Current Titanium News and Events

Current Titanium News and Events, Titanium News Articles.
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Sweet coating for sour bones
Scientists invent a bioactive coating to improve the function of titanium implants in osteoporotic bones. This coating, comprising a chemically-modified glycan, can sequentially turn on and off inflammation on titanium surface upon implantation. This modulation stimulates the body's immune system to promote bone healing in an effective and safe way, without addition of bone-forming genes or drugs, according to the data from a rat osteoporotic model. (2021-02-12)

A new modifier increases the efficiency of perovskite solar cells
The research team of NUST MISIS has presented an improved structure of perovskite solar cells. Scientists have modified perovskite-based solar cells using MXenes -- thin two-dimensional titanium carbides with high electrical conductivity. The MXenes-based modified cells showed superior performance, with power conversion efficiency exceeding 19% (the reference demonstrated 17%) and improved stabilized power output with respect to reference devices. The results have been published in the Nano energy international scientific journal. (2021-02-09)

Ural Federal University scientists developed a new way of synthesis of high-purity zircon
A research group from Ural Federal University synthesized high-purity single-phase zircon (ZrSiO4) and analyzed its structural, thermal, vibrational and optical properties. The results have been published in the Journal of Solid State Chemistry (Q2) (2021-02-05)

Physicists have developed new material for water desalination
Titanium dioxide nanoparticles decorated by gold absorb about 96% of the solar spectrum and turn it into heat. The material can accelerate the evaporation in desalination plants up to 2.5 times and can track hazardous molecules and compounds. An international research team with representatives from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), ITMO University, and the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, published a related article in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces. (2021-02-01)

National laboratories' look to the future of light sources with new magnet prototype
After more than 15 years of work, scientists at three DOE national laboratories have succeeded in creating and testing an advanced, more powerful superconducting magnet made of niobium and tin for use in the next generation of light sources. (2021-01-28)

Researchers reveal in-situ manipulation of active Au-TiO2 interface
An international joint research team from the Shanghai Advanced Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, along with Zhejiang University and the Technical University of Denmark, reported an in-situ strategy to manipulate interfacial structure with atomic precision during catalytic reactions. (2021-01-28)

Titanium oxide nanotubes facilitate low-cost laser-assisted photoporation
Toyohashi University of Technology developed a nanosecond pulse laser-assisted photoporation method using titanium-oxide nanotubes (TNTs) for highly efficient and low-cost intracellular delivery. HeLa - human cervical cancer cells were cultured in the nanotubes and submerged in a solution of biomolecules. After cells were exposed to nanosecond pulse laser, we successfully delivered propidium iodide (PI) and fluorescent dextran into cells with high efficiency and cell viability. (2021-01-25)

Researchers develop sustainable catalysis process
Acetals are important chemical compounds that are used, for example, in the production of certain medical agents. A new method now makes their synthesis easier and more environmentally friendly. Chemists at the University of Bonn have developed and optimized the sustainable catalytic process. State-of-the-art computer simulations were also used. The reaction is based on a mechanism that frequently occurs in nature, but has rarely been used in chemical synthesis up to now. (2021-01-18)

Covid-19: contaminated surfaces as a risk factor
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic poses a threat to the health of millions of people worldwide. Respiratory viruses, including the pathogen SARS-CoV-2, can be transmitted both via the air and through contact with contaminated objects. Scientists from the Department of Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry at Paderborn University have investigated what promotes the adhesion of viruses to surfaces. This involved examining the proteins that make up the viral envelope. (2020-12-18)

The latest magnesium studies pave the way for new biomedical materials
Materials used in biomedicine must be characterized by controlled biodegradability, sufficient strength and total absence of toxicity to the human body. The search for such materials is, therefore, not a simple task. In this context, scientists have been interested in magnesium for a long time. Recently, using such techniques as positron annihilation spectroscopy, the researchers were able to demonstrate that magnesium subjected to surface mechanical attrition treatment obtains the properties necessary for a biocompatible material. (2020-12-17)

Scientists: Xenon improves properties of maxillofacial and orthopedic implants
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University (TPU) jointly with the colleagues from Siberian State Medical University (SSMU) and Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University (IKBFU) studied the properties of calcium phosphate coatings deposited on titanium implants in various inert gases environment. The researchers managed to discover that the use of xenon positively affects the physicochemical, mechanical and biological properties of the coatings used in oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthopedics and traumatology. (2020-12-15)

Everything you want to know about sunscreen
From safety and effectiveness to who should use sunscreen and how to apply it, Canadian dermatologists review the latest evidence and guidelines on use of sunscreen. The review, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), recommends that everyone older than six months of age should use sunscreen to protect against skin cancer (2020-12-14)

New study helps pinpoint when earth's plate subduction began
According to findings published Dec. 9 in the journal Science Advances, plate subduction could have started 3.75 billion years ago, reshaping Earth's surface and setting the stage for a planet hospitable to life. (2020-12-09)

Way to support effective brain performance after head injury backgrounded by lack of sleep
Scientists from the School of Biomedicine of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) with colleagues from Italy, Spain, Romania, and Sweden suggest a way to protect the brain and minimize neurodegenerative processes after concussion head injuries in the presence of extensive previous sleep deprivation. This methodology is especially important given the retirement-age increase that has recently become an international trend. A related article appears in the Progress in Brain Research journal. (2020-12-08)

A molecule like a nanobattery
How do molecular catalysts function, and what effects do they have? A team of chemical scientists at the University of Oldenburg has come closer to the answers using a model molecule that functions like a molecular nanobattery. It consists of several titanium centres linked to each other by a single layer of interconnected carbon and nitrogen atoms. The researchers' recently published findings combine the results of three multi-year PhD research projects. (2020-12-08)

Titanium atom that exists in two places at once in crystal to blame for unusual phenomenon
Bombarding a crystal with neutrons reveals a quantum quirk that frustrates heat transfer. (2020-12-03)

No nanoparticle risks found in field tests of spray sunscreens
People can continue using mineral-based aerosol sunscreens without fear of exposure to dangerous levels of nanoparticles or other respirable particulates, according to Penn State research published in the journal Aerosol Science and Engineering. (2020-12-02)

A shapeshifting material based on inorganic matter
By embedding titanium-based sheets in water, a group led by scientists from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science has created a material using inorganic materials that can be converted from a hard gel to soft matter using temperature changes, recreating the strange behavior of sea cucumbers. (2020-11-30)

Microswimmers move like moths to the light
The Freigeist group at TU Dresden, led by chemist Dr Juliane Simmchen, has studied an impressive behavior of synthetic microswimmers: as soon as the photocatalytic particles leave an illuminated zone, they flip independently and swim back into the light. This promising observation and its analysis was recently published in the scientific journal ''Soft Matter'' as an ''Emerging Investigator'' article. (2020-11-26)

From lab to industry? Ideally ordered porous titania films, made at scale
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have realized high-throughput production of thin, ordered through-hole membranes of titanium dioxide. Titania layers were grown using anodization on mask-etched titanium before being crystallized. Applying a second anodization, they converted part of the layer back to an amorphous state. The amorphous portion was then selectively dissolved to free the film while leaving the template intact. This paves the way for industrial production of ordered titania membranes for photonics. (2020-11-21)

New insights into memristive devices by combining incipient ferroelectrics and graphene
Scientists are working to create neuromorphic computers, with a design based on the human brain. A crucial component is a memristive device, the resistance of which depends on the history of the device - just like the response of our neurons depends on previous input. Materials scientists from the University of Groningen analysed the behaviour of strontium titanium oxide, a platform material for memristor research and used the 2D material graphene to probe it. (2020-11-20)

Anions matter
Metal-ion hybrid capacitors combine the properties of capacitors and batteries. One electrode uses the capacitive mechanism, the other the battery-type redox processes. Scientists have now scrutinized the role of anions in the electrolyte. The results, which have been published in the journal Angewandte Chemie, reveal the importance of sulfate anions. Sulfate-based electrolytes gave zinc-ion hybrid capacitors outstanding performance and extra-long operability. (2020-11-13)

Researchers 3D print biomedical parts with supersonic speed
Forget glue, screws, heat or other traditional bonding methods. A Cornell University-led collaboration has developed a 3D printing technique that creates cellular metallic materials by smashing together powder particles at supersonic speed. (2020-11-10)

A 40-year-old catalyst unveils its secrets
Activity of the industrial catalyst TS-1 relies on titanium pairs / important discovery for catalyst development (2020-11-02)

Direct observation of a single electron's butterfly-shaped distribution in titanium oxide
A research team led by Nagoya University has observed the smeared-out spatial distribution of a single valence electron at the centre of a titanium oxide molecule, using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and a new Fourier synthesis method also developed by the team. The method can determine the orbital states in materials regardless of their physical properties and without the need for difficult experiments or analytical techniques. The work was published recently in Physical Review Research. (2020-10-28)

On-surface synthesis of graphene nanoribbons could advance quantum devices
An international multi-institution team of scientists has synthesized graphene nanoribbons -- ultrathin strips of carbon atoms -- on a titanium dioxide surface using an atomically precise method that removes a barrier for custom-designed carbon nanostructures required for quantum information sciences. (2020-10-26)

Scientists from NUST MISIS manage to improve metallic glasses
Researchers at National University of Science and Technology MISIS (NUST MISIS) have managed to develop a unique method to process bulk metallic glasses. According to the authors of the study, they have managed to find processing conditions that significantly improve the quality of this promising material. The research results were published in Journal of Alloys and Compounds. (2020-10-23)

The new heavy isotope mendelevium-244 and a puzzling short-lived fission activity
A team of scientists from GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, University Mainz (JGU), Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) and the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland, has provided new insights into the fission processes in exotic nuclei and for this, has produced the hitherto unknown nucleus mendelevium-244. The experiments were part of ''FAIR Phase 0'', the first stage of the FAIR experimental program. The results have now been published in the journal ''Physical Review Letters''. (2020-10-21)

Material found in house paint may spur technology revolution
The development of a new method to make non-volatile computer memory may have unlocked a problem that has been holding back machine learning and has the potential to revolutionize technologies like voice recognition, image processing and autonomous driving. (2020-10-19)

Recent Atlantic ocean warming unprecedented in nearly 3,000 years
Sediments from a lake in the Canadian High Arctic allow climate scientists to extend the record of Atlantic sea-surface temperature from about 100 to 2,900 years. It shows that the warmest interval over this period has been the past 10 years. A team led by Francois Lapointe and Raymond Bradley in the Climate System Research Center at UMass Amherst analyzed ''perfectly preserved'' annual layers of sediment that accumulated in the lake on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut Territory. (2020-10-14)

UCF researchers are working on tech so machines can thermally 'breathe'
In the era of electric cars, machine learning and ultra-efficient vehicles for space travel, computers and hardware are operating faster and more efficiently. But this increase in power comes with a trade-off: They get superhot. To counter this, University of Central Florida researchers are developing a way for large machines to ''breathe'' in and out cooling blasts of water to keep their systems from overheating. The findings are detailed in a recent study in the journal Physical Review Fluids. (2020-10-13)

Vaporized metal in the air of an exoplanet
An international team of researchers led by the National Centre of Competence in Research PlanetS of the University of Bern and the University of Geneva studied the atmosphere of the ultra-hot exoplanet WASP-121b. In it, they found a number of gaseous metals. The results are a next step in the search for potentially habitable worlds. (2020-10-08)

Evidence of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's & MND in brains of young people exposed to dirty air
After examining the brainstems of 186 young Mexico City residents aged between 11 months and 27 years of age, researchers, including Professor Barbara Maher from Lancaster University, found markers not only of Alzheimer's disease, but also of Parkinson's and of motor neurone disease (MND) too. These markers of disease were coupled with the presence of tiny, distinctive nanoparticles within the brainstem - their appearance and composition indicating they were likely to come from vehicle pollution. (2020-10-06)

Two-dimensional MXene as a novel electrode material for next-generation display
Two-dimensional MXene as a novel electrode material for next-generation display. (2020-10-05)

Lighting the path to recycling carbon dioxide
Combining solar-harvesting materials with carbon-dioxide-consuming microbes could be an efficient way to generate clean fuels. (2020-10-05)

Scientists capture candid snapshots of electrons harvesting light at the atomic scale
A team of scientists led by Berkeley Lab has gained important new insight into electrons' role in the harvesting of light in artificial photosynthesis systems. The scientists say that their findings can help researchers develop more efficient material combinations for the design of high-performance solar fuels devices. (2020-09-30)

Brazilian researcher creates an ultra-simple inexpensive method to fabricate optical fiber
The conventional process requires costly large-scale equipment. The novel method can be executed in a single step by a device no larger than a microwave oven. (2020-09-10)

Painting with light: Novel nanopillars precisely control intensity of transmitted light
By shining white light on a glass slide stippled with millions of tiny titanium dioxide pillars, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their collaborators have reproduced with astonishing fidelity the luminous hues and subtle shadings of 'Girl With a Pearl Earring.' (2020-09-04)

A titanate nanowire mask that can eliminate pathogens
Researchers in Lásló Forró's lab at EPFL, Switzerland, are working on a membrane made of titanium oxide nanowires, similar in appearance to filter paper but with antibacterial and antiviral properties. Their material works by using the photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide: when exposed to ultraviolet radiation, the fibers convert resident moisture into oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide, which have the ability to destroy pathogens. (2020-08-07)

Superior TNOx/HRGO hybrid anode for lithium-ion batteries
In a paper published in NANO, a team of researchers from Chengdu Development Center of Science and Technology have significantly enhanced the performance of titanium niobium oxides for lithium-ion batteries. This has applications in electric vehicles and mobile electronics. (2020-08-04)

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