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Current Tooth Decay News and Events, Tooth Decay News Articles.
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Rebirth of a volcano
Continued volcanic activity after the collapse of a volcano has not been documented in detail so far. Now and for the first time, researchers from the German Research Center for Geosciences GFZ and Russian volcanologists are presenting the results of a photogrammetric data series spanning seven decades for the Bezymianny volcano, Kamchatka, in the journal ''Nature Communications Earth and Environment''. (2020-09-10)

A new kind of liquid scintillator via hybridizing perovskite nanocrystals with organic molecules
Highly-efficient scintillators are playing an essential role in various fundamental science and industrial applications. For enhancing quantum yield, scientists in South Korea demonstrated a new kind of scintillating nanomaterials via hybridizing perovskite nanocrystals with organic molecules, which make it possible to detect X-rays efficiently and to achieve high-quality X-ray images in liquid form. The hybrid nanomaterials will hold substantial promise for advancing the industrial applications of X-ray imaging and producing intriguing scintillation in other hybrid nanomaterial systems. (2020-09-09)

Mineral undergoes self-healing of irradiation damage
Several minerals suffer radioactive self-irradiation and hence experience long-term changes of their properties. The mineral monazite virtually behaves ''just alike Camembert cheese in which holes are drilled'': Existing radiation damage heals itself. An international research team led by Lutz Nasdala, Institute of Mineralogy and Crystallography, University of Vienna, conducted an ion-irradiation study that has unravelled the causes of the self-healing of monazite. Results were published in ''Scientific Reports''. (2020-09-09)

The oldest Neanderthal DNA of Central-Eastern Europe
A new study reports the oldest mitochondrial genome of a Neanderthal from Central-Eastern Europe. The mitochondrial genome of the tooth, discovered at the site of Stajnia Cave in Poland, is closer to a Neanderthal specimen from the Caucasus than to the contemporaneous Neanderthals of Western Europe. Stone tools found at the site are also analogous to the southern regions suggesting that Neanderthals living in the steppe/taiga environment had a broader foraging radius than previously envisaged. (2020-09-08)

New fossil ape is discovered in India
A 13-million-year-old fossil unearthed in northern India comes from a newly discovered ape, the earliest known ancestor of the modern-day gibbon. The discovery fills a major void in the ape fossil record and provides important new evidence about when the ancestors of today's gibbon migrated to Asia from Africa. (2020-09-08)

Mineral dust ingested with food leaves characteristic wear on herbivore teeth
In a controlled feeding study of guinea pigs, paleontologists have discovered that mineral dust ingested with food causes distinct signs of wear on the teeth of plant-eating vertebrates, which can differ considerably depending on the type of dust. (2020-08-25)

Scientists sink teeth into identifying several new bacteria that cause dental caries
The microbial ecosystem of our body plays a vital role in its upkeep. Any imbalance in this ecosystem can cause several health problems; in our mouth, this can mean tooth cavities. Motivated by the need to find out why an increasing number of young Japanese people are reporting tooth decay, scientists from Japan examined saliva samples from university students. They discovered insightful differences in the oral microbial communities of those with and without tooth decay. (2020-08-21)

Massive, well-preserved reptile found in the belly of a prehistoric marine carnivore
Paleontologists have found a giant ichthyosaur skeleton containing one of the longest fossils ever found in the stomach of a prehistoric marine reptile--the skeleton of a four-meter-long aquatic reptile called a thalattosaur. While the researchers can't say for sure whether it was scavenged or preyed upon, it could be the oldest direct evidence that Triassic marine reptiles like ichthyosaurs--previously thought to be cephalopod feeders--were apex megapredators. The findings appear August 20th in the journal iScience. (2020-08-20)

Low-dose real-time X-ray imaging with nontoxic double perovskite scintillators
X-ray imaging is widely used in probing the inside information non-destructively. Towards this goal, Scientist in China realized high-resolution X-ray image with the lowest X-ray dose to date, and demonstrated the first real-time X-ray imaging based on nontoxic Cs2Ag0.6Na0.4In0.85Bi0.15Cl6 double perovskite scintillator. This research unfolds huge potentials to explore scintillators beyond lead halide perovskites and lay the foundation for the development of low-dose, high-quality, high-stability X-ray imaging technology. (2020-08-18)

Stopping tooth decay before it starts -- without killing bacteria
Eating sugar or other carbohydrates after dental cleanings causes oral bacteria to quickly rebuild plaque and to produce acids that corrode tooth enamel, leading to cavities. Today, scientists report a treatment that could someday stop plaque and cavities from forming in the first place, using a new type of cerium nanoparticle formulation. The researchers will present their results at the American Chemical Society Fall 2020 Virtual Meeting & Expo. (2020-08-17)

Mix of contaminants in Fukushima wastewater, risks of ocean dumping
Nearly 10 years after the Tohoku-oki earthquake and tsunami devastated Japan's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power, radiation levels have fallen to safe levels in all but the waters closest to the shuttered power plant. An article published August 8 in the journal Science looks at the many radioactive elements contained in the tanks and suggests that more needs to be done to understand the potential risks of releasing wastewater from the tanks into the ocean. (2020-08-06)

Smaller habitats worse than expected for biodiversity
Biodiversity's ongoing global decline has prompted policies to protect and restore habitats to minimize animal and plant extinctions. However, biodiversity forecasts used to inform these policies are usually based on assumptions of a simple theoretical model describing how the number of species changes with the amount of habitat. A new study published in the journal Nature shows that the application of this theoretical model underestimates how many species go locally extinct when habitats are lost. (2020-07-29)

Science sweetens native honey health claims
Examination of honey from five different stingless bee species across Neotropical and Indo-Australian regions has enabled for the first time the identification of the unusual disaccharide trehalulose as a major component representing between 13 and 44 g per 100 g of each of these honeys. The previously unrecognised abundance of trehalulose in stingless bee honeys is concrete evidence that supports some of the reported health attributes of this product. This is the first identification of trehalulose as a major component within a food commodity. (2020-07-22)

Atomic force microscopy reveals nanoscale dental erosion from beverages
KAIST researchers used atomic force microscopy to quantitatively evaluate how acidic and sugary drinks affect human tooth enamel at the nanoscale level. This novel approach is useful for measuring mechanical and morphological changes that occur over time during enamel erosion induced by beverages. (2020-07-22)

Physicists find ways to control gamma radiation
Researchers from Kazan Federal University, Texas A&M University and Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Academy of Sciences) found ways to direct high frequency gamma radiation by means of acoustics. (2020-07-21)

Smile: Atomic imaging finds root of tooth decay
A collaboration between researchers from Cornell University, Northwestern University and University of Virginia combined complementary imaging techniques to explore the atomic structure of human enamel, exposing tiny chemical flaws in the fundamental building blocks of our teeth. The findings could help scientists prevent or possibly reverse tooth decay. (2020-07-21)

Gum disease may raise risk of some cancers
People who have periodontal (gum) disease may have a higher risk of developing some forms of cancer, suggests a letter published in the journal Gut detailing a prospective study. (2020-07-20)

Archaeologists use tooth enamel protein to show sex of human remains
A new method for estimating the biological sex of human remains based on reading protein sequences rather than DNA has been used to study an archaeological site in Northern California. The protein-based technique gave superior results to DNA analysis in studying 55 sets of human remains between 300 and 2,300 years old. (2020-07-17)

New very short-lived isotope 222Np is observed
In a recent study, researchers at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators reported the first discovery of 222Np, a new very short-lived Np isotope, and validated the N = 126 shell effect in Np isotopes. The experiment, led by Prof. GAN Zaiguo of IMP, was carried out at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou. (2020-07-16)

Scientists demonstrate a new experiment in the search for theorized 'neutrinoless' proc
Nuclear physicists affiliated with Berkeley Lab played a leading role in analyzing data for a demonstration experiment in France that has achieved record precision for a specialized detector material. (2020-07-13)

Insights into climate change during origin of dinosaurs
An international team reveals discoveries about an unusual time called the 'Carnian Pluvial Episode,' a time around the origin of the dinosaurs. (2020-07-13)

Context matters: Neighborhood factors associated with heavier drinking
People in wealthier neighborhoods drink alcohol twice as frequently as people in poorer areas, suggests a new study from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation. (2020-07-12)

Optical shaping of polarization anisotropy in a laterally-coupled-quantum-dot dimer
Coupled-quantum-dot (CQD) structures are considered to be an important building block in the development of scalable quantum devices. We found that emission of a laterally-coupled QD structure is strongly polarized along the coupled direction and its polarization anisotropy can be shaped by changing the orientation of the excitation polarization. Surprisingly, both excitons and local biexcitons separately in the two quantum dots show the same anisotropy although the polarization anisotropy of the emission is determined by the excitation polarization. (2020-07-10)

Study of supercooled liquids contributes to better understanding of phase change processes
The authors propose a new quantitative approach to better measure the crystal growth rate in supercooled liquids. The approach is based on a unique statistical algorithm used in molecular dynamics simulation. (2020-07-09)

Scientists trace the origin of our teeth from the most primitive jawed fish
An international team of scientists led by Uppsala University (Sweden), in collaboration with the ESRF, the European Synchrotron (France), the brightest X-ray source, has digitally 'dissected', for the first time, the most primitive jawed fish fossils with teeth found near Prague more than 100 years ago. The results, published today in Science, show that their teeth have surprisingly modern features. (2020-07-09)

Advanced technology sheds new light on evolution of teeth
The evolution of our teeth began among ancient armoured fishes more than 400 million years ago. In the scientific journal Science, an international team led by researchers from Uppsala University presents ground-breaking findings about these earliest jawed vertebrates. Using powerful X-ray imaging, they show that unique fossils found near Prague contain surprisingly modern-looking teeth. (2020-07-09)

Researchers develop novel approach to modeling yet-unconfirmed rare nuclear process
Researchers from the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Laboratory at Michigan State University (MSU) have taken a major step toward a theoretical first-principles description of neutrinoless double-beta decay. Observing this yet-unconfirmed rare nuclear process would have important implications for particle physics and cosmology. Theoretical simulations are essential to planning and evaluating proposed experiments. The research team presented their results in an article recently published in Physical Review Letters. (2020-07-06)

Complexity of human tooth enamel revealed at atomic level in NIH-funded study
Scientists used a combination of advanced microscopy and chemical detection techniques to uncover the structural makeup of human tooth enamel at unprecedented atomic resolution, revealing lattice patterns and unexpected irregularities. The findings could lead to a better understanding of how tooth decay develops and might be prevented. (2020-07-01)

Materials scientists drill down to vulnerabilities involved in human tooth decay
Northwestern University researchers have cracked one of the secrets of tooth decay. The materials scientists are the first to identify a small number of impurity atoms in human enamel that may contribute to the material's strength but also make it more soluble. They also are the first to determine the spatial distribution of the impurities with atomic-scale resolution. The discovery could lead to a better understanding of human tooth decay as well as genetic conditions that affect enamel formation. (2020-07-01)

Introducing a new isotope: Mendelevium-244
A team of scientists working at Berkeley Lab's 88-Inch Cyclotron has discovered a new form of the human-made element mendelevium. The newly created isotope, mendelevium-244, is the 17th and lightest form of the element, which was first discovered in 1955 by a Berkeley Lab team. (2020-06-23)

Evidence supports 'hot start' scenario and early ocean formation on Pluto
The accretion of new material during Pluto's formation may have generated enough heat to create a liquid ocean that has persisted beneath an icy crust to the present day. This 'hot start' scenario contrasts with the traditional view of Pluto's origins as a ball of frozen ice and rock in which radioactive decay could have eventually generated enough heat to melt the ice and form a subsurface ocean. (2020-06-22)

Are planets with oceans common in the galaxy? It's likely, NASA scientists find
Several years ago, planetary scientist Lynnae Quick began to wonder whether any of the more than 4,000 known exoplanets, or planets beyond our solar system, might resemble some of the watery moons around Jupiter and Saturn. (2020-06-18)

Simple oral health steps help improve elite athletes' performance
Elite athletes who adopted simple oral health measures, such as using high fluoride toothpaste and cleaning between their teeth, reported significantly reduced negative effects on performance related to poor oral health, finds a study led by UCL. (2020-06-18)

A step forward in solving the reactor-neutrino flux problem
Joint effort of the nuclear theory group at the University of Jyvaskyla and the international collaborative EXO-200 experiment paves the way for solving the reactor antineutrino flux problems. The EXO-200 collaboration consists of researchers from 26 laboratories and the experiment is designed to measure the mass of the neutrino. As a by product of the calibration efforts of the experiment the electron spectral shape of the beta decay of Xe-137 could be measured. (2020-06-17)

Brain research sheds light on the molecular mechanisms of depression
A new study conducted in Turku, Finland, reveals how symptoms indicating depression and anxiety are linked to brain function changes already in healthy individuals. (2020-06-16)

A post-pandemic world: will populations be on the move? Study shows contagions could be catalysts for mass migration
Could the world soon be on the move again in the wake of COVID-19? Theoretical modelling by the University of Sydney's Centre for Complex Systems has shown that populations typically disperse following major global crises, including contagions. (2020-06-11)

Bacteria in Chinese pickles can prevent cavities -- Ben-Gurion University study
Prof. Ariel Kushmaro of the BGU Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering and the Chinese research team evaluated 14 different types of Sichuan pickles from southwest China. They extracted 54 different strains of Lactobacilli and found that one, L. plantarum K41, significantly reduced the incidence and severity of cavities. K41 was also highly tolerant of acids and salts, an additional benefit as a probiotic for harsh oral conditions. It also could have potential commercial value when added to dairy products. (2020-06-11)

Scientists carry out first space-based measurement of neutron lifetime
Scientists have found a way of measuring neutron lifetime from space for the first time -- a discovery that could teach us more about the early universe. (2020-06-11)

Discovery of important molecular mechanism of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease
Researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) in Berlin, in collaboration with colleagues from Milan, Paris and Mexico, have been able to highlight a new molecular mechanism of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: According to their discovery, the protein Rab35 and the mTOR signaling pathway it regulates play a central role in the formation of myelin sheaths in the peripheral nervous system. First in-vivo experiments show that new therapies can be derived from the findings. (2020-06-08)

Largest study to date of electronic dental records reviews understudied populations
The largest study to date of electronic dental records (EDRs) delves into both previously inaccessible data and data from understudied populations with the ultimate goal of improving oral treatment outcomes. Researchers from Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University evaluated EDRs of 217,887 patients containing more than 11 million observations, with observation periods as long as 37 years. (2020-06-04)

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