducted neutron scattering experiments at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory on samples of zirconium vanadium hydride. (2020-02-03)

A study of Saturn's largest moon may offer insights for earth
Scientists studying the weather and climate of Titan, Saturn's largest moon, have reported a significant seasonal variation in its energy budget, a finding which could yield new insights into climate on Earth. (2019-12-03)

Modeling every building in America starts with Chattanooga
A team at Oak Ridge National Laboratory recently used the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility's Cray XK7 Titan supercomputer to model every building serviced by the Electric Power Board of Chattanooga--all 178,368 of them--and discovered through more than 2 million simulations that EPB could potentially save $11-$35 million per year by adjusting electricity usage during peak critical times. (2019-11-13)

Quantum supremacy milestone harnesses ORNL Summit supercomputer
A joint research team from Google Inc., NASA Ames Research Center, and the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has demonstrated that a quantum computer can outperform a classical computer at certain tasks, a feat known as quantum supremacy. (2019-10-23)

University of Hawaii team unravels origin, chemical makeup of Titan's dunes
The UH Manoa team exposed acetylene ice--a chemical that is used on Earth in welding torches and exists at Titan's equatorial regions -- at low temperatures to proxies of high-energy galactic cosmic rays. (2019-10-18)

Supercomputing, neutrons unite to unravel structures of intrinsically disordered protein
Using the Titan supercomputer and the Spallation Neutron Source at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, scientists have created the most accurate 3D model yet of an intrinsically disordered protein, revealing the ensemble of its atomic-level structures. (2019-10-03)

Nitrogen explosions created craters on Saturn moon Titan
Lakes of liquid methane on the surface of Titan, Saturn's largest moon, were likely formed by explosive, pressurized nitrogen just under the moon's surface, according to new research. (2019-09-10)

High-end microscopy reveals structure and function of crucial metabolic enzyme
The enzyme transhydrogenase plays a central role in regulating metabolic processes in animals and humans alike. Malfunction can lead to serious disorders. For the first time, structural biologists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have now visualized and analyzed the enzyme's atomic structure with the support of the institute's newly installed high-end cryo-electron microscope. The data presented in the journal Nature are relevant for the development of currently unavailable therapeutic options. (2019-08-28)

A battery-free sensor for underwater exploration
MIT researchers have developed a battery-free underwater communication system that uses near-zero power to transmit sensor data. The system could be used to monitor sea temperatures to study climate change and track marine life over long periods -- and even sample waters on distant planets. They are presenting the system at the SIGCOMM conference this week, in a paper that has won the conference's 'best paper' award. (2019-08-20)

New, high-resolution images reveal clues to improve anti-nausea drugs for cancer patients
A new study using a special type of electron microscope using samples cooled to extremely cold temperatures provides critical information for drug developers seeking to reduce nausea and vomiting side effects of cancer treatments. Published in Nature Communications, the study offers a glimpse into how widely-used anti-nausea drugs attach to their target protein in the gastrointestinal tract. (2019-07-22)

Super salty, subzero Arctic water provides peek at possible life on other planets
A UW team has discovered thriving communities of bacteria in Alaskan 'cryopegs,' trapped layers of sediment with water so salty that it remains liquid at below-freezing temperatures. The setting may be similar to environments on Mars, Saturn's moon Titan, or other bodies farther from the sun. (2019-07-12)

Key early steps for origin of life occur under a variety of conditions
Potential precursors to life on Earth form from a variety of complex mixtures, according to a team of scientists who say this could point to the development of building blocks crucial to forming genetic molecules for the origins of life on Earth. (2019-07-08)

SMU's 'Titans in a jar' could answer key questions ahead of NASA's space exploration
Researchers from Southern Methodist University (SMU) could help determine if Saturn's icy moon -- Titan -- has ever been home to life long before NASA completes an exploratory visit to its surface by a drone helicopter. (2019-07-03)

'Bathtub rings' around Titan's lakes might be made of alien crystals
The frigid lakeshores of Saturn's moon Titan might be encrusted with strange, unearthly minerals, according to new research being presented at the 2019 Astrobiology Science Conference, June 24-28, co-hosted by AGU and NASA in Bellevue, Wa. (2019-06-24)

Location and brand affect people's trust in cloud services
People's stereotypes regarding different locations around the world influence whether they feel secure in storing their data in cloud service centers in those locations, according to researchers at Penn State, who also found that stereotypes regarding brand authority influence people's trust in cloud services. (2019-05-10)

Researchers find ice feature on Saturn's giant moon
Research team finds huge ice feature on Titan while trying to understand where Saturn's largest moon gets all of its methane. This research, which used Principal Components Analysis in an unconventional way, also validated results from previous Titan missions. (2019-04-29)

Physicists use supercomputers to solve 50-year-old beta decay puzzle
Beta decay plays an indispensable role in the universe. And for 50 years it has held onto a secret that puzzled nuclear physicists. With ever-advancing computing power at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a team of researchers has solved that mystery, with the results appearing in Nature Physics. (2019-03-11)

SwRI scientist sheds light on Titan's mysterious atmosphere
A new Southwest Research Institute study tackles one of the greatest mysteries about Titan, one of Saturn's moons: the origin of its thick, nitrogen-rich atmosphere. The study posits that one key to Titan's mysterious atmosphere is the 'cooking' of organic material in the moon's interior. (2019-01-23)

New study finds evidence of changing seasons, rain on Titan's north pole
An image from the international Cassini spacecraft provides evidence of rainfall on the north pole of Titan, the largest of Saturn's moons. The rainfall would be the first indication of the start of a summer season in the moon's northern hemisphere. (2019-01-16)

Helium exoplanet inflated like a balloon, research shows
Astronomers have discovered a distant planet with an abundance of helium in its atmosphere, which has swollen to resemble an inflated balloon. (2018-12-06)

Scientific research will help to understand the origin of life in the universe
Scientists from Samara University and several universities in the USA have proposed and experimentally confirmed new fundamental chemical mechanisms for the synthesis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The results of this work are presented in the article published in Oct. 8 edition of the scientific journal Nature Astronomy. The described processes make it possible to understand how complex molecules that are related to the origin of life in the universe are formed. (2018-10-18)

Largest galaxy proto-supercluster found
An international team of astronomers using the VIMOS instrument of ESO's Very Large Telescope have uncovered a colossal structure in the early universe. This galaxy proto-supercluster -- which they nickname Hyperion -- was unveiled by new measurements and a complex examination of archive data. This is the largest and most massive structure yet found at such a remote time and distance -- merely 2 billion years after the Big Bang. (2018-10-17)

Scientists present new clues to cut through the mystery of Titan's atmospheric haze
Experiments at Berkeley Lab have helped scientists to zero in on a low-temperature chemical mechanism that may help to explain the complex molecular compounds that make up the nitrogen-rich haze layer surrounding Titan, Saturn's largest moon. (2018-10-08)

Beach sand ripples can be fingerprints for ancient weather conditions
Beach sand ripples can be fingerprints for ancient weather conditions, study shows. (2018-09-27)

By Jove! Methane's effects on sunlight vary by region
Solar energy absorption by methane is 10 times stronger over desert regions such as the Sahara Desert and Arabian Peninsula than elsewhere on Earth, and nearly three times more powerful in the presence of clouds. This result advances science beyond the existing 'global annual-mean estimate' of methane forcing by providing insights into its remarkable spatial variability. This research enabled the first global spatially-resolved calculations of methane forcing, showing strong regional patterns. (2018-09-26)

ZSL names world's largest ever bird -- Vorombe titan
After decades of conflicting evidence and numerous publications, scientists at international conservation charity ZSL's Institute of Zoology, have finally put the 'world's largest bird' debate to rest. Published today in Royal Society Open Science -- Vorombe titan (meaning 'big bird' in Malagasy and Greek), has taken the title reaching weights of up to 800 kg and three meters tall, with the research also discovering unexpected diversity in these Madagascan creatures. (2018-09-25)

Cryo-EM reveals structure of protein responsible for regulating body temperature
A team led by Van Andel Research Institute (VARI) scientists has revealed for the first time the atomic-level structure of TRPM2, a protein that may be a promising drug target for conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and bipolar disorder. (2018-09-24)

Jumping to scientific conclusions challenges biomedical research
Improving experimental design and statistical analyses alone will not solve the reproducibility crisis in science, argues Ray Dingledine in a societal impact article published in eNeuro. Repeating classic behavioral economics experiments with graduate- to senior-level researchers, the author finds scientists of all career stages are subject to the same biases as undergraduates when interpreting data. (2018-09-04)

NASA's MAVEN spacecraft finds that 'stolen' electrons enable unusual aurora on Mars
NASA's MAVEN spacecraft just found a new type of Martian aurora that occurs over much of the day side of the Red Planet, where auroras are very hard to see. (2018-07-23)

Of hearts and giants: Moving a cardiac regulatory protein to the right place
An international research team revealed a nuclear localization role for a conserved short stretch of a cardiac muscle regulator. Mutations within the RSRSP stretch of RBM20 cause the left ventricle to enlarge and weaken, and were shown to interrupt nuclear transport of RBM20, preventing it from controlling a giant spring-like protein of cardiac muscle cells. The findings and animal model developed will pave the way for greater understanding of dilated cardiomyopathy. (2018-06-26)

Got an appetite that won't subside? You've got hungry peptides
The brain's sewer system is a channel of communication that tells you when you are hungry, scientists find. (2018-05-31)

New Horizons data reveals dunes made of methane on Pluto
Dunes are known to form on Earth, Mars, Venus, Titan and Comet 67P -- and now on the dwarf planet Pluto, according to a new study, the latest discovery from New Horizons. (2018-05-31)

Page 1 of 10 | 381 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.